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var. Be patient, York: if we conclude as

peace, It shall be with such strict and severe cove

tants, As little shall the Frenchmen gain thereby. Enter CHARLES, attended ; ALENGON, BAS

TARV), REIGNIER, and others. Char. Since, lords of England, it is thus 1 agreed,

А That peaceful truce sball be proclaim'd in P

France,
We come to be informed by yourselves

E
What the conditions of that league must be.
York. Speak, Winchester ; for boiling choler
chukes

IS The hollow passage of my poisou'd voice,

T By sight of these our baleful. eneinies.

(1 Win. Charles, and the rest, it is enacted W

thus : That-in regard king Henry gives consent,

A. Of mere compassion, and of lenity, To ease your country of distressful war,

B: And suffer you to breathe in fruitful peace, -- SI You shall become true liegemen to his crowu : And, Charles, upon Coudition thou wilt swear Tu To pay hin tribute, and submit thyself, 'Thou shalt be plac'd as viceroy under bim, And still enjoy thy regal diguity.

Th
Alen. Muist he be then as shadow of him. Ti

sell,
Adorn his temples with a coronet, +

YO
And yet, in substance and anthority,
Retaiu buit privilege of a private man?
This proffer is absurd and reasouless.

An
Char. 'Tis kuown, already, that I am pos-

sess'd
With more than half the Gallian territories, To
And therein reverenc'd for their lawful king : Ву
Shall 1, for lucre of the rest unvanquish'd,
Detract so much from that prerogative,

A)
As to be call'd but viceroy of the whole ?
No, lord ambassador ; I'll rather keep
That which I have, than, coveting for more,

He
Be cast froin possibility of all.

Alt York. Insulting Charles ! bast thou by secret means

Th
Used intercession to obtain a league ;
And, now the matter grows to compromise,

As
Stand'st thou aloot upon comparison ?

An
Either accept the title thou usurp'st,
Of benefit proceeding from our king,

Be
And not of any challenge of desert,
Or we will plagne thee with incessant wars.

Reig: My lord, you do not well in obstinacy WI
To cavil in the course of this contract :
li once it be neglected, ten to one,
We shall not find like opportunity.

Th
Alen. To say the truth, it is your policy, TO
To save your subjects from such massacre, He
And ruthless slaughters, as are daily seen

An By our proceeding in bostility :

So And therefore take this compact of a truce, As Although you break it when your pleasure Ma serves.

[Aside, to CMARLES. Th War. How say'st thou, Charles ? shall our No condition stand ?

Mu
Char. It shall :

An
Only reserv'd, you claim no interest
In any of our towns of garrison.

Pork. Then swear allegiauce to his majesty ; For
As thou art knight, neser to disobey,

AN
Nor be rebellious to the crown of England,
Thou, nor thy pobles, to the crowu of En- An

gland,
(CHARLEs, and the rest, give Tokens of Bu
feally.

He
So, now disiniss your army when ye please ; AP
Hang up your ensigns, let your drums be still,
For here we entertain a solemn peace.

(M

[Exeunt.
• Baueful.
+ Coronet is here used for crown.
"Be content to live as the beneficiary of our

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For Henry, son unto a conquerer

For your expenses and sufficient charge, Is likely to beget more conquerors,

Among the people gather up a tenth. If with a lady of so high resolve,

Be gone, I say : for, till you do return, As is fair Margaret, he be link'd in love. I rest perplexed with a thousand cares.Then yield, my lords; and here conclude with and you, good uncle, banish all offence : me,

If you do censure * me by what you were, That Margaret shall be queen, and none but Not what you are, I kpow it will excuse she.

This sudden execution of my will. K. Hen. Whether it be through force of your And so conduct me, where from company, report,

I may revolve and ruminate my grief. (Erit. My noble lord of Suffolk; or for what

Glo. Ay, grief, I fear me, both at first and My tender youth was never yet attaint

last. (Ereunt GLOSTER and EXETER. With any passion of inflaming love,

Suff. Thus Suffolk hath prevail'd: and thus he I cannot tell : but this I am assur'd,

goes, I feel such sharp dissention in my breast, As did the youthful Paris once to Greece ; Such fierce alarums both of hope and fear, With hope to find the like event in love, As I am sick with working of my thoughts. But prosper better than the Trojan did. Take, therefore, shipping; post, my lord to Margaret shall now be queen, and rule the France :

king; Agree to any covenants : and procure

But I will rule both her, the king, and realm. That lady Margaret do vouchsafe to come

(Erit. To cross the seas to England, and be crown'd King Henry's faithful and anointed queen ;

• Judge.

SECOND

OF

KING HE

LITERARY AND HIST SHAKSI'EARE is said to have formed this and the succee

entitled, The Contention of the two famous Houses of York ing," as his genius or his judgment suggested. The pre commencing with the king's inarriage, A. D. 1445, and York faction, A. D. 16.

DRAMATIS PE KING HENRY THE SIXTH.

Во HUMPHREY, Duke of Gloster, his Uncle. A CARDINAL BEAUFORT, Bishop of Winchester, T Great Uncle to the King.

