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DELEGATES TO FOURTH WORLD'S POULTRY CONGRESS

JANUARY 31, 1930.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Fish, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. J. Res. 210)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred House Joint Resolution 210, introduced by Mr. Fish, to send delegates to the Fourth World's Poultry Congress, to be held in England in 1930, having had the same under consideration, reports back to the House and recommends unanimously that the resolution do pass.

The United States is the most important poultry-raising country in the world, producing more than one-third of the world's supply of poultry, and eggs. The industry ranks fifth in value of all the major agricultural industries of this country, having a total annual farm sale value of approximately $1,181,000,000. Few people realize the vast size of the poultry industry of the United States, which includes the production and sale of eggs, chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese, etc. The farm sales value of the major agricultural products, ranks as follows: 1, dairy products; 2, corn; 3, swine; 4, cotton; 5, poultry; 6, hay and forage; 7, cattle; 8, wheat; 9, fruit.

The Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, R. W. Dunlap, stated, in a letter to the Secretary of State on December 17, 1928:

It is very desirable, therefore, in the judgment of this department, that this important industry (poultry) be suitably represented by accredited delegates and by a national exhibit at the coming congress, and it is recommended that the necessary authority for such representation be requested.

The advantage to be gained from such an international congress is to promote the commerce of the United States in the sale of poultry in foreign countries and to learn the methods used in other countries concerning the problems of production, distribution, and Marketing of poultry products.

An authorization of $15,000 is provided for in House Joint Resolution 210. to send official delegates to attend the Fourth World's Poultry Congress, which will be held in London in July, 1930. It is important that this authorization be passed immediately in order to secure appropriations in time to send official delegates to the Poultry Congress.

O

CONGRESS

ERADICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM

JANUARY 31, 1930.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. HAUGEN, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. J. Res. 232)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred House Joint Resolution 232 to amend the joint resolution entitled “Joint resolution to provide for eradication of pink bollworm and authorizing an appropriation therefor," approved May 21, 1928, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it

The bill reported herewith reads as follows:

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(H. J. Res. 232, Seventy-first Congress, second session) JOINT RESOLUTION To amend the joint resolution entitled "Joint resolution to provide for eradication

of pink bollworm and authorizing an appropriation therefor," approved May 21, 1928. Whereas an emergency demanding urgent consideration has arisen in that in the State of Arizona on lands within a Federal reclamation project as well as within an Indian reservation there has been discovered an intense infestation of the pink bollworm, a pest the host for which is cotton; and

Whereas the infestation discovered was imported into the State of Arizona from either another State or a foreign nation; and

Whereas the infestation in Arizona constitutes the first known appearance of the pink bollworm in an area which, by reason of the absence of hard frosts during the winter months, is most favorable to a rapid increase in its population; and

Whereas if immediate measures of eradication are not taken the pest not only will completely destroy the two special noncompetitive types of cotton not grown elsewhere, namely, the Acala and the Pima long staple, the growth of which has been encouraged by the Department of Agriculture through the medium of an expenditure of thousands of dollars, and the necessity of which for national defense purposes has been demonstrated fully during the recent Great War, but also will spread and constitute a threat of destruction to the cotton industry of the Nation; and

Whereas eradication of the pest can be effected particularly in the area in which it is found in the State of Arizona only by establishing and enforcing noncotton zones, areas in which the planting of cotton is prohibited, and by establishing marginal regulated zones, areas in which the planting of cotton by regulation is delayed; and

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Whereas there can not be enforced a noncotton zone except on condition that provision is made for compensation to farmers for the actual and necessary losses incident to the prohibition against the planting of cotton; and

Whereas collapse of the program of eradication and spread of the infestation to other States inevitably will follow the absence of speedy assurance to farmers in noncotton zones that for the year 1930 full compensation will be received by them; and

Whereas Public Resolution Numbered 47 of the Seventieth Congerss, approved May 21, 1928, granted such assurances to farmers in noncotton zones to be established in a State by way of authorizing an appropriation for full Federal compensation for the year 1928 and for participation by the Federal Government to the extent of paying one-half of the compensation after 1928; and

Whereas by reason of the nonexistence of State funds for the payment of one-half of the compensation within noncotton zones for the year 1930, by reason of the fact that the year 1930 is one in which no regular session of the Arizona State Legislature is to be held, and by reason of the nonexistence of State funds for the payment of the costs incidental to the convening of an extraordinary session of the State legislature, the State of Arizona, prior to the regular session of its legislature to be convened in January, 1931, is unable by action of its legislature to provide for participation for the year 1930 in the payment of compensation to farmers in noncotton zones; and

