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2d Session

No. 623

INTERNATIONAL MAP OF THE WORLD ON THE

MILLIONTH SCALE

FEBRUARY 6, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. PORTER, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. J. Res. 14)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred the resolution (H. J. Res. 14) to provide for the annual contribution of the United States toward the support of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World on the Millionth Scale, having considered the same, reports it to the House with the recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

A resolution identical with this passed the House in the last Congress but failed to receive action in the Senate prior to adjournment.

The facts in reference to this resolution are fully set forth in a message from the President of the United States dated January 4, 1929, which is appended hereto and made part of this report.

To the Congress of the United States:

With reference to my communication of December 30, 1924, regarding legislation to be enacted by the United States in connection with the map of the world on the millionth scale, I transmit herewith a report by the Secretary of State recommending a request to Congress providing for an annual appropriation of $50 for the payment of a contribution by the United States toward the support of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World on the Millionth Scale. The recent developments in the matter are explained in the report of the Secretary of State, which has the indorsement of the Secretary of the Interior, and I trust that this small annual appropriation will be granted.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 12, 1929.

The PRESIDENT:

The undersigned, the Secretary of State, has the honor to refer to his comunication, dated January 4, 1926, requesting the Congress of the United States to enact legislation providing for an appropriation of $30 as a contribution toward the support of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World. The Congress of the United States authorized an appropriation for this purpose in Public Resolution No. 22, Sixty-ninth Congress, approved May 1, 1926, and the second deficiency act of 1926 provided an appropriation, as follows:

For the share of the United States of the expenses of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World for the calendar year 1926, fiscal year 1927, $30."

In July of this year a conference on the international map of the world on the millionth scale was held in London, to which the Government of the United States designated as delegates Col. C. H. Birdseye, chief topographical engineer, United States Geological Survey, and Dr. Isaiah Bowman, director of the American Geographical Society and member of the advisory council of the Federal Board of Surveys and Maps.

At the conference held in Paris in 1913 provision was made for the establishment of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World on the Millionth Scale in the British Ordnance Office at Southampton, England, and the annual contribution of each adhering nation for the support of the bureau was fixed at 150 francs or 6 pounds sterling. This sum was considered at the conference held in London last July to be inadequate to meet the expenses of the bureau and consequently a resolution was passed reading: “That the governments of the countries adhering to the map of the world be asked to sanction the fixing of the subscription to the central bureau at 10 pounds sterling or its equivalent.

The American delegates to the recent conference in London have recommended that an annual appropriation be obtained from the Congress of the United States of 10 pounds sterling or its equivalent in order that this Government may support the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World on the Millionth Scale, and thus receive the full advantages which are to be obtained through the information service of this bureau. This information service is of considerable value to this Government in the compilation and publication of the map of the United States and its possessions which is being prepared in accordance with the specifications adopted for the international map of the world and which is of great value not only for military and naval reasons but also for purposes of commerce and aviation and for geographical and geological studies.

This Government has been informed, through the appropriate diplomatic channels, of the resolution adopted at the London conference of last July (quoted above) requesting the governments of the countries adhering to the international map of the world to fix their annual subscription to the central bureau at 10 pounds sterling or its equivalent. The matter has been referred to the Secretary of the Interior, whose reply contains the following paragraph:

"The Director of the Geological Survey has recommended that the United States Government sanction an increase in the amount of its annual subscription from 6 pounds to 10 pounds. It gives me pleasure to concur in this recommendation, and I respectfully suggest that you present the matter to Congress with the request that the appropriation for 1930 be fixed at $50 rather than at $30.”

I therefore recommend that Congress be asked to provide an annual appropriation of $50 for the payment of a contribution by the United States toward the support of the Central Bureau of the International Map of the World on the Millionth Scale. Respectfully submitted.

FRANK B. KELLOGG. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 11, 1929.