P RICHARD PLANTAGENET, Duke of York. C1 EDWARD and RICHARD, his Sons.

M DUKE OF SOMERSET,

SI DUKE OF SUFFOLK,

TV DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM,

Of the King's

JA LORD CLIFFORD,

Party.

GI YOUNG CLIFFORD, his Son,

AL WARWICK, LORD SCALES, Governor of the Tower.

M М. LORD SAY.

EI SIR HUMPHREY STAFFORD, and his Brother. M Sur JOHN STANLEY.

W A SEA-CAPTAIN, MASTER, MASTER'S MATE, and WALTER WHITMORE

Lc Two GENTLEMEN, Prisoners with Suffolk. A HERALD.-VAUÍ. HUME and SOUTHWELL, Iwo Priests.

EARL OF SWTex; }of the York Faction

SCENE, dispersedly in vario

ACT I.

I

AI SCENE 1.-London.--A Rooms of State in in the Palace.

1

TO Flourish of Trumpets: then Hautboys.

En. ter, on one side, King HENRY, Duke of GLOSTER, SALISBURY, WARWICK, and Car.

TI dinal BEAUFORT ; on the other, Queen

TL
MARGARET, led in by SUFFOLK ; York, Som-
ERSET, BUCKINGHAM, and others, follow-
ing.

I
Suf. As by your high imperial majesty, ΤΙ
1 bad in harge at my depart for France,
As procurator to your excellence,

LO To inarry princess Margaret for your grace ; FC So, in the famous ancient city, Tours, In presence of the kings of France and Sicil, The dukes of Orleans, Calaber, Bretaigne, and 11 Alençon,

(bishops, Seven caris, twelve barons, twenty reverend

A

tears.

The mutual conference that my mind hath or hath my uncle Beaufort, and myself, had

With all the learned council of the realın, By day, by night, waking, and in my dreams, Studied so long, sat in the council-house, la courtly company, or at my beads,

Early and late, debating to and fro With you mine alder-liefest + sovereign,

How France and Frenchmen might be kept Makes me the bolder to salute my kiug

in awe ? With ruder terms ; such as my wit affords, And hath his bighness in his infancy And over-joy of heart doth minister.

Been crown'd in Paris, in despite of foes ? K. Hen. Her sight did ravish : but her grace and shall these labours, and these hovours, in speech,

die? Her words y-clad with wisdom's majestys Shall Henry's conquest, Bedford's vigilance, Makes me, from wondering fall to weeping Your deeds of war, and all our counsel, die ? joys,

O peers of England, shameful is this league ! Such is the fulness of my heart's content.-. Fatal this marriage, cancelling your fame; Lords, with one cheerful voice, welcome my Blotting your names from books of memory; love.

Razing the characters of your renown; AU. Long live queen Margaret, England's Defacing monuments of conquer'd France ; happiness!

Undoing all, as all had never been ! Q. Mar. We thank you all. (Flourish. Car. Nephew, what means this passionate disSuf. My lord protector, so it please your

course ? grace,

This peroration with such circumstance? * Here are the articles of contracted peace, For France, 'tis our's : and we will keep it still. Between our sovereign and the French king Glo. Ay, uncle, we will keep it, if we cau; Charles,

But now it is impossible we should : For eighteen months concluded by consent. Suffolk, the new-made duke that rules the Glo. (Reads.) Imprimis, It is agreed be.

roast, treen the French King, Charles, and Wild Hath given the dutchies of Anjou and Maine lion de la Poole, marquis of Suffolk, ambas. Unto the poor king Reignier, wbose large style sador for Henry king of England, that the Agrees not with the leanness of his purse. said Henry shall espouse the ludy Margaret, Sal. Now, by the death of him that died for daughter unto Reignier king of Naples, Si

all, cilia, and Jerusalem ; and crown her queen These counties were the keys of Normandy :of England, ere the thirtieth of May next But wherefore

weeps Warwick, my valiant ensuing.--Item,- That the dutchy of Anjou

son ? and the county of Maine, shall be released War. For grief, that they are past recovery: and delivered to the king her father

For, were there hope to conquer them again, K. Hen. Uncle, how now?

My sword should shed hot blood, mine eyes no Glo. Pardon me, gracious lord ; Some sudden qualm hath struck me at the Anjou and Maine ! myself did win them both ; heart,

Those provinces these arms of mine did con. And dimm'd mine eyes, that I can read no

quer : further.

And are the cities, that I got with wounds, K. Hen. Uncle of Winchester, I pray, read Deliver'd up again with peaceful words? on.

Mort Dieu ! win. Item, It is further agreed between York. For Suffolk's duke---may be be suffo. them, that the dutchies of Anjou and Maine

cate, skall be released and delivered over to the That dins the honour of this warlike isle ! king her futher; and she sent over of the king France should have torn and rent my very of England's oun proper cost and charges,

beart, teitdout having dowry.

Before I would have yielded to this league. K. Hen. They please us well.-Lord mar. I never read but England's kings have bad quis, kneel down ;

Large sims of gold, and dowries, with their We here create thee the first duke of Suffolk,

wives : Aed girt thee with the sword.

