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costly. There must also be provision for underground connection with the main building. Experience has made possible a reasonably close estimate by the Librarian and the Architect of the Capitol, who are of the belief that about $6,500,000 will be needed. Although the work of acquiring the land, now under way, will take some time yet, it is desirable that while it is in progress the preparations for the new building in the way of working plans, detailed estimates, etc., should be made, that as little time as possible be lost. Accessions are coming into the Library at the rate of more than 200,000 a year, and unless the annex can be completed within three years the congestion will be very serious, we are informed. So it seems to your committee a matter of genuine importance that the full appropriation be at once authorized, in order that there may be speedily available the comparatively small part of it necessary for a start.

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APPROPRIATION FOR FEDERAL RADIO COMMISSION

JANUARY 28, 1930.—Committeed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Wood, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. J. Res. 217)

The Committee on Appropriations, to whom was referred the joint resolution (H. J. Res. 217) making an additional appropriation for the support of the Federal Radio Commission during the fiscal year 1930 in accordance with the act approved December 18, 1929, having considered the same, report it without amendment and with a recommendation for its immediate consideration and passage.

The amount recommended in the resolution, namely, $31,000 of direct appropriation and $75,000 of reappropriated funds, totaling $106,000, is based upon an estimate transmitted by the President in House Document No. 241 of the present session.

Appropriations for the Federal Radio Commission for the current fiscal year were based upon the commission assuming a status as an appellant body on January 1, 1930, and the administrative functions reverting to the Department of Commerce on that date. By the act of December 18, 1929, however, Congress has continued the commission as an administrative and regulatory body indefinitely. The commission therefore has continued to operate as an administrative agency since that date. The funds previously appropriated have been entirely exhausted due to this change in the situation and the amounts in this joint resolution are essential in order that the commission may meet its pay rolls for this month and have funds on hand with which to operate for the remainder of the current fiscal

year.

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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

71 ST CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 551

COMBINED SEWER AND SUBMARINE CABLE UNDER

GRAND RIVER, MICH.

JANUARY 29, 1930.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

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Mr. MAPEs, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com

merce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 8712)

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8712) to legalize a combined sewer and submarine cable constructed under the Grand River near the pumping station on Market Avenue at Grand Rapids, Mich., having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

The bill has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the letter attached and which is made a part of this report.

War DEPARTMENT, January 24, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committeed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill, H. R. 8712, Seventy-first Congress, second session, to legalize a combined sewer and submarine cable constructed under the Grand River near the pumping station on Market Avenue at Grand Rapids, Mich.

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

CONSTRUCTION OF RURAL POST ROADS

JANUARY 29, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Colton, from the Committee on Roads, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 7585]

The Committee on Roads, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7585) to amend the act entitled “An act to provide that the United States shall aid the States in the construction of rural post roads, and for other purposes," approved July 11, 1916, as amended and supplemented, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report it to the House favorably and recommend that it do pass without amendment.

For a number of years Congress has been making authorizations for the construction of the roads on the Federal-aid system through the national forests. However, the Federal Government is still many years behind in its road-building program even through the national forest as compared with the States in the completion of the other roads on the Federal-aid system. The Federal-aid system in many of the States outside of the forests and public domain is practically completed but it will take the Federal Government an average of 43 years to build the roads on the Federal-aid system through the forests as the program is now being carried out.

When we turn to the consideration of roads through unappropriated or unreserved public lands and nontaxable Indian lands, we find the situation even worse. There has been no special provision whatever for building roads through these lands, yet there are almost 100,000 square miles of unappropriated and unreserved public lands in the Western States in excess of the square miles of forest areas.

This bill amends the act approved July 11, 1916, and would make it possible for Congress in the future, after an authorization bill has been passed, to appropriate for the construction of roads across the unreserved and unappropriated public lands in the United States. This money could only be used in a State having in excess of 5 per cent of the total area of all its lands in unappropriated public lands and nontaxable Indian lands, and will be apportioned in these States in the proportion that said public lands, in each of said States, is to the total area of said lands in the State eligible under the provisions of this section.

Your committee was impressed with the testimony of the highway officials from the Western States that it is impossible to raise the money by taxation to build many of the connecting links of the Federal-aid system where these roads cross the unreserved lands. The country is so sparsely settled and the amount of taxable property so small that money can not be raised by local taxation. If our continental roads are to be completed and many approaches to forest reservations and parks constructed, legislation of this character is absolutely necessary.

The map given below visualizes the extent of territory unappropriated—forest, Indian, and national park lands-owned or controlled by the Federal Government in the 11 Western States.

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CHART SHOWING PROPORTIONAL AREAS OF NON-TAXABLE

FEDERAL LANDS AND OF STATE LANDS
SHADED AREAS = PROPORTION OF NONTAXABLE LANDS

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