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GRANT PERPETUAL RIGHT OF WAY TO WINTHROP, MASS., OVER FORT BANKS MILITARY RESERVATION

FEBRUARY 11, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. WAINWRIGHT, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6591)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6591) authorizing the Secretary of War to grant to the town of Winthrop, Mass., a perpetual right of way over such land of the Fort Banks Military Reservation as is necessary for the purpose of widening Revere Street to a width of 50 feet, introduced by Mr. Underhill, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This is a measure to permit the widening of the street, in the town of Winthrop, Mass., that borders the Fort Banks Military Reservation. Your committee is advised that several accidents have happened because of the present street being as it is. There has been a practical agreement between the town authorities and the military authorities resulting in the introduction of this bill to accomplish the purpose desired.

The author of the bill, Hon. Charles L. Underhill, has submitted the following letter:

FEBRUARY 7, 1930. Hon. FRANK W. JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Referring to H. R. 6591. Thank you for your early consideration of this bill. The situation is acute, several fatal accidents having occurred at this point on the highway. The sooner the bill is passed, the better it will be for the safety of the people.

Referring to the letter of December 19 from the Secretary of War. I see no objection to the restrictions which he proposes to impose on the town of Winthrop. It is not intended, nor is it necessary that these details shall be a part of the bill, for it already provides that this project shall be “subject to such conditions,

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restrictions, and reservations as the Secretary of War may impose for the protection of the reservation.” Sincerely yours,

CHARLES L. UNDERHILL. The favorable comment of the War Department on this measure is as follows:

DECEMBER 19, 1929. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. JAMES: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (H. R. 6591) to authorize the Secretary of War to grant to the town of Winthrop, Mass., a perpetual right of way over such land of the Fort Banks Military Reservation as is necessary for the purpose of widening Revere Street to a width of 50 feet, transmitted with your letter of December 6, 1929, with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

There is no existing law on this subject.

No objection is interposed to the proposed legislation. However, if enacted into law, it is proposed to impose the following restrictions for the protection of the reservation:

"The width of 50 feet will be uniform, and will not be exceeded opposite any part of the reservation at the expense of the military reservation. No part of the reservation shall be used for the widening of the street until this street has been widened to at least 50 feet in both directions throughout the limits of the town. No trees on the reservation property will be destroyed." Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

INCREASE IN WHITE HOUSE POLICE FORCE

FEBRUARY 11, 1930.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. ELLIOTT, from the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9437]

The Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 9437) to authorize a necessary increase in the White House police force, having duly considered the same, hereby make report of it with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The following letter from Hon. Andrew W. Mellon, Secretary of the Treasury, to the Speaker of the House, explains the facts:

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

January 30, 1930. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SIR: The President believes that in the interest of good administration the control and direction of the White House police force should be vested in the chief of the Secret Service division of this department, as that division is charged with the protection of the President and his family and the person elected to be President. I therefore respectfully submit the draft of a bill to amend the act creating the White House police force approved September 14, 1922, so as to effect this change. Furthermore, it is the belief of this department that the

present force is inadequate to perform properly the duties assigned to them. The force now consists of 35 privates and 4 sergeants. It is believed that the force should consist of at least 43 privates. With a force of that size, the ranking officers should have a grade and salary equivalent to the importance of their assignments. The bill provides, therefore, for the appointment of 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, and 3 sergeants, in lieu of the 4 sergeants, and permits flexibility in the number of privates.

An estimate of the amount needed for 1931 was submitted to the Congress by the President in the Budget, but the amount has been reduced by the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, to the appropriation for the current year, pending the enactment of legislation reorganizing the force under the jurisdiction of the Secret Service.

It is recommended that the proposed legislation be given early and favorable consideration.

The Director of the Bureau of the Budget advises that, in so far as the financial program of the President is concerned, there is no objection to the submission of this proposed legislation to Congress for its consideration. Respectfully,

A. W. MELLON,

Secretary of the Treasury. Mr. Moran, chief of the Secret Service, made the following statement before the committee:

When the President directed that I should have supervision over the White House police force, I made a survey of the situation and found that the force was inadequate to properly protect the house and grounds, and therefore, requested 8 additional men. Four of these came from the park police and four from the Metropolitan police. We have been carrying these men on detail ever since. That order of the President was dated March 13, 1929. The personnel of the police force on duty at the White House, under order of the President, is the same as provided for in this bill.

O

BULL RUN AND SECOND MANASSAS BATTLE FIELDS, VA.

FEBRUARY 12, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mrs. Kahn, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 1408)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 1408) to provide for the study, investigation, and survey, for commemorative purposes, of the Bull Run and Second Manassas battle fields in the State of Virginia, introduced by Mr. Moore of Virginia, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This is a measure that will enable the War Department to classify, following a proper inspection and survey, the Bull Run and Second Manassas battle fields in the State of Virginia. The act of June 11, 1928, to provide for the study and investigation of battle fields in the United States for commemorative purposes resulted in the general classification of these battle fields by the War Department.

No funds have been available for a study of each battle field, however, and the classification adopted by the department has not been approved by act of Congress. The present bill is considered necessary to authorize the expenditure, which in this instance is estimated at $2,600, necessary to carry into effect the purpose of the law.

The letter from the War Department explains the matter and is therefore made a part of this report as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 18, 1929. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Acting Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. James: In compliance with your request of June 21, 1929, I am pleased to submit the following report on H. R. 1408, Seventy-first Congress, first session.

The subject of the proposed legislation is a bill to provide for the study, investigation, and survey, for commemorative purposes, of the Bull Run and Second Manassas battle fields in the State of Virginia,

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