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To return to the Lees. Hitherto the course of this family's descent has been based on a chain of positive facts; but, before we trace the consanguinity marked by heraldic bearings, some degree of inferential testimony must be admitted. This very numerous family is to be distinctly followed in our early archives—as that of Domesday, the Inquisitions, Valuations, Rotuli, and the curious record of royal rights intituled the Testa de Neville; from all of which excerpta have been made and compared. As before stated, the Leghs or Lees were all-powerful in Cheshire, as those of High Lee, of Lyme, of Ridge, of Begulegh, of Adlington, of Twemlow, and of Booths; but the branching off of the several casts into other counties, was under circumstances the particulars of which are now, perhaps, unattainable. Yet there is evidence that the Lees of Morton withdrew into Buckinghamshire in the early part of Henry the Fourth's reign, to avoid the persecution to which they were liable in consequence of their manifested attachment to the cause of the unhappy Richard the Second. The men of Cheshire were devoted to that monarch—the self-styled Princeps Cestrieas his crafty successor well knew; and no fewer than two hundre of their knights and squires lay dead upon the ensanguined field at Shrewsbury. Still it is shewn that, when Henry of Lancaster marched against Chester, the nidus of the Royalists, Sir Robert and Sir John a Legh were dispatched with a deputation to meet him, and surrender everything; and the family must have considered their safety as thereby guaranteed. But no sooner was the usurper in safe possession of the castle, than he ordered Perkin a Legh to be forthwith beheaded, and his head placed upon one of the loftiest towers of the city. This summary act excited great commiseration for the veteran warrior, whose father-in-law, Sir Piers a Legh, had received the lordship of Lyme from King Edward the Third, for taking the Count of Tankerville, Chamberlain of France, prisoner at Crecy, and bravely relieving the banner of the Black Prince.

An inscription which was placed to the memory of Perkin in an oratory belonging to the Lees of Lyme in Macclesfield church, at once briefly records the cause of his doom, and intimates that he fell a victim to treachery. This epitaph has been copied by Camden, Browne Willis, Lysons, and others; but,

as they all differ in a slight degree from one another, I took advantage of my son, Charles Piazzi, returning to Edinburgh in October, 1850, and stopping at Macclesfield, to procure me a rubbing from the brass itself: This has enabled me to present a faithful copy :

HERE LYETH THE BODIE OF PERKIN A LEGH
THAT FOR KING RICHARD THE DEATH DID DIE,

BETRAYED FOR RIGHTEOVSNES
AND THE BONES OF SIR PEERS HIS SONNE
THAT WITH KING HENRIE THE FIFT DID WONNE*

In PARIS.
Tius PERKIN SERVD KING EDWARD THE THIRD, AND THE BLACK PRINC
HIIS SONNE IN ALL THEIR WARRES IN FRANCE AND WAS AT THE BAT-
TELL OF CRESSIE AND HADD LYME GIVEN HIM† FOR THAT SERVICE:
AND AFTER THEIR DEATHES SERVED KING RICHARD THE SECOND,
AND LEFT HIM NOT IN HIS TROVBLES, BVT WAS TAKEN WITH HIM,
AND BEHEADED ATT CHESTER BY King HENRIE THE FOVRTH, AND
THE SAYD SIR PEERS HIS SONNE SERVED KING HENRIE THE FIFT,

AND WAS SLAINE ATT THE BATTELL OF AGENCOVRT.
IN THEIR MEMORIE SIR PETER LEGH OF LYME, KNIGHT, DESCENDED
FROM THEM, FYNDING THE SAYD OVLD VERSES WRITTEN VPPON
STONE IN THIS CHAPPELL, DID REEDIFIE TIJS PLACE AN° D'NI 1620.

A

Another branch of the Cheshire main, which held Lee Engleys and Lee Fraunceys, in Lancashire, sold the then unimportant manor of Liverpool to King John: they seem afterwards to have domiciliated as Der Edlen am Lee in the baillages of Kyburg and Gruningen, in the territory of Zurich, where they are now extinct, or sunk into the class of peasantry.

