Imagini ale paginilor
PDF
ePub

(6) Petition for alien to perform temporary nonagricultural services or labor (H-2B)-(i) General. An H-2B nonagricultural temporary worker is an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States to perform temporary services or labor, is not displacing United States workers capable of performing such services or labor, and whose employment is not adversely affecting the wages and working conditions of United States workers.

(ii) Temporary services or labor—(A) Definition. Temporary services or labor under the H-2B classification refers to any job in which the petitioner's need for the duties to be performed by the employee(s) is temporary, whether or not the underlying job can be described as permanent or temporary.

(B) Nature of petitioner's need. As a general rule, the period of the petitioner's need must be a year or less, although there may be extraordinary circumstances where the temporary services or labor might last longer than one year. The petitioner's need for the services or labor shall be a one-time occurrence, a seasonal need, a peakload need, or an intermittent need:

(1) One-time occurence. The petitioner must establish that it has not employed workers to perform the services or labor in the past and that it will not need workers to perform the services or labor in the future, or that it has an employment situation that is otherwise permanent, but a temporary event of short duration has created the need for a temporary worker.

(2) Seasonal need. The petitioner must establish that the services or labor is traditionally tied to a season of the year by an event or pattern and is of a recurring nature. The petitioner shall specify the period(s) of time during each year in which it does not need the services or labor. The employment is not seasonal if the period during which the services or labor is not needed is unpredictable or subject to change or is considered a vacation period for the petitioner's permanent employees.

(3) Peakload need. The petitoner must establish that it regularly employs permanent workers to perform the services or labor at the place of employment and that it needs to supplement its permanent staff at the place of em

ployment on a temporary basis due to a seasonal or short-term demand and that the temporary additions to staff will not become a part of the petitioner's regular operation.

(4) Intermittent need. The petitioner must establish that it has not employed permanent or full-time workers to perform the services or labor, but occasionally or intermittently needs temporary workers to perform services or labor for short periods.

(iii) Procedures. (A) Prior to filing a petition with the director to classify an alien as an H-2B worker, the petitioner shall apply for a temporary labor certification with the Secretary of Labor for all areas of the United States, except the Territory of Guam. In the Territory of Guam, the petitioning employer shall apply for a temporary labor certification with the Governor of Guam. The labor certification shall be advice to the director on whether or not United States workers capable of performing the temporary services or labor are available and whether or not the alien's employment will adversely affect the wages and working conditions of similarly employed United States workers.

(B) An H-2B petitioner shall be a United States employer, a United States agent, or a foreign employer filing through a United States agent. For purposes of paragraph (h) of this section, a foreign employer is any employer who is not amendable to service of process in the United States. A foreign employer may not directly petition for an H-2B nonimmigrant but must use the services of a United States agent to file a petition for an H2B nonimmigrant. A United States agent petitioning on behalf of a foreign employer must be authorized to file the petition, and to accept service of process in the United States in proceedings under section 274A of the Act, on behalf of the employer. The petitioning employer shall consider available United States workers for the temporary services or labor, and shall offer terms and conditions of employment which are consistent with the nature of the occupation, activity, and industry in the United States.

(C) The petitioner may not file an H2B petition unless the United States petitioner has applied for a labor certification with the Secretary of Labor or the Governor of Guam within the time limits prescribed or accepted by each, and has obtained a labor certification determination as required by paragraph (h)(6)(iv) or (h)(6)(v) of this section.

(D) The Secretary of Labor and the Governor of Guam shall separately establish procedures for administering the temporary labor certification program under his or her jurisdiction.

(E) After obtaining a determination from the Secretary of Labor or the Governor of Guam, as appropriate, the petitioner shall file a petition on I-129, accompanied by the labor certification determination and supporting documents, with the director having jurisdiction in the area of intended employment.

