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Nations of February 3, 1923, do involve
international obligations of the kind con-
templated by the Treaty between the United
States of America, the British Empire, France,
Italy, Japan and Poland, signed at Versailles
on June 28, 1919, and that these points come
within the competence of the League of

Nations as defined in that Treaty:
That the position adopted by the Polish Govern-

ment, and referred to in (a) and (b) of the
said Resolution was not in conformity with
its international obligations.

No. 7-Given by the Court on September 15, 1923 on

"The Question concerning the acquisition of

Polish nationality." That the position of the persons contemplated in the Resolution of the Council of the League of Nations of July 7, 1923, arising out of the application by Poland of Article 4 of the Treaty of June 28, 1919, between the Principal Allied and Associated Powers and Poland does fall within the competence of the League of Nations under the terms of the said Treaty. That Article 4 of the abovementioned Treaty does refer only to the habitual residence of the parents at the date of birth of the persons concerned.

No. 8–Given by the Court on December 6, 1923 on

The delimitation of the Polish-Czechoslovakian
Frontier (Jaworzina question)."

That the question of the delimitation of the frontier between Poland and Czechoslovakia has been settled by the decision of the Con

ference of Ambassadors of July 28, 1920

which is definitive, But that this decision must be applied in its

entirety, and that consequently that portion of the frontier in the region of Spisz topographically described therein remains subject (apart from the modifications of detail which the customary procedure of marking boundaries locally may entail) to the modifications provided for under paragraph 3 of Article II of the same decision.

JUDGMENT PRONOUNCED BY THE COURT IN THE CASE

OF THE S.S. WIMBLEDONI Pronounced by the Court on August 17, 1923 upon

the following case:

Between Great Britain, France, Italy and Japan, acting conjointly (and Poland by intervention under Article 63 of the Court Statute) on the one hand, and Germany on the other hand, concerning the refusal of the German authorities on March 21, 1921, to allow the S.S. Wimbledon to pass through the Kiel Canal with war material on her way to Poland.

The judgment which was drawn up by the majority of the Court, composed of nine judges, is to the effect that the suit was validly submitted, that the German authorities were wrong in refusing to allow the passage of the S.S. Wimbledon through the Kiel Canal and that the German Government is, in consequence, under an obligation to make good the prejudice sustained, which is estimated at approximately 140,000 French francs.

Judges Anzilotti and Huber were unable to agree with the majority of the Court and availed themselves of the right of delivering a separate opinion. M. Schücking, the German National Judge, took the same course.

1 Monthly Summary of the League of Nations. Vol. III, No. 8 September 15, 1923.

This is the first example in history of the arraignment before an international court of a sovereign state by one or more other sovereign states.

SOURCES FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

American Journal of International Law, 2 Jackson

Place, Washington, D. C.
Articles by Professor Manley O. Hudson. Vol. 17, January
1923, p. 15, The First Year of the Permanent Court of
International Justice; Vol. 18, January 1924, p. 1, The
Second Year of the Permanent Court of International
Justice.

American Bar Association Journal, 1612 First National

Bank Building, 38 South Dearborn St., Chicago, Ill. Professor Manley O. Hudson conducts a department which deals with recent opinions and decisions of international courts with particular attention to the opinions of the Permanent Court of International Justice.

World Peace Foundation, 40 Mt. Vernon St., Boston,

Mass. The official publications of the Permanent Court of International Justice.

Debater's Handbook Series, Volume 11, No. 2, pub

lished by The H. W. Wilson Company, 958 University Avenue, New York City

International Conciliation, Nos. 157 and 186

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS Nos. 1-189 (April, 1907. to August, 1923). Including papers by Baron d'Estournelles de Constant, George Trumbull Ladd, Elihu Root. James Brown Scott, Barrett]Wendell

, Charles E. Jefferson, Seth Low, John Bassett Moore, William James, Andrew Carnegie, Pope Pius X, Heinrich Lammasch, Norman Angell, Charles W. Eliot, Sir Oliver Lodge, Lord Haldane, Alfred H. Fried, James Bryce, and others; also a series of official documents dealing with the European War, the League of Nations, the Peace Conference, and with several of the political and economic problems resulting from the War. A list of titles and authors will be sent on application. 190. Franco-German Reconciliation: Text of an address delivered Juiy 6.

1923, at Paris, by Professor F. W. Foerster, formerly of the University of Munich, before the annual meeting of the Advisory Council in Europe of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Sep

tember, 1923. 191. Debate on Disarmament in the House of Commons, July 23. 1923. Re

printed from the London Times, July 24, 1923. October, 1923. 192. The Development of the International Mind: An Address delivered

before the Academy of International Law at The Hague, July 20, 1923.

by Nicholas Murray Butler. November, 1923. 193. Documents regarding the European Economic Situation, Series No.

III; Correspondence between Germany, the Allied Powers and the
United States, relating to Reparations; Speech of General Smuts

in London, October 23, 1923. December, 1923. 194. The Centenary of the Monroe Doctrine, by Charles Evans Hughes:

An address delivered before the American Academy of Political and
Social Science at Philadelphia, November 30, 1923; American Cooper.

ation for World Peace, by David Jayne Hill. January, 1924. 195. The Winning Plan selected by the Jury of the American Beace Award.

February, 1924. 196. Report upon Health, Sickness and Hunger among German Children,

by Haven Emerson, M.D., Professor of Public Health Administration,

Columbia University. March 1924. 197. The Permanent Court of International Justice, by John Bassett Moore.

The United States and the Permanent Court. Information regarding

the Court. April, 1924. Special Bulletin: Can the League of Nations Be saved? by Sir Charles

Walston. November, 1923. Copies of the above, so far as they can be spared, will be sent to libraries and educational institutions for permanent preservation postpaid upon receipt of a request addressed to the Secretary of the American Association for International Conciliation.

A charge of five cents will be made for copies sent to individuals. Regular subscription rate twenty-five cents for one year, or one dollar for five years.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
FOR INTERNATIONAL CONCILIATION

Executive Committee

NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER, CHAIRMAN GEORGE BLUMENTHAL

ALBA B. JOHNSON GANO DUNN

WILLIAM B. McKINLEY ROBERT A. FRANKS

Dwight W. MORROW JOSEPH P. GRACE

STEPHEN HENRY OLIN

Secretary
HENRY S. HASKELL

Director of Interamerican Division

PETER H. GOLDSMITH

Correspondents
SIR WILLIAM J. COLLINS, London, England
HELLMUT VON GERLACH, Berlin, Germany
EDOARDO GIRETTI, Bricherasio, Italy
CHRISTIAN L. LANGE, Geneva, Switzerland
T. MIYAOKA, Tokio, Japan
OTFRIED NIPPOLD, Saarlouis

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