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SALARY OF MINISTER TO LIBERIA

FEBRUARY 18, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. PORTER, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9991)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 9991) to fix the salary of the minister to Liberia, having considered the same, reports it to the House with the recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

A bill identical with this passed the House in the last Congress but failed to receive action in the Senate prior to adjournment.

The facts in reference to this bill are fully set forth in a message from the President of the United States dated February 13, 1930, which is appended hereto and made a part of this report.

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report by the Acting Secretary of State recommending legislation authorizing an increase in the salary of the minister resident and consul general of the United States to Liberia from $5,000 to $10,000 per annum.

I am in full accord with the reasons advanced by the Acting Secretary of State in support of the increase and I strongly urge upon the Congress the enactment of legislation authorizing it.

HERBERT HOOVER. The White House, February 13, 1930.

The PRESIDENT:

The undersigned, the Acting Secretary of State, has the honor to bring to the President's attention the matter of the salary of the minister resident and consul general of the United States to Liberia and to recommend that Congress be requested to enact legislation which will authorize an increase thereof to $10,000 per annum. In support of this recommendation, the following facts are submitted:

The salary of $5,000 now appropriated for this office is inadequate and is disproportionate to the salaries paid to the classified Foreign Service officers of the United States and is less than that received by any other foreign representative in Monrovia, none of whom has a higher grade than chargé d'affaires, as those who do not have salaries equal to that of the American representative have the benefit of allotments and perquisites. Thus, in 1925–26, the British consul general and the German consul at Monrovia each received a salary of $7,500 per annum and in addition entertainment and household allowances. In 1926–27, the British consul general received $9,272 salary, $2,196 local allowance, amounting to $11,468, more than double the entire compensation of the American minister and consul general, and in addition thereto a house is provided for him. The British vice consul, a subordinate official, receives, if married, only about $400 per annum less than the American consul general, whose salary is $5,000.

The British Legation, owned and furnished by the British Government, is an elaborate 2-story concrete building with 14 rooms and appurtenances. Germany, France, and Spain also provide quarters for their representatives.

The United States has a number of definite interests in Liberia, all of which the American minister must maintain and advance. Liberia began under American auspices, having been colonized by slaves freed in this country. Liberia has always regarded the United States as her next friend, and on numerous occasions the United States has employed her good offices to assist Liberia politically, financially, and economically. There are also extensive American missionary interests involving about 100 American missionaries, both white and colored, with an estimated investment of $500,000 and a yearly budget of $300,000. American capital is being invested on a large scale in the development of rubber plantations. An American concession permits the planting of 1,000,000 acres, which is now being developed at the rate of about 20,000 acres per year and at an approximate cost of $1,000,000 annually. There is a $5,000,000 loan to Liberia placed in America and secured by American receivership of customs under the direction of an American bank and assisted by an American financial adviser.

The American minister and consul general to Liberia is required to perform both diplomatic and consular functions, and for this dual service he receives a salary of but $5,000 per annum, which is $5,000 less than is paid to any other minister of the United States, $4,000 less than is paid to Foreign Service officers of Class I, $3,000 less than is paid to Foreign Service officers of Class II, $2,000 less than is paid to Foreign Service officers of Class III, $1,000 less than is paid to Foreign Service officers of Class IV, and is equal only to the salaries paid to Foreign Service officers of Class V, which comprises no consul general and no diplomatic officer of higher grade than that of second secretary. That a minister accredited to a foreign government should receive a salary no larger than that received by a second secretary of legation is an anomaly in the Foreign Service of the United States, which, in the view of the undersigned, should, in fairness to the minister and for the sake of uniformity in the Foreign Service, be corrected.

The duties of the American minister resident and consul general are in all respects similar to those performed by other American ministers and may be fairly compared to those performed by such ministers at posts in the smaller Latin-American countries. These ministers all receive $10,000 annually.

Moreover, with the cost of living at Monrovia for a foreigner being even higher than it is in the United States, it is impossible for the American minister, unless he be a man of large independent means, to meet the requirements of diplomatic life and his family necessities on the small salary now granted to the post. Respectfully submitted.

J. P. COTTON.

Acting Secretary of State. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 10, 1930.