Macclesfield church, notwithstanding parts of its body are both modern and bizarre, is a goodly old pile, with the date 1218 over the great tower door. There are various monuments of the Lees and the Savages; of which a remarkable one commemorates a Roger Lee (ob. 1506), with his wife Elizabetha (ob.

* This word wonne, from the Saxon punan and German wohnen, to dwell, is not yet, I am informed, entirely out of use in that part of the kingdom. Perhaps a recollection of the epitaph induced Lady Elizabeth Lee to use the word in her stanzas on the Shepherd's Bower. (See page 42.)

† This must be an oversight, for Lyme was not bestowed for his own service at Crecy (see ante), where he must have been a mere boy. The battle of Crecy was fought in 1346, and the decapitation of Perkin was perpetrated in the year 1399.

( 1489); and there are kneeling behind them thirteen children. Between the figures is a plate whereon appears a mitred priest, perhaps Archbishop Savage himself, at his prayers, and under him an inscription which is defectively given in Gibson's Camden. In itself it is curious and exact as far as it goes, but the price of so comfortable a remission of torment which it pronounces, should have been added :—“The pdon for saying of v. paternost and v. aves and a cređ is xxvi. thousand yeres and xxvi. dayes of pardon.” It is on a wall of what is called Earl Rivers's Chapel; and there are in it recumbent figures of some of the Savage family. *

In the south-east angle of the body of the church is a more modern epitaph on a William Lee, setting forth that he was a master of great erudition in the school of King Edward the Sixth, (it was actually founded by Sir John Percivale in 1502,) in Macclesfield ; that he “sweated” therein for forty-three years, and sent many pupils to either un

university; that he taught Hebrew, Greek, and Roman; that he knew French, Spanish, and Italian; and that he died in 1630, at the age of seventy-four. This is recorded in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew; and it is, moreover, shewn, that William Lee was a person of

peace, a lover of concord, and preferred to suffer meekly than resent violently.

The close recurrence of such names as Macclesfield, Rivers, and Savage, cannot but strongly recall the startling and deeply-interesting narrative of Dr. Johnson. It must, however, remain a matter of wonder, how so sturdy a moralist could have been induced to varnish and vamp so profligate a character as his warm-hearted Fidus Achates undoubtedly was.

The genealogical Pedigree-Tables of Hampden, Ingoldsby, Lee, Beke, Antonie, and Fiott, from which the Doctor's descent is derived, are severally inserted in Lipscomb's History of the County of Buckinghamshire, where the

* Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Savage, knt. was married to Sir John Hampden, who was High Sheriff of Bucks in 1528. On a slab near the middle of the chancel of the church of Great Hampden, she is placed on the right hand of Sir John, and between them are the figures of three daughters.

inquiring antiquary can consult them; but as a convenient general reference, I
have here drawn up for the main stock

A GENEALOGICAL TABLE

OF THE FAMILY OF

OF LEE, OF HARTWELL,

FROM THE JUNCTION OF THE HOUSES OF HAMPDEN AND LEE.

Sir Thomas LEE, Knt. of East Claydon and Morton; FELEANOR HAMPDEN, dau, and eventually heiress of Michael
married 1570; died 1626.

Hampden, of Hartwell; born 1554; died 1633.

MICHAEL LEE.

Thomas LEE, of Morton and Hartwell; born 1573;FJANE, dau. of Sir James Throckmorton, of Fulbrock; high sheriff' 1629; died 1641.

died in 1642.

And twenty-two other

children.

Mary, dau. of George Dowse, Esq. of Thomas LEE, only son, buried in FELIZABETH, dau. of Sir George Croke, one of the Judges of the King's Sparsholt, Hants, widow of Sir N. Hartwell church, 1st September, | Bench; married 1633 ; and re-married to Sir Richard Ingoldsby, K.B. ; Fuller; ob. s. p.