(iv) Labor certifications, except Guam(A) Secretary of Labor's determination. An H-2B petition for temporary employment in the United States, except for temporary employment on Guam, shall be accompanied by a labor certification determination that is either:

(1) A certification from the Secretary of Labor stating that qualified workers in the United States are not available and that the alien's employment will not adversely affect wages and working conditions of similary employed United States workers; or

(2) A notice detailing the reasons why such certification cannot be made. Such notice shall address the availability of U.S. workers in the occupation and the prevailing wages and working conditions of U.S. workers in the occupation.

(B) Validity of the labor certification. The Secretary of Labor may issue a temporary labor certification for a period of up to one year.

(C) U.S. Virgin Islands. Temporary labor certifications filed under section 101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(b) of the Act for employment in the United States Virgin Islands may be approved only for entertainers and athletes and only for periods not to exceed 45 days.

(D) Attachment to petition. If the petitioner receives a notice from the Secretary of Labor that certification cannot be made, a petition containing countervailing evidence may be filed

with the director. The evidence must show that qualified workers in the United States are not available, and that the terms and conditions of employment are consistent with the nature of the occupation, activity, and industry in the United States. All such evidence submitted will be considered in adjudicating the petition.

(E) Countervailing evidence. The countervailing evidence presented by the petitioner shall be in writing and shall address availability of U.S. workers, the prevailing wage rate for the occupation of the United States, and each of the reasons why the Secretary of Labor could not grant a labor certification. The petitioner may also submit other appropriate information in support of the petition. The director, at his or her discretion, may require additional supporting evidence.

(v) Labor certification for Guam-(A) Governor of Guam's determination. An H2B petition for temporary employment on Guam shall be accompanied by a labor certification determination that is either:

(1) A certification from the Governor of Guam stating that qualified workers in the United States are not available to perform the required services, and that the alien's employment will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of United States resident workers who are similarly employed on Guam; or

(2) A notice detailing the reasons why such certification cannot be made. Such notice shall address the availability of U.S. workers in the occupation and/or the prevailing wages and working conditions of U.S. workers in the occupation.

(B) Validity of labor certification. The Governor of Guam may issue a temporary labor certification for a period up to one year.

(C) Attachments to petition. If the employer receives a notice from the Governor of Guam that certification cannot be made, a petition containing countervailing evidence may be filed with the director. The evidence must show that qualified workers in the United States are not available, and that the terms and conditions of employment are consistent with the nature of the occupation, activity, and industry in the United States. All such evidence submitted will be considered in adjudicating the petition.

(D) Countervailing evidence. The countervailing evidence presented by the petitioner shall be in writing and shall address availability of United States workers, the prevailing wage rate, and each of the reasons why the Governor of Guam could not make the required certification. The petitioner may also provide any other appropriate information in support of the petition. The director, at his or her discretion, may require additional supporting evidence.

(E) Criteria for Guam labor certifications. The Governor of Guam shall, in consultation with the Service, establish systematic methods for determining the prevailing wage rates and working conditions for individual occupations on Guam and for making determinations as to availability of qualified United States residents.

(1) Prevailing wage and working conditions. The system to determine wages and working conditions must provide for consideration of wage rates and employment conditions for occupations in both the private and public sectors, in Guam and/or in the United States (as defined in section 101(a)(38) of the Act), and may not consider wages and working conditions outside of the United States. If the system includes utilitzation of advisory opinions and consultations, the opinions must be provided

by officially sanctioned groups which reflect a balance of the interests of the private and public sectors, government, unions and management.

