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LITERARY AND HISTORICAL NOTICE. THE opinions of commentators are divided upon this play. Hanmer supposes that some particular speecbes 2

Shakspeare's : Upton, that he had no hand in its production: Theobald considers it one of his wars pieres : Pope decides that the style is more natural and unaffected than our poet's usually wus : and Johnssa decisses that both in the serious and ludicrous scenes, the language and sentiments are Shakspeare's ; apd that for of bis plays have more lines or passages, which, singly considered, are emineatly beautiful. Obe thing, bro. ever, appears certain---that this drama was one of bis earliest efforts; that it was not very farearably received ; and that, being seldom exhibited, it escaped the corruptions and interpolations, to whick bi usu populer performances were subjected. The incidents of the play have not been assigned to say defecte source ; though it is not improbable that The Arcadia, and the common romances so much in vogue et period, might have suggested some of thom. Dr. Johnson says, that it evinces " a strange mixture of kw lenge and ignorance, of care and negligence ;” and that "the versification is often excellent--the allusca learned and just.”

DRAMATIS PERSONA. DUKE OF MILAN, Father to Silvia,

Host, where Julia lodges in Milan. VALENTINE, } Gentlemen of Verona.

OUTLAWS. ANTONIO, Father to Proteus.

JULIA, a Lady of Verona, beloved by Pretros. ILURIO, a foolish rival to Valentine. Silvia, the Duke's Daughter, belored by Fa LGLAMOUR, Agent for Silvia in her escape.

lentine.
SPEED, a clounish Servant to Valentine. LUCETTA, Waiting-woman to Julia.
LAUNCE, Servant to Proteus.
PANTBINO, Servant to Antonio.

Servants, Musicians.
SCENB—sometimes in Verona, sometimes in Milan, and on the Frontiers of Mantua.

ACT I.

If ever danger do environ thee,

Commend thy grievance to my holy prayers, SCENE I.-An open place in Verona. For I will be thy beadsman, Valentine,

Val. And on a love-book pray for my sucere Enter VALENTINE and PROTEUS.

Pro. Upon some book i love, I'm pray for Val. Cease to persuade, my loving Proteus ;

thee. Home-keeping youth bave ever bomely wits : Val. That's on some shallow story of deep Wer't not, affection ohains thy tender days

love, Ic the sweet glances of thy honour'd love, How young Leander cross'd the Hellespost. rather would entreat thy company,

Pro. That's a deep story of a deeper lare ; To see the wonders of the world abroad, For be was more than over sboes in love. ango living dully sluggardiz'd at home,

Val. 'Tis true ; for you are over boots in Year out thy youth with shapeless idleness.

love ; wat, since thou lov'st, luve still, and thrive And yet you never swam the Hellespoot. therein,

Pro. Over the boots ? nay, give me not the Even as I would, when I to love begin.

boots. Pro. Wilt thou be gone Sweet Valentine, Val. No, l'll not, for it boots thee Dot. adieu !

Pro. What Think on thy Proteus, wben thou, baply, secat Val. To be Goue rare note-worthy object in thy travel : In love, where scora is bought with groans ; CEY t'ish me partaker in ihy bappiness,

looks, when thou dost meet good hap; and, in thy danger,

• A humorous punishment at barvest-bese feasts, se With heart-sore sighs; one fading moment's Pro. But dost thou hear gav'st thou my mirth,

letter to Julia With twenty watchful, weary, tedious nights : Speed. Ay, Sir : 1, a lost mutton, gave your If baply won, perhaps, a bapless gain;

letter to her, a laced muttow';and sbe, a laced If loot, why tben a grievous labour won ; mutton, gave me, a lost mutton, nothing for my However, but a folly bought with wit,

labour. Or else a wit by folly vanquisbed.

Pro. Here's too small a pasture for such a Pro. So, by your circumstance, you call me store of muttons. fool.

Speed. If the ground be overcharged, you Yal. So, by your circumstance, I fear, you'll were best stick her. prove.

Pro. Nay, in that you are astray ; 'lwere best Pro. 'Tis love you cavil at ; I am not Love.

pound you. Val. Love is your master, for he masters you : Speed. Nay, Sir, less than a pound shall serve And be that is so yoked by a fool,

me for carrying your letter.
Methinks should not be chronicled for wise. Pro. You mistake; I mean the pound, a pin.