1643.

died 1675. Sir Thomas LEE, K.B.; born 1635; created Bart. 1660; FANNE, dau. and heiress of Sir WILLIAM LEE, died cal. in MARY, married to died 1690; buried at Hart well; served in several parlia- | John Davis, of Pangbourne, by Turkey of the plague.

Sir John Morley, ments, and was one of the Lords Commissioners of the Anne, dau, of Sir John Suck- GEORGE LEE, died 1679. of Bere Court, near Admiralty.

ling, the poet ; died 1708.

SAMUEL LEE, born 1639. Reading.

TT

Sir Thomas LEE, 2nd Bart. , TALICE, dau. and co- John LEE, bapt. LIONEL LEE, FRANCES, vio. 1707. Martha, mar. John Padmore, Esq. ; born 16til at Hartwell, where i heir of Thomas Hop- 1666, viv. 1690; born 1674 ; JANE, born 1672 ; ob. 1721. he was buried in 1702 ; M.P. kins, Esq. of Lon- a captain in the ob. 8. p. ob. innupta 1738. MARY, ob, innupt, 1749. for Aylesbury in several par-. don; died 1728. army.

ANNE, twice marr. ; ELIZABETH, born 1662, mar. to Col. liaments.

ob. ante 1707.

Ric. Beke; ob. vidua 1737.

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Esq. of

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8. p. 1740.

Sir THOMASTELIZABETH, ANNE, dau. FRight Hon. Sir=MARGARET, Younger=John LEE,FMary, d. Rt. Hon. Sir GEORGE=Judith, SARAH, LEE, 3rd da, of Thos. of

WILLIAM LEE, d. of Roger dau. of bo. 1695; of John LEE, LL.D. Dean and dau. of bur. at Bart. born Sandys, of Goodwin, Knt.; bo. 1688; Drake, Esq. Sir Tho- Col. in the Browne, Chief Judge of the Hum- Hart1657 ; London; d. of Bury St. M.P. Lord Chief and relict of mas Guards;

Court of Arches, M.P. phrey well, served in

1728. Edmund's ; | Justice, Privy Fr. Mel- Hardy, ob. 1760. Arlesey, and Lord of the Ad- Morrice, 1693. several pardied 1729. Councillor ; died moth; died ob.in

Beds. miralty; died 1758, of Lonliaments ;

1754.
1752, 8. p. puerp.

don, ob. died 1749.

1740.

1743.

T Thomas LEE, Sir WILLIAM LEE, FELIZABETH, dau. ANNE, born 1721, William LEE, FPHILADELPHIA, dau. Tuomas LEE, Equerry to H.R.H. bo. 1722 ; ob. 4th Bart. ; born of Simon, Earl mar.

to G. v.

of Totteridge of Sir Thomas Dyke, the Duke of Gloucester ; ob.
1726 ; ob. 1799, Harcourt ; born Vernon, Esq. cre- Park, Herts ; Bart. of Lullingstone 1814 colebs.
æt. 72.

1739; ma. 1763; ated Lord Vernon; ob. 1778. Castle; ob. 1799. JOHN LEE, an Ensign in the
died 1811.
d. 1742, 8. p.

Guards ; ob. ante 1802.

T Sir William LEE, Rev. Sir GEORGE LEE, ELIZA- William LEE, Esq. Puila- HARRIET, TJohn Frott, Esq. merchant, of Louisa, mar. to 5th Bart. ; born 6th Bart. ; born 1767; BETH,

took the name of DEL- bo. 1763; | London, fourth son of Nicho- Eduard Arrow1764 ; Col. 16th M.A. Oxon., Vicar of only Antonie, of Col

PHA, ma. 1782; | las Fiott, Esq. lord of the fee smith, Esq. of Light Dragoons ; Stone and Rector of dau. ; worth, in Beds. ; ob. in- ob. 1795; and seigniory of Melesches, in Totteridge ; d. ob. 1801, at Ma- Hartwell and Beach

born
served in several nupt.

buried at Jersey ; b. at St. Helier's, 1749; June, 1810. dras cælebs. ampton; ob. 1827 cal.

