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MEMBERS OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE

KENT E. KELLER, Illinois, Chairman ROBERT RAMSPECK, Georgia

RICHARD J. WELCH, California REUBEN T. WOOD, Missouri

VITO MARCANTONIO, New York ERNEST LUNDEEN, Minnesota GEORGE J. SCHNEIDER, Wisconsin

II

493112

CONTENTS

Page

Hon. Henry Ellenbogen, Member of Congress from the State of Penn-

sylvania

15

c. Č. Gilbert, secretary, Southern States Industrial Council.

31

Francis J. Gorman, vice president, United Textile Workers of America - 41, 723

Thomas McMahon, president, United Textile Workers of America.--

51

L. Metcalfe Walling, representing Hon. Theodore Francis Greene, Gov-
ernor of the State of Rhode Island..

897

John W. Nickerson, in behalf of Governor Cross, of Connecticut, repre-

senting the Textile Manufacturers of Connecticut.-

94

Hon. William J. Fitzgerald, Deputy Labor Commissioner of Connecticut,

in behalf of Governor Cross, of Connecticut, representing labor--- 137

Hon. Joseph L. Hurley, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Massachusetts 147

Harold Daust, president, Massachusetts Textile Council. -

John A. Peel, vice president, United Textile Workers of America.

161

Walter C. Taylor, technical adviser, National Textile Labor Relations

Board

181, 644

William F. Kelley, of Philadelphia

186

Thomas A. Lawlor, president, Carpet and Rug Federation

195

Rolla L. Wallace, of the Carpet and Rug Federation.

197

H. D. Lisk, Concord, N. C., representing United Textile Workers of

America.

200, 764

J. Warren Madden, chairman, National Labor Relations Board..

209

Emil Rieve, president, American Federation of Hosiery Workers, Phila-

delphia.

218

William M. Leader, president, Philadelphia Branch, No. 1, American Fed-

eration of Hosiery Workers.--

230

Henry Jennings, president, Woolen and Worsted Federation of America - 238

Anthony Valente, secretary-treasurer, Woolen and Worsted Federation of

America.

242

Joseph Burge, representing Hosiery Workers of Philadelphia-

244

Miss Helen Herman, representing Women Workers in the Textile Industry - 248

Hon. H. B. Fulmer, Member of Congress from the State of South Caro-

lina...

250

George Taylor, vice president, Woolen and Worsted Federation of

America,

252

Paul R. Christopher, vice president, North Carolina State Federation of

Labor.

260

T. F. Moore, president, Local No. 1221, United Textile Workers of

America, Mooresville, N. C...

266

Ed. Christenbury, of Mooresville, N. C

269

L. James Johnson, of Bath, S. C.

273

Joseph R. White, vice president, United Textile Workers of America - 282

William E. G. Batty, secretary, New Bedford, Massachusetts, Textile

Council.

291

Mrs. E. L. Best, Womens Bureau, Department of Labor.-

295

Miss Katherine F. Lenroot, Chief of the Children's Bureau, Department

of Lahor.--

298

S. P. Meadows, National Legislative Representative, American Federa-

tion of Labor.

302

A. F. Hinrichs, Chief Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics

302

Frank Schweitzer, general secretary, American Federation of Silk Workers- 308

Miss Elizabeth Nord, representing United Textile Workers..

313

Horace A. Riviere, vice president of the New Eng'and District of the

United Textile Workers of America..

316

J. A. Frier, representing United Textile Workers of America

330

Albert R. Woodard, president, United Synthetic Yarn Workers.

334
Page

Paul E. Dean, representing United Textile Workers.

338

E. M. Sisk, representing United Textile Workers.

341

Arthur Besse, president, National Association of Wool Manufacturers.- 342

Hon. Charles A. Plumley, Member of Congress from the State of Ver-

mont

393

Dr. Claudius Murchison, president, Cotton Textile Institute.-

395

Robert R. West, president-treasurer, Dan River & Riverside Cotton

Mills, Danville, Va..

432

Fred W. Steele, general manager, Grinnell Manufacturing Corporation,

New Bedford, Mass., representing National Association of Cotton Man-

ufacturers

453

Herman Cone, treasurer, Proximity Manufacturing Co., Greensboro,

N. C..

486

William J. Matthews, counsel for National Association of Finishers of

Textile Fabrics

468

G. H. Dorr, representing the Cotton Textile Institute, Inc.

481

Sydney P. Munroe, assistant to the president, Cotton Textile Institute,

Inc.

500, 640

Hon. Joseph F. Guffey, United States Senator from the State of Penn-

sylvania..

535

Hon. George H. Earle, Governor of the State of Pennsylvania -

535

Herbert Gutterson, president, Institute of Carpet Manufacturers of

America

540

R. S. Smethurst, representing National Association of Manufacturers. 548

Earl Constantine, representing National Association of Hosiery Manu-

facturers.

577

M. D. Vincent, coordinator of industry studies, Review Division, Na-

tional Recovery Administration.

599, 629, 711

Howard E. Coffin, chairman of the Board of Southeastern Cottons, Inc.,

New York City -

642

Robert Lassiter, for Mr. John F. Matheson, on behalf of Mooresville

Cotton Mills, Mooresville, N. C.--

653

John F. Matheson, president, Mooresville Cotton Mills, Mooresville,

N. C.

671

Harvey Willson, general manager, National Upholstery & Drapery Textile

Association, Inc..

717

Miscellaneous statements, letters, and telegrams.