Pro. Yet writers say, As in the sweetest bud fold.
The eating canker dwells, so eating love

Speed. From a pound to a pin? fold it over
Tababits in the finest wits of all.

and over,. Val. Yet writers say, as the most forward 'Tis threefold too little for carrying a letter to bud

your lover.
1s eaten by the cauker ere it blow,

Pro. But what said she did she nod ?
Even 90 by love the young and tender wit

(SPEED nods. Is turn’d to folly, blasting in the bud,

Speed. I.
Losing bis verdure evcu in the prime,

Pro. Nod, I ? why, that's noddy. +
And all the fair effects of future hopes.

Speed. You mistook, Sir; I say she did nod: But wberefore waste I time to counsel thee, and you ask me, if she did nod, and I say, I. Tbat art a votary to fond desire ?

Pro. And that set together, is-noddy. Once more adieu : my father at the road

Speed. Now you have taken the pains to set Expects my coming, there to see me shipp'd. it together, take it for your pains. Pro. And thither will I bring thee, Valen. Pro. No, no, you shall have it for bearing tine.

the letter. Val. Sweet Proteus, no; now let us take our Speed. Well, I perceive, I must be fain to leave.

bear with you. or Milan, let us hear from thee by letters,

Pro. Why, Sir, how do you bear with me? At thy success in love, and what news eise

Speed. Marry, Sir, the letter very orderly ; Betideth bere in absence of thy friend :

having nothing but the word, noddy for my And I likewise will visit thee with mine.

pains. Pro. All happiness bechance to thee in Pro. Besbrew me, but you have a qnick wit. Milan !

Speed. And yet it cannot overtake your slow Tal. As much to you at home! and so farc- purse. well.

[Erit VALENTINE. Pro. Come, come, open the matter in brief ; Pro. He after honour hunts, I after love : What said she ? He leaves his friends, to dignify them more ; Speed. Open your purse, that the money and I leave myself, my friends, and all for love. the matter may be both at once deliver'd. Thou, Julia, thou hast metamorphos'd me; Pro. Well, Sir, here is for your pains : What Made me neglect my studies, lose my time, said she ? War with good counsel, set the world at

Speed. Truly, Sir, I think you'll hardly win nought!

her. Made wit with musing weak, beart sick with Pro. Wby? Could'st thou perceive so much thought.

from her ?

Speed, Sir, I could perceive nothing at all Enter SPEED.

from her; no, not so much as a ducat for deliSpeed. Sir Proteus, save you; Saw you my that brought your mind, I fear, sbe'll prove as

vering your letter : And being so hard to me master 1 Pro. But now he parted bence, to embark token but stones; for sbe's as bard as steel.

hard to you in telling ber mind. Give her no for Milan.

Pro. What, said she nothing?
Speed. Twenty to one then, he is sbipp'd

Speed. No, not so much as-take this for thy already ; And I have play'd the sheep in losing him.

pains. To testify your bounty, I thank you, Pro. Indeed a sheep doth very often stray,

you bave testern'dt me; in requital whereof, An if the shepberd be a while away.

henceforth carry your letters yourself: and so, Speed. You conclude that my master is a

Sir, I'll commend you to my master.

Pro. Go, go, be gone, to save your ship from sbepherd then, and I a sheep?

wreck : Pro. I do. Speed. Why then my horns are his horns, Being destined to a drier death on shore :

Which cannot perish, having tbee aboard,
whether I wake or sleep.

I must go send some better messenger ;
Pro. A silly answer, and fitting well a sheep. i fear, my Julia would not deigo my lines,
Speed. This proves me still a sheep.
Pro. True ; and thy master a shepherd.

Receiving them from such a worthless post.

(Exeunt. Speed. Nay, that I can deny by a circum

stance. Pro. It shall go hard, but I'll prove it by SCENE II.-The same. Garden of Julia's another.

house. Speer. The shepherd seeks the sheep, and not

Enter JULIA and LUCETTA. thy sbeep the shepherd; but I seek my master, and my master seeks not me ; therefore, I am

Jul. But say, Lacetta, now we are alone, no sheep.

Would'st thou then counsel me to fall in love ? Pro. The sheep for fodder follow the shep- Luc. Ay, madam; 80 you stumble not unberd, the shepherd for food follows not the

heedfully. sherp ; thou for wages followest thy master, thy master for wages follows not thee: therefore, tbou art a sheep.

A term for a girl of pleasure : Mution-lane, in Speed. Such another proof will make me cry such persons.

Clerkenwell, is so called from being frequented by

+ Agame at cards. baa.

• Givcu inc a sixpesce.

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me.

Jul. Of all the fair resort of gentlemen, Wben inward joy enfore'd my heart to smile! That every day with parle encounter me, My penance is, to call Lucetta back, In thy opinion, wbich is worthiest love?