(2) Availability of United States workers. The system for determining availability of qualified United States workers must require the prospective employer to:

(i) Advertise the availability of the position for a minimum of three consecutive days in the newspaper with the largest daily circulation on Guam;

(ii) Place a job offer with an appropriate agency of the Territorial Goyernment which operates as a job referral service at least 30 days in advance of the need for the services to commence, except that for applications from the armed forces of the United States and those in the entertainment

industry, the 30-day period may be reduced by the Governor to 10 days;

(iii) Conduct appropriate recruitment in other areas of the United and its territories if sufficient qualified United States construction workers are not available on Guam to fill a job. The Governor of Guam may require a job order to be placed more than 30 days in advance of need to accommodate such recruitment;

(iv) Report to the appropriate agency the names of all United States resident workers who applied for the position, indicating those hired and the job-related reasons for not hiring;

(v) Offer all special considerations, such as housing and transportation expenses, to all United States resident workers who applied for the position, indicating those hired and the job-related reasons for not hiring;

(vi) Meet the prevailing wage rates and working conditions determined under the wages and working conditions system by the Governor; and

(vii) Agree to meet all Federal and Territorial requirements relating to employment, such as nondiscrimination, occupational safety, and minimum wage requirements.

(F) Approval and publication of employment systems on Guam—(1) Systems. The Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization must approve the system to determine prevailing wages and working conditions and the system to determine availability of United States resident workers and any future modifications of the systems prior to implementation. If the Commissioner, in consultation with the Secretary of Labor, finds that the systems or modified systems meet the requirements of this section, the Commissioner shall publish them as a notice in the FEDERAL REGISTER and the Governor shall publish them as a public record in Guam.

(2) Approval of construction wage rates. The Commissioner must approve specific wage data and rates used for construction occupations on Guam prior to implementation of new rates. The Governor shall submit new wage survey data and proposed rates to the Commissioner for approval at least eight weeks before authority to use existing rates expires. Surveys shall be

conducted at least every two years, unless the Commissioner prescribes a lesser period.

(G) Reporting. The Governor shall provide the Commissioner statistical data on temporary labor certification workload and determinations. This information shall be submitted quarterly no later than 30 days after the quarter ends.

(H) Invalidation of temporary labor certification issued by the Governor of Guam—(1) General. A temporary labor certification issued by the Governor of Guam may be invalidated by a director if it is determined by the director or a court of law that the certification request involved fraud or willful misrepresentation. A temporary labor certification may also be invalidated if the director determines that the certification involved gross error.

(2) Notice of intent to invalidate. If the director intends to invalidate a temporary labor certification, a notice of intent shall be served upon the employer, detailing the reasons for the intended invalidation. The employer shall have 30 days in which to file a written response in rebuttal to the notice of intent. The director shall consider all evidence submitted upon rebuttal in reaching a decision.

(3) Appeal of invalidation. An employer may appeal the invalidation of a temporary labor certification in accordance with part 103 of this chapter.

(vi) Evidence for H-2B petitions. An H2B petition shall be accompanied by:

(A) Labor certification or notice. A temporary labor certification or a notice that certification cannot be made, issued by the Secretary of Labor or the Governor of Guam, as appropriate;

(B) Countervailing evidence. Evidence to rebut the Secretary of Labor's or the Governor of Guam's notice that certification cannot be made, if appropriate;

(C) Alien's qualifications. Documentation that the alien qualifies for the job offer as specified in the application for labor certification, except in petitions where the labor certification application requires no education, training, experience, or special requirements of the beneficiary; and

(D) Statement of need. A statement describing in detail the temporary situa

tion or conditions which make it necessary to bring the alien to the United States and whether the need is a onetime occurrence, seasonal, peakload, or intermittent. If the need is seasonal, peakload, or intermittent, the statement shall indicate whether the situation or conditions are expected to be recurrent.

(E) Liability for transportation costs. The employer will be liable for the reasonable costs of return transportation of the alien abroad, if the alien is dismissed from employment for any reason by the employer before the end of the period of authorized admission pursuant to section 214(c)(5) of the Act. If the beneficiary voluntarily terminates his or her employment prior to the expiration of the validity of the petition, the alien has not been dismissed. If the beneficiary believes that the employer has not complied with this provision, the beneficiary shall advise the Service Center which adjudicated the petition in writing. The complaint will be retained in the file relating to the petition. Within the context of this paragraph, the term "abroad” means the alien's last place of foreign residence. This provision applies to any employer whose offer of employment became the basis for the alien obtaining or continuing H-2B status.

