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THE

YOUNG ENGLISHMAN'S

FIRST POETRY BOOK,

Compiled by

EDWARD C. LOWE, D.D.,

Head Master of S. Fohn's School, Hurstpierpoint.

Brighton:
G. WAKELING, NORTH STREET.

Oxford and London:
JAMES PARKER AND Co.

1868.

280.m. 256.

.

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PREFACE.

The following selection of English poems has been compiled with the view of presenting poetry to young learners in its more cheerful and attractive aspects. Most compilations that the Editor has met with are overlaid with didactic extracts, the weariness of which in class recitations teacher and pupil alike bemoan.

If through the Lyrics of our glorious English tongue some of our youngsters are encouraged in their love of animals, quickened to observe the beauties of nature and to read her parables, confirmed in domestic affection, trained to good humour and sympathy, and rooted in patriotic attachment to old England, The Young Englishman's First Poetry Book will have realized all that it compiler could desire to accomplish by so humble an:

istrament.

His acknowledgements are due to those authors and publishers who have relaxed in his favour their claims of copyright.

The Editor ventures to add a few hints that may

iv.

PREFACE.

possibly be useful on the method of teaching poetry to

little boys.

1. The teacher should always interest the young Englishman in the subject of the poem he is about to learn, by telling him its story, and seeing that he takes in the subject, as well as understands the words and expression.

2. Let so much only be set for a lesson, as can be recited quite perfectly; and let old pieces in longer portions be often gone over, and sometimes called for, without notice, after the day's repetition has been said; extra marks being offered for such impromptu recitations.

3. Special attention should be given to enunciation. Each boy should speak slowly; clearly, and in a tone audible to the whole form, the teacher correcting mistakes of emphasis, &c., while he may always allow an intelligent and spirited manner to count for marks or places.

4. The boy who is reciting must be made to stand firmly on his legs, never allowed to lounge; his hands at his side or before him, or almost anywhere, except in his pockets or behind his back.

THE COLLEGE, HURSTFIERPOINT.

Whitsuntide, 1868.

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