1765 ;
parliaments ; died

Totte- died at Bath 27th Jan. 1797 ; SOPHIA, ob. ind. 1767. Sept. 1825.

ridge. buried at Totteridge, co. Herts. nupt. T

7 John Fiott, eldest son and heir ; born = Cecilia RUT

.

T

WILLIAM

EDWARD NICHOLASTHARRIET JEN- PILADELPHIA, born 10th May, 1784; 28 April, 1783 ; late Fellow of St. TER, born at

EDWARD
Fiort,b. Fiort, b. NER, dau. of

mar, to John Ede, Esq. merchant, of
John's, Cambridge, and Trav. Bach. of Lymington, Fiott, bo. 12 Jan. 5th June Sir Percival London.t
that University, LL.D, F.R.S., &c.; co. Hants. ; 28th July, 1791; 1794; late Hart Dyke, HARRIET, born 5th June, 1785; ob. 6th
took the name of Lee only, by royal mar. at St.

1786 ; a

Lieut. in Fellow of Bart. of Lul- Feb. 1841, innupt.
mandate, 4th October, 1815, in com- Bennet's, Lt. R.N.; the Ma- St. John's lingstone Cas- Louisa, born 6th Oct. 1787; ob. innupt.
pliance with an injunction contained in Doctors'Com- died 6th dras Ar- Cam- tle, co. Kent ; 1 March, 1832.
the last will of his maternal uncle Wil-

mons, 25th
May,

bridge, ma. June 11th Sophia, b, 6 Oct. 1789; d. in Nov. 1795. liam Lee Antonie, of Colworth House, Oct. 1833. 1849, 18 Nov. M.A. 1835.

SARAH-ANNE, born 27th Oct. 1792; Beds. devisee of Sir George Lee, Bart.

calebs. 1824.

died in Feb. 1794,

.

my; ob.

1

From what is now placed before him, the reader will perceive that the Hartwell Family have continued in undisputed enjoyment of the inheritance, through an uninterrupted succession of their posterity, from about the year 1268 to the present time. Hence Browne Willis, in the before-mentioned manuscript written a century and a quarter ago, observed—“Having thus concluded my account of this manner (manor), I cannot omit here remarking that few parishes I have ever met with can shew for so long a series, viz. upwds of five hundred years, such an uninterrupted possession of an estate, which has never been alienated otherwise than as it has passed in marriage or failure of issue male, wherefore it may still be said to continue in the same family.” But in rendering this notice to the proprietors of the soil, that learned antiquary might also have adduced, as an equal tribute to local stability, that most of the tenants were of very long standing; and, though some of them have either migrated or died out in the last century, even now there are still on the Doctor's rent-roll the names of Monk, Horton, Gurney, Todd, and Carter, whose progenitors appear as standards on the terriers for 1550 and 1553, recently examined by me at Hartwell : and in another for 1570, William Flameborow occurs, whose line still exists through the variations Pharmborough, Farmborow, and Farmborough.* Hence it is seen that this estate bears holders, whose respective fore-fathers have occupied farms “on his honour's estate” for upwards of three hundred years; and it is certain that a majority of the others are of one hundred years' standing. This, considering the changes of recent times from speculation and high farming, is equally creditable to the lords of the manor and the tenants.

Having thus traced the Lees from their first establishment at Hartwell to the year of Grace 1850, it only remains to notice their heraldic bearings. The acknowledged adherents of Richard the Second, no doubt, wore the cele

a

* Could one of this family have been the prototype of Goldsmith's honest farmer, in the immortal “ Vicar of Wakefield"? There is inferential testimony to Oliver's having visited these parts; and from a dinner given to him at Bedford, he has perpetuated the epulary powers of the Corporation of that place in his play, “ She stoops to Conquer."

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