(vii) Traded professional H-2B athletes. In the case of a professional H-2B athlete who is traded from one organization or another organization, employ. ment authorization for the player will automatically continue for a period of 30 days after the player's acquisition by the new organization, within which time the new organization is expected to file a new Form I-129 for H-2B nonimmigrant classification. If a

new Form I-129 is not filed within 30 days, employment authorization will cease. If a new Form I-129 is filed within 30 days, the professional athlete shall be deemed to be in valid H-2B status, and employment shall continue to be authorized, until the petition is adjudicated. If the new petition is denied, employment authorization will cease.

(7) Petition for alien trainee or participant in a special education exchange visitor program (H-3)(i) Alien trainee. The H-3 trainee is a nonimmigrant who seeks to enter the United States at the

nec

invitation of an organization or individual for the purpose of receiving training in any field of endeavor, such as agriculture, commerce, communications, finance, government, transportation, or the professions, as well as training in a purely industrial establishment. This category shall not apply to physicians, who are statutorily ineligible to use H-3 classification in order to receive any type of graduate medical education or training.

(A) Externs. A hospital approved by the American Medical Association or the American Osteopathic Association for either an internship or residency program may petition to classify as an H-3 trainee a medical student attending a medical school abroad, if the alien will engage in employment as an extern during his/her medical school vacation.

(B) Nurses. A petitioner may seek H3 classification for a nurse who is not H-1 if it can be established that there is a genuine need for the nurse to receive a brief period of training that is unavailable in the alien's native country and such training is designed to benefit the nurse and the overseas employer upon the nurse's return to the country of origin, if:

(1) The beneficiary has obtained a full and unrestricted license to practice professional nursing in the country where the beneficiary obtained a nursing education, or such education was obtained in the United States or Canada; and

(2) The petitioner provides a statement certifying that the beneficiary is fully qualified under the laws governing the place where the training will be received to engage in such training, and that under those laws the petitioner is authorized to give the beneficiary the desired training.

(ii) Evidence required for petition involving alien trainee-(A) Conditions. The petitioner is required to demonstrate that:

(1) The proposed training is not available in the alien's own country;

(2) The beneficiary will not be placed in a position which is in the normal operation of the business and in which citizens and resident workers are regularly employed;

(3) The beneficiary will not engage in productive employment unless such employment is incidental and essary to the training; and

(4) The training will benefit the beneficiary in pursuing a career outside the United States.

(B) Description of training program. Each petition for a trainee must include a statement which:

(1) Describes the type of training and supervision to be given, and the structure of the training program;

(2) Sets forth the proportion of time that will be devoted to productive employment;

(3) Shows the number of hours that will be spent, respectively, in classroom instruction and in on-the-job training;

(4) Describes the career abroad for which the training will prepare the alien;

(5) Indicates the reasons why such training cannot be obtained in the alien's country and why it is necessary for the alien to be trained in the United States; and

(6) Indicates the source of any remuneration received by the trainee and any benefit which will accrue to the petitioner for providing the training.

(iii) Restrictions on training program for alien trainee. A training program may not be approved which:

(A) Deals in generalities with no fixed schedule, objectives, or means of evaluation;

(B) Is incompatible with the nature of the petitioner's business or enterprise;

(C) Is on behalf of a beneficiary who already possesses substantial training and expertise in the proposed field of training;

(D) Is in a field in which it is unlikely that the knowledge or skill will be used outside the United States;

(E) Will result in productive employment beyond that which is incidental and necessary to the training;

(F) Is designed to recruit and train aliens for the ultimate staffing of domestic operations in the United States;

(G) Does not establish that the petitioner has the physical plant and sufficiently trained manpower to provide the training specified; or

« ÎnapoiContinuați »