And ask remission for my lolly past :Luc. Please you, repeat their names, I'll / What ho! Lucetta !

show my mind According to my shallow simple skill.

Re-enter LOCETTA. Jul. What thiuk'st thou of the fair Sir Egla

Luc. What would your ladyship?

Jul. Is it pear dinner-time Luc. As of a knight well-spoken, neat and

Luc. I would it were ;

That you might kill your stomacbon your But, were you, he never should be mine. Jul. What think'st thou of the rich Mercatio 3

meat, Luc. Well of his wealtb; but of bimself, so

And not upon your maid.

i Jul. What is't you took up 80, Jul, Wbat think'st thou of the gentle Pro

So gingerly?

Luc. Nothing. teus ? Luc. Lord, lord ! to see what folly reigns in

Jul. Why did'st thou stoop then?

Luc. To take a paper up that I let fall. us! Jul. How now! what means this passion at

Jul. Aud is that paper nothing? bis naine ?

Luc. Nothing concerning me. Luc. Pardou, dear madam; tis a passing

Jul. Then let it lie for those that it concurs. shame,

Luc. Madain, it will vot lie wbere ii con That I, unworthy body as I am,

cerns, Should censure + thus on lovely gentlemen.

Unless it have a false interpreter.

Jul. Some love of your's hath wit to you is Jul. Why not on Proteus, as of all the rest? Luc. Then thus, -of many good I think him

rhyme.

Luc. That I might sing it, madam, to : best.

tune : Jul. Your reason ? Luc. I have no other but a woman's reason ;

Give me a note : your ladysbip can set.

Jul. As little by such toys as may be posI thiuk him so, because I think him so.

sible : Jul. And would'st thou have ine cast my love on bim?

Best sing it to the tune of Light a' tore. Luc. Ay, if you thoughi your love not cast

Luc. It is too heavy for su light a tane.

Jul. Heavy? belike it bain some berdes away.

then. Jul. Why, be of all the rest hath never mov'd

Luc. Ay; and melodious were it, would you Luc. Yet he of all the rest, I think, best loves

sing it.

Jul. And why not you! ye. Jul. His little speaking shows his love but

Luc. I cannot reach so high. small.

Jul. Let's see your soug ;-Hot bos, si

nion ? Luc. Fire, that is closest kept, burns most of all.

Luc. Keep tune there still, so you will sing Jul. They do not love, that do not show their

it out; love.

And yet methinks, I do not like tbis tune. Luc. Oh! they love least, that let men know

Jul. You do not? their love.

Luc. No, madanr; it is too sbarp. Jul. I would I knew his mind.

Jul. Yoni, miniou, are too saucy. Luc. Pernse this paper, madam.

Luc. Nay, now you are too flat, Jul. To Julia,-Say, from whom!

And mar the concord with too barsh & det Luc. That the contents will show.

cant : Jul. Say, say; who gave it thee?

There wanteth but a mean + to fill your song. Luc. Sir Valentine's page ; aud sent, I think,

Jul. The mean is drowu'd with your warmly from Proteus :

base. He would have given it you, but I, being in the Luc. Indeed, I bid the hase for Proteas. way,

Jul. This babble shall bol benceforada uvalle Did in your name receive it ; pardon the fault,

me.

Here is a coil ġ with protestation !Jul. Now, by my modesty, a goodly broker ! .

[Tears the letter. Dare you presume to barbour wanton lives? Go, get you goue ; and let the papers bie : To whisper and conspire against my youth 1 You would be fingering ibem, to auger me. Now, trust me, 'uis an office of great worth, Luc. She makes it strange; but she would be And you an officer fit for the place.

best pleas'a There, take the paper, see it be return'd; To be so anger'd with another letter. Or else retur no more into my sight.

Jul. Nay, would I were so augerid with the Luc. To plead for love deserves more fee

same! than hate.

O hateful bands, to tear such losing words! Jul. Will you be gone ?

Injurious wasps i to feed on such sweet bobet, Luc. That you may ruminate. (Exlt. Aud kill the bees, that yield it, with your Jul. And yet I would I had o'erlook'd the

stings! letter.

I'll kiss each several paper for amends. 1t were a shame to call her back again,

And here is writ-Kind Julia ,-unkind Jala! And pray ber to a fault for which I cbid ber. As in revenge of thy ingratitude, What fool is she, that knows I am a maid, I throw thy name against the bruising stones And would not force the letter to my view ? Trampling contemptuously on thy disdain, Since maids, in modesty, say, No, to that Look, here is writ-love-toundců Protres: Which they would have the profferer construe, Poor wounded name! my bosom, as a bed, Ay.