Whereas to protect a great national industry from a real and serious menace, as well as to protect a special industry essential to the Nation in time of war it is necessary, in order that speedy assurances be given to farmers in noncotton zones that full compensation for the year 1930 will be received by them, that there be an authorization for an appropriation for full compensation for the year 1930, on condition that there shall have been made guarantees satisfactory to the Secretary of Agriculture that one-half of such advances be repaid into the Treasury of the United States: Therefore be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That joint resolution entitled “Joint resolution to provide for eradication of pink bollworm and authorizing an appropriation therefor,” approved May 21, 1928 (Forty-fifth Statutes, page 688), is amended to read as follows:

“That when any State shall have enacted legislation and taken measures, including the establishment and enforcement of noncotton zones, adequate, in the opinion of the Secretary of Agriculture, to eradicate the pink bollworm in any area thereof actually infested, or threatened, by such pests, the said Secretary, under regulations to be prescribed by him, is authorized to pay, out of $2,500,000 hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be expended in cooperation with the proper authorities of the State concerned in compensating any farmer for his actual and necessary loss due to the enforced nonproduction of cotton within said zones: Provided, That no part of the funds herein authorized to be appropriated shall be available for compensation in connection with the establishment of a noncotton zone in any county unless and until the live pink bollworm is found within such county or within a radius of five miles thereof: Provided further, That such loss as to noncotton zones established by the State of Texas shall be determined as provided for in existing statutes of that State, and similarly by similar statutes which may later be provided by other States concerned, and that in estimating such loss due account shall be taken of the value of other crops which may be produced on said land, so that the loss shall not exceed the difference in return to the farmer from cotton over such other crops: Provided further. That such determination of actual and necessary loss shall be subject to the review and approval of the Secretary of Agriculture: And provided further, That no reimbursement shall be made with respect to any farmer who has not complied in good faith with all of the quarantine and control regulations prescribed by said Secretary of Agriculture and such State relative to the pink bollworm: And provided further, That when a State through action of its legislature or through action of individuals, associations, and/or corporations shall have made guarantees satisfactory to the Secretary of Agriculture that there shall be repaid into the Treasury of the United States one-half of the appropriation for compensation for the crop of 1930, then on the basis of a determination by the Secretary of Agriculture of the actual and necessary losses incident to the enforcement of noncotton zones the appropriation herein authorized shall be Available only for compensation for the crop of 1930 unless the State in which any noncotton zone is established shall thereafter appropriate and pay a sum in each year equal to the amount expended in such State by the United States under this authorization.

The "whereas" of H. J. Res. 232 give all the information with respect to the subject matter of that bill, except with respect to the following:

That were an extraordinary session of the State legislature to be held in Arizona an appropriation made by it would not be available, by reason of the constitutional procedure with regard to the levying and collection of taxes, until December, 1931, nor will an appropriation made at the regular session of the Arizona State Legislature to be held in January, 1931, by reason of the procedure of levying and collection of taxes be available until December, 1931, and then only one-half of such appropriation will be available. The remaining one-half will not be available until July, 1932.

H. J. Res. 232 is in accordance with the recommendations of the Secretary of Agriculture, in which he advocates the principle of equal participation by the State in the payment of compensation for actual and necessary losses resulting from enforced noncotton areas. The letter of the Secretary of Agriculture is printed in full.

JANUARY 31, 1930. Hon. GILBERT N. HAUGEN,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. HAUGEN: I have your letter of January 28 with inclosed joint resolution to amend the joint resolution entitled “Joint resolution to provide for eradication of pink bollworm and authorizing an appropriation therefor," approved May 21, 1928, introduced by Mr. Douglas of Arizona.

It is the belief of the department that every effort should be made to eradicate the pink bollworm from the State of Arizona and it is further believed that the authority provided for in the joint resolution is necessary to the success of the eradication effort. This department deems it essential to maintain the principle of equal participation by the State in the payment of compensation to farmers for actual and necessary losses sustained through the enforced nonproduction of cotton.

The department favors the passage of a joint resolution, retaining the principle of equal participation in payment of compensation, and in view of the urgency of the situation, hopes that there may be favorable action by your committee at the earliest possible moment.

The authorization of $5,000,000 is unnecessarily large. We suggest a reduction to $2,500,000. Sincerely,

ARTHUR M. HYDE, Secretary. The proposed law amends Public Resolution 47 of the Seventieth Congress in the following respects: (a) It reduces the appropriation authorized from $5,000,000 to $2,500,000.

(b) Whereas Public Resolution 47 of the Seventieth Congress provided for full Federal compensation for the actual and necessary losses for the crop of 1928, House Joint Resolution 232 provides that full compensation shall be paid for actual and necessary losses sustained to the crop of 1930 only on condition that guarantees satisfactory to the Secretary of Agriculture shall have first been made that one-half of Federal expenditures for the compensation of such actual and necessary losses shall be repaid into the Federal Treasury.

(c) Whereas Public Resolution 47 provided that the determination of actual and necessary losses not only for the year 1928 but for subsequent years was to be determined, subject to the approval of the Secretary of Agriculture, in accordance with the statutes of States in which noncotton zories existed, House Joint Resolution 232

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