ADD CERTAIN LANDS TO THE HELENA NATIONAL

FOREST IN THE STATE OF MONTANA

FEBRUARY 18, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Evans of Montana, from the Committee on the Public Lands,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 4810)

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 4810) to add certain lands to the Helena National Forest, in the State of Montana, report thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

This bill is intended to correct a typographical error occurring in the act of May 17, 1928 (70th Cong.). The tracts of lands involved in this bill contain 800 acres and are entirely surrounded by the national forest, and it was intended by the act of May 17, 1928, to include these with other lands in the national forest.

The act of May 17, 1928, as it passed the House and Senate, included the 800 acres herein mentioned but by a typographical error in the enrolled bill the lands herein mentioned were omitted from said act of May 17, 1928.

The bill as herein reported has the recommendation of the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior, as shown by the following correspondence:

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

January 17, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. COLTON: Receipt is acknowledge of your letter of December 13 inclosing copy of H. R. 4810, "A bill to add certain lands to the Helena National Forest in the State of Montana,” and asking for a report thereon.

The proposed legislation would place under national-forest administration as a part of the Helena National Forest, Mont., 800 acres of described land. The particular subdivisions were included among others which the National Forest Reservation Commission recommended on January 8, 1927, be given a nationalforest status. The recommendation of the commission was transmitted to Congress by the President on January 18, 1927, and will be found in House Document No. 668, Sixty-ninth Congress, second session. Subsequently, that is on May 17, 1928 (45 Stat. 598), a bill was enacted adding to the Missoula National Forest certain described lands, and this was intended to cover the lands included in the recommendation of the National Forest Reservation Commission above mentioned. Through a typographical error the lands described in the bill now under consideration were omitted from the act of May 17, 1928. These lands lie well within the boundaries of the present Helena National Forest and are the same in character as the surrounding lands which have been placed under national-forest administration.

The department recommends favorable consideration of H. R. 4810. The enactment of this proposed legislation will not add to the cost of administering the Helena National Forest. Sincerely yours,

ARTHUR M. HYDE, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, January 19, 1930. Hon. Don B. Colton, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: With further reference to your request of December 13 for a report on H. R. 4810, which would add certain lands to the Helena National Forest, in the State of Montana, I transmit herewith a memorandum from the Commissioner of the General Land Office. After a review of the measure, I concur with Commissioner Moore in his favorable recommendation. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, January 10, 1930. Memorandum for the Secretary.

I have by departmental reference request of the chairman of the Committee of the Public Lands of the House for report on H. R. 4810.

The bill would include in the Helena-National Forest certain lands in sections 14 and 22, township 14 north, range 6 west, Montana. The lands are surrounded by the national forest, contain 800 acres, and 480 acres thereof are shown by the records of this office to be unappropriated and public, title to the remainder having passed from the Government. The legislation proposed would extend the provisions of the national forest consolidation law of March 20, 1922 (42 Stat. 465), as amended, over the privately owned lands in the areas involved.

The Department of Agriculture under date of January 3 refers to the bill and calls attention to the fact that these areas were described in the recommendation of the National Forest Reservation Commission for addition to the forest, found in House Document No. 668 of the Sixty-ninth Congress, second session, which has the approval of this department, but through an error in punctuation were not included in the forest by the act of May 17, 1928 (145 Stat. 598), based upon such recommendation. I therefore see no objection to the enactment of the bill.

C. C. MOORE, Commissioner.

EXEMPT FROM CANCELLATION CERTAIN DESERT-LAND

ENTRIES IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIF.

FEBRUARY 19, 1930.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. SWING, from the Committee on the Public Lands, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6809]

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred H. R. 6809, a bill to exempt from cancellation certain desert-land entries in Riverside County, Calif., having fully considered the same, report the same back to the House with favorable recommendation that the same do pass with the following amendment:

Line 15, page 2, strike ont "3" and insert "5".

The desert-land entries in question were made some years ago when there was a local movement on foot to build an irrigation system and bring water from the Colorado River to the lands described in the bill. Before the plan could materialize the greater project embraced in the Boulder Dam scheme came to the front, with the result that the entrymen desired to await the completion of that project and take their water under that scheme. The plans that they had proposed might not fit into the general scheme which will develop under the Boulder Dam project. If not, considerable money would be wasted.

At the present time these lands are desert lands on which nothing will grow and they will have no value until water can be brought from the Colorado River. Money expended at this time in making final proof will be a total loss to the individual entrymen and of no benefit to the United States Government. The delay, therefore, will not hurt the Government and the enactment of the bill was accordingly recommended by the department in its report, as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, February 8, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: There is transmitted herewith, in response to your request of January 3, for an opinion as to the merits of H. R. 6809, a memo

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