Shall lodge thee, till thy wound be thoroughly Fie, fie ! bow wayward is this foolish love,

heal'd; That, like a testy babe, will scratch the nurse, And thus search it with a sovereign kiss. And presently, all humbled, kiss the rod ! But twice, or thrice, was Frottws written How churlishly I chid Luceita berce,

down? When willingiy I would have had her here! How angrily I taught my brow to trowa,

• Passion or obstinary.

+ The tever in musk Pase sentence. : A matchmaker. * A challeoge.

Bastle, cir

I pray:

• Talk

me home, I'll make sport with thee : Let thy!

Advancing. courtesies alone, they are scurvy ones. King. Let as from point to point this story an is well ended, if this suit be won,

The king's a beggar, now the play is done : know, To make the even truth in pleasure fow :

That you express content ; which we will I thou be'st yet a fresh uncropped flower,

pay, (To DIANA.

With strije to please you, day ecceeding Choose thou thy husband, and I'll pay the lours be your patience then, and yours our

duy: dower ; For I can guess, that, by thy honest aid,

parts ; Thou kept'st a wife bersell, thyself a maid:

Your gentle hands lend us, and take our

hearts, or that, and all the progress, more and less, Resolvedly more leisure shall express :

(Ereunt. All let seems well; and, if it end so meet, The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.

l.e. Hear us without interruption, and take our (Flourish. parte, support and defend us.

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LITERARY AND HISTORICAL NOTICE. THE opinions of commentators are divided upon this play. Hanmer supposes that some particular speechet are

Shakspeare's : Upton, that he had no hand in its production: Theobald considers it one of his worst pieces: Pope decides that the style is more natural and unaffected than our poet's usually was: and Johnson declares, that both in the serious and ludicrous scenes, the language and sentiments are Shakspeare's; and that for el bis plays have more lines or passages, which, singly considered, are eminently beautiful. One thing, box ever, appears certain---that this drama was one of his earliest efforts; that it was not very favourably received ; and that, being seldom exbibited, it escaped the corruptions and interpolations, to wbiel bis een popular performances were subjected. The incidents of the play bave not been assigned to soy details source; though it is not improbable that The Arcadia, and the common romances so much in vogue at that period, might have suggested some of them. Dr. Johnson says, that it evinces " a strange mixture of kaste ledge and iguorance, of care and negligence ;" and that the versification is often excellent--the illusiek learned and just."

DRAMATIS PERSONA. TUIR OF MILAN, Father to Silvia.

Host, where Julia lodges in Milan. + LENTINI,

OUTLAWS. PROTEUS,

} Gentlemen of Verona. A *TONIO, Father to Proteus.

JULIA, a Lady of Verona, beloved by Protexs. TLURIO, a foolish rival to Valentine.

Silvia, the Duke's Daughter, beloved by Fao TULAMOUR, Agent for Silvia in her escape.

Lentine. SPEED, a clownish Servant to Valentine,

LUCETTA, Waiting-woman to Julia.
1 * UNCE, Servant to Proteus.
PANTBINO, Servant to Antonio.

Servants, Musicians.
SCENB-sometimes in Verona, sometimes in Milan, and on the Frontiers of Mantua.

ACT I.

If ever danger do environ thee,
SCENE I.-An open place in Verona.

Commend thy grievance to my holy prayers,

For I will be thy beadsman, Valentine.
Enter VALENTINE and PROTEUS.

Val. And on a love-book pray for my success. Val. Cease to persuade, my loving Proteus ;

Pro. Upon some book i love, I'll pray for

thee. Home-keeping youth have ever bomely wits :

Val. That's on some sballow story of deep Wer't not, affection obains thy tender days

love, To the sweet glances of thy honour'd love, imber would entreat thy company,

How young Leander cross'd the Hellespont. ro ee the wonders of tbe world abroad,

Pro. That's a deep story of a deeper love ;

For be was more than over sboes in love. na living dully sluggardiz'd at home, rear out thy youth with shapeless idleness.

Val. 'Tis true ; for you are over boots in ul, since thou lovost, love still, and thrive And yet you never swam the Hellespont therein,

Pro. Over the boots ? nay, give me not the I ven as I would, when I to love begin.

boots.. Pro. Wilt thou be gone Sweet Valentine, adieu !

Val. No, I'll not, for it boots thee not.

Pro. What I Think on tby Proteus, wben thou, haply, becst

Val. To be Sore rare note-worthy object in thy travel : t'ish me partaker in ihy happiness,

In love, where scorn is bought will groans ; com

looks, when thou dost meet good hap; and, in thy danger,

* A humorouo punishurent at barvest-home feasts, &

love ;

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