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INDEMINITY TO GOVERNMENT OF GREAT BRITAIN ON

ACCOUNT OF THE DEATH OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON

FEBRUARY 6, 1930.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. PORTER, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 1970)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred H. R. 1970, a bill to authorize the payment of an indemnity to the British Government on account of the death of Samuel Richardson, a British subject, alleged to have been killed at Consuelo, Dominican Republic, by United States marines, having given careful consideration to the bill, reports it to the House without amendment, with the recommendation that it do pass.

The passage of the bill has been recommended by the President in a message to Congress of December 13, 1929, in which he transmitted a letter from the Secretary of State setting forth in detail the facts in the case.

The President's message and the letter of the Secretary of State are as follows:

THE WHITE House, December 13, 1929. To the Congress of the United States:

I inclose a report received from the Secretary of State requesting the submission anew to the present Congress of the claim presented by the Government of Great Britain for the death, on November 1, 1921, at Consuelo, Dominican Republic, of Samuel Richardson, a British subject, as a result of a bullet wound inflicted presumably by a member of the United States Marine Corps, which formed the subject of a report made by the Secretary of State to the President on December 13, 1927, and the President's message to the Congress dated September 17. 1927, which are published as Senate Document No. 21, Seventieth Congress, first session. Copies of this are furnished for the full information of the Congress.

I concur in the recommendation made by the Secretary of State and recommend that, as an act of grace and without reference to the question of the legal liability of the United States in the matter, the Congress authorize an appropriation in the sum of $1,000 in order to effect a settlement of this claim. In bringing the matter anew to the attention of the present Congress I hope that the action recommended may receive favorable consideration.

HERBERT HOOVER. HR-71-2-VOL 2-17

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 12, 1929. The PRESIDENT:

On January 11, 1924, April 3, 1926, and December 13, 1927, the Secretary of State reported at length to the President concerning a claim presented by the Government of Great Britain for the death, on November 1, 1921, at Consuelo, Dominican Republic, of Samuel Richardson, a British subject, which resulted from a bullet wound inficted presumably by a member of the United States Marine Corps, and requested that the President recommend to Congress that, as an act of grace and without reference to the question of legal liability, it authorize an appropriation in the sum of $1,000 in payment of this claim. The correspondence in the matter is published in Senate Document No. 21, Seventieth Congress, a copy of which is attached for your information.

As it appears that final action in the matter was not taken by the Seventieth
Congress, I have the honor to suggest that it be submitted anew to the con-
sideration of the Seventy-first Congress.
Respectfully submitted.

H. L. STIMSON.
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TO MAKE THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER THE NATIONAL

ANTHEM

FEBRUARY 6, 1930.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. DYER, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 14)

The Committee on the Judiciary has had under consideration H. R. 14, to make The Star-Spangled Banner the national anthem, and reports it to the House with an amendment, with the recommendation that it do pass as amended.

The committee amendment is as follows:

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu thereof the following:

That the composition consisting of the words and music known as The StarSpangled Banner is designated the national anthem of the United States of America.

The measure is recommended by your committee for legalizing The Star-Spangled Banner as the national anthem of the United States, and as a method of further increasing the patriotism of the people of our country, and the continued popularity of the anthem.

The Star-Spangled Banner was written by Francis Scott Key at Fort McHenry, Md., at the time of the bombardment of that fort by the British warships under Admiral Cockburn. The battle began on the morning of September 13, 1814, at 6 o'clock, and continued all that day and until the morning of the next day. Francis Scott Key, under a flag of truce, visited the British fleet and was placed on board the Surprise, where he was courteously treated and finally transferred to his own vessel, the Minden, which was anchored in sight of the fort. He was held a prisoner in the British fleet until termination of the expedition. Under these circumstances he composed the StarSpangled Banner, descriptive of the scenes he beheld and of his doubts and fears during that day and the night following. He heard the bombardment, viewed the bombs bursting in air, and beheld the rockets' red glare. As the perilous night passed, which meant so much for

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