And our king Henry gives away his own, Cousin of York, we bere discharge your grace

To inatch with her that brings no vantages. From being reg-nt in the parts of France, Glo. A proper jest, and never beard before, Tul term of eighteen months be full expir'd. That Sutfolk should demand a whole filleouth, 1 lauks, uncle Winchester, Gloster, York, and for costs and charges in transporting her! Buckingham,

She sbould have staid in France, aud stary'd in Somerset, Salisbury, and Warwick :

France, We thank you all for this great favour done, Beforela entertainment to my princely queen.

Cur. My lord of Gloster, now you grow too Cane, let us in ; and with all speed provide To see ber coronation be perform’d.

It was the pleasure of my lord the king. (Exeunt KINO, QUEEN, und SUFFOLK. Glo. My lord of Winchester, I know your Glo. Brave peers of England, pillars of the

mind ; state,

'Tis not my speeches that you do mislike, To you doke Humphrey mnst mload his grief, But 'uis my pr sence that doth trouble you. Yoor grief, the common grief of all the land. Rancour will out : Proud prelate, in thy face what! did toy brother Henry spend his youth, I see thy fury: if I longer stay, His valour, coin, and people, in the wars? We shall begin our ancient bickerings. +Did he so often lodge in open field,

Lordwgs, farewell; and say, when I am gone, lo winter's cold, and sominer's parching heat, I prophesied-France will be lost ere luog. To anquet France, bis true iuberitance ?

(Erit. And did my brother Bedford toil bis wits,

Car. So, there goes our protector in a rage. 19 kerp by policy what Henry got?

'Tis known to you be is mine enemy : Have you yourselves, Somerset, Buckingbam, Nay, more, au ebemy unto you all; Erave York, Salisbury, and victorious War. And no great friend, I fear me, to the king. wick,

Consider, lords, he is the next of blood,
Receir'd deep scars in France and Normandy? And heir apparent to the English Crowli;

Had Heury got an empire by bis marriage,
I am the boller to address rou, having already fa
Punet ou to my imagination.

+ Belored • This speech crowded with so many circumstances of te all this

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And all the wealthy kingdoms of the west,
There's reason he shouid be displeas'd at it.
Look to it, lords : let not bis smoothing words
Bewitch your hearts : be wise, and circun-
spect.

TO What though the common people favour him, Calling him-Humphrey,' the good duke of 1

Gloster ; Clapping their hands, and crying with loud PA

voice
Jesu maintain your royal excellence !
With-God preserve the good duke Humph-

rey!
I fear me, lords, for all this flattering gloss,
He will be found a dangerous protector.
Buck. Why should he then protect our sove-

reign,
He being of age to govern of himself?
Cousin of Somerset, join you with me,

R. And all together, with the duke of Suffolk, We'll quickly boise duke Humphrey from his w

seat. Car. This weighty business will not brook M delay ;

Bt
I'll to the duke of Suffolk presently. [Erit. As
Som. Cousin of Buckingham, thongh Hum. Un

pbrey's pride,
And greatness of his place be grief to us,
Yet let its watch the baughty cardinal;

Ev
His insolence is more intolerable
Tban all the princes in the land beside ;
Ti Gloster be displac'd, he'll be protector.

An
Buck. Or thou, or i, Somerset, will be pro- All

tector, Despight duke Humphrey, or the cardinal. An

(Ereunt BUCKINGHAM and SOMERSET. FO Sal. Pride went before, ambition follows No him,

NC
While these do labour for their own prefer. No

ment,
Behoves it us to labour for the realm.

TE
I never saw but Humphrey duke of Gloster
Did bear bim like a noble gentleman.

To
Oft have I seen the haughty cardinal,'

Ti
More like a soldier than a man o'the church, W
As stout, and proud as be were lord of all,
Swear like a ruffian, and demean himself

Αι
Unlike the ruler of a common-weal.
Warwick, my son, the comfort of my age !

TH
Thy deeds, thy plainness, and thy house-keeping, w
Hath won the greatest favour of the commons,
Excepting none but good duke Humphrey.-
And, brother York, thy acts in Ireland,

TU
In bringing them to civil discipline ;

AI
Thy late exploits, done in the heart of France,
When thou wert regent for our sovereign,

W
Have made thee fear'd and honour'd of the

people :-
Join we together for the public good :

SC
In what we can to bridle and suppress
The pride of Suffolk and the cardinal,
With Somerset's and Buckingham's ambition ;
And, as we may, cherish” duke Humphrey's

deeds,
While they do tend the profit of the land. Ha
War. So God help Warwick, as he loves the

land, And common profit of his country! York. And so says York, for he hath greatest w

cause Sal. Then let's make haste away, and look W

anto the main. War. Unto the main ! O father, Maine is 11 That Maine, which by main force, Warwick P

did win,
And would have kept, so long as breath did w
Main chance, father, you meant; but I meant w

Maine ;
Which I will win from France, or else be slain.

[Exeunt WARWICK and SALISBURY.
York. Anjou and Maine are given to the

French;

W

Jost;

last:

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