768

TO REHABILITATE AND STABILIZE LABOR CONDITIONS IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY OF THE UNITED STATES

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 1936

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON LABOR,

Washington, D. C. The subcommittee this day met at 10:30 a. m., in the caucus room, House Office Building, Hon. Kent E. Keller (chairman) presiding.

(The committee had under consideration H. R. 9072, which is as follows:)

(H. R. 9072, 74th Cong., 1st sess.)

A BILL To rehabilitate and stabilize labor conditions in thetextile industry of the United States; to prevent

unemployment, to regulate child labor, and to provide minimum wages, maximum hours, and other conditions of employment in said industry; to safeguard and promote the general welfare; and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

FINDINGS AND POLICY

SECTION 1. (a) The Congress of the United States as a matter of legislative determination hereby finds the following facts:

(1) The production of textile products in the United States and their distribution throughout the United States and foreign countries is affected with a national public interest.

(2) The flow of raw cotton, wool, silk, and other raw materials and supplies from certain States and from foreign countries to textile mills located primarily in the eastern seaboard and Southern States, the manufacture of such materials into various textile products, and the sale, transportation, and distribution of such textile products throughout all the States of the United States and numerous foreign countries constitute a continuous stream or current of commerce among the several States and between the States and foreign countries.

(3) In recent years this flow of interstate and foreign commerce in textile products has substantially declined in value and amount, has been subject to severe price instability, has been diverted in large quantities from certain States to other States and from certain mills to other mills by reason of unfair competition in wage rates and other conditions of employment, has been interrupted and greatly burdened by strikes and other forms of industrial unrest, and has otherwise been disorganized and depressed.

(4) Such effects upon interstate and foreign commerce in textile products have been caused directly and primarily by the instability of wage rates and other labor costs in the production of said products, by excessive competition in lowering such wage rates and other labor costs, by over-expansion and excess capacity of the productive equipment in the industry, and by denial of the rights of employees to organize and bargain collectively.

(5) Interstate and foreign commerce in textile products will be substantially and directly fostered, protected, regulated, stabilized, and otherwise promoted, and its flow directed, by the establishment of minimum wages, maximum hours, and other conditions of employment in mills whose products flow in such commerce, by control of excess production in such mills, and by the guarantee of the right of employees in such mills to organize and bargain collectively.

1

(6) (a) The production of textile products which flow in interstate and foreign commerce is frequently so intermingled and connected with and related to the production of similar products which do not themselves flow in such commerce that regulation of the former products cannot be rendered effective without regulation also of the latter products. Furthermore, regulation of textile products which flow in interstate and foreign commerce in numerous instances places such products at a erious competitive disadvantage with textile products which do not flow in such commerce, and thus directly and substantially affects, burdens, reduces, and otherwise obstructs the flow of textile products in interstate and foreign commerce, unless the same regulations are imposed upon textile products which do not themselves flow in such commerce as upon products which do flow directly in such commerce.

(b) It is hereby declared to be the policy of the United States, and among the purposes of this Act, to foster, protect, advance, and regulate the stream of commerce among the States and with foreign countries by the establishment of minimum wages, and maximum hours, by the regulation of child labor, work assignments, and other working conditions, by guaranteeing the right of employees to organize and bargain collectively, by the control of excess production, and by other means set forth in this Act.

Sec. 2. (a) The Congress of the United States as a matter of legislative determination hereby finds the following facts:

(1) Under present unregulated conditions, wages below a decent standard of health and comfort, excessive hours, child labor, overburdensome work assignments, other unhealthy and demoralizing conditions of work, the denial of the right of self-organization and collective bargaining, and excess production prevail in the textile industry, cause wide-spread unemployment and heavy financial expense to the Government of the United States, and constitute a menace to the health, safety, morals, welfare, and comfort of the citizens of the United States.

(2) Competitive conditions in commerce among the States in textile products prevent effective correction of such evils through local or State regulation and make necessary for their correction the exercise of the powers vested in the Congress of the United States.

(b) It is hereby declared that the existence of the evils in the textile industry as set forth in sections 1 and 2 of this Act is contrary to the public interest and to the policy of Congress, that it is the policy of Congress to remove these evils by this Act, and that it is among the purposes of this Act

(1) 'to deny the use of the channels of interstate commerce for the perpetuation and accentuation of such evils; and

(2) to deny the use of the mails, the benefits of Government purchases, contracts, loans, and grants, and the privilege of registration of securities to any person producing textile products under said conditions or contrary to the standards set forth in this Act.

DEFINITIONS

Sec. 3. As used herein(1) The term “textile industry” shall include, but without limitation(A) The manufacture or manufacture and sale of the following products, whether composed of cotton, wool, silk, rayon, hair, jute, or any other artificial or natural fiber, or combination thereof:

(a) Woven or knitted fabrics in the piece;
(b) Yarn, thread, twin, cord, cordage, or similar products;
(c) Rugs, carpets, or other floor coverings;

(d) Felt, felt products, batts, pads, wadding, welts, bindings, or similar products;

(e) Surgical dressings, sanitary napkins, or similar products;

(f) Lace, lace curtains, trimmings, braids and braided fabrics; woven, knitted, or braided elastic fabrics; bias tape or similar products;

(8) Pyroxylin coated leather cloth and lacquered fabrics, window-shade cloth, book cloth, impregnated fabrics for book binding, table oilcloth, or similar products;

(h) Hosiery and similar products;
(i) Knitted outerwear or underwear apparel or similar products;

(j) Any other textile product. (B) The sorting, dyeing, bleaching, mercerizing, weighting, printing, finishing, throwing, or other processing of any of the foregoing fibers or products: Provided, That it shall not include the ginning of cotton.

(2) The term “textile product" sball include any product of the textile industry.

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