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[H. R. 2869]

An Act For the establishment of a United States Industrial Reformatory.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Attorney General, the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the Interior be, and are hereby, authorized and directed to select a site for an industrial reformatory which shall be used for the confinement of male persons between the ages of seventeen and thirty years, who have been or shall be convicted of offenses against the United States, including persons convicted by general courts-martial and consular courts, and sentenced for terms of imprisonment for more than one year, with or without hard labor, except those who have been convicted previously of an offense punishable by imprisonment for more than one year, and except also those convicted of treason, murder in the first or second degree, rape, or arson, and those sentenced to life imprisonment: Provided, That it shall be sufficient for the courts to sentence said class of offenders to imprisonment in the penitentiary without specifying the particular penitentiary or the United States Industrial Reformatory and the imprisonment shall be in such penitentiary or the United States Industrial Reformatory as the Attorney General shall from time to time designate.

SEC. 2. That upon the selection of an appropriate site the Attorney General shall submit to Congress estimate of the cost of purchasing the same, together with estimates of the expense necessary to construct the proper buildings thereon. For the purpose of construction of such buildings the Attorney General shall employ the labor of such United States prisoners confined in the United States penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia, the United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kansas, the United States penitentiary, McNeil Island, Washington, and State or Territorial prisons, penitentiaries, or reformatories, who are eligible for confinement in said United States Indutrial Reformatory under the provisions of this Act, and who can be used, under proper guard, in the work necessary to construct the buildings. The Attorney General at the same time, and annually thereafter, shall submit estimates in detail for all expenses of maintaining the said industrial reformatory, including salaries of all necessary officers and employees.

SEC. 3. That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized, upon the request of the Attorney General, to cause the plans, drawings, designs, specifications, and estimates for the remodeling and construction of the necessary buildings to be prepared in the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department, and the work of remodeling and constructing the said buildings to be supervised by the field force of said office: Provided, That the proper appropriations for the support and maintenance of the Office of

the Supervising Architect be reimbursed for the cost of preparing such plans, drawings, designs, specifications, and estimates for the aforesaid work, and the supervision of the remodeling and construction of said buildings.

SEC. 4. That the control and management of the United States Industrial Reformatory shall be vested in the Attorney General, who shall have power to appoint a superintendent, assistant superintendent, and all other officers necessary for the safe-keeping, care, protection, instruction, and discipline of the inmates.

SEO. 5. That the discipline to be observed in said United States Industrial Reformatory shall be correctional and designed to prevent young offenders from becoming habitual criminals. It shall be the duty of the Attorney General to provide for the instruction of the inmates in the common branches of an English education, and for their training in such trade, industry, or skilled vocation as will enable said inmates, upon release, to obtain self-supporting employment and to become self-reliant members of society. For this purpose the Attorney General shall establish and maintain a common school and trade schools in said industrial reformatory, and shall have authority to promulgate all such rules and regulations for the government of the officers of said industrial reformatory and the inmates thereof as he may deem proper and

necessary.

SEO. 6. That the inmates of the United States industrial reformatory shall be employed only in the production and manufacture of supplies for the United States Government, for consumption in United States institutions, and in duties necessary for the construction and maintenance of the institution.

SEO. 7. That the Attorney General is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to transfer to the United States industrial reformatory, as accommodations become available, all persons eligible under the terms of this Act for confinement in said industrial reformatory who are now, or shall hereafter be, confined in the United States Penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia; the United States Penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kansas; the United States Penitentiary, McNeil Island, Washington; and State and Territorial prisons, penitentiaries, or reformatories, and who are proper subjects for confinement in said United States industrial reformatory: Provided, That the Attorney General shall not transfer any prisoner who has less than nine months to serve of the term for which he was sentenced. The Attorney General is hereby authorized, in his discretion, at any time to transfer from the United States industrial reformatory to any of the aforesaid United States penitentiaries, or a suitable State or Territorial penitentiary or reformatory, any person who is ineligible for confinement therein under the terms of this Act, or any person who is apparently incorrigible, and whose presence in the said United States industrial reformatory is detrimental to the well-being of the institution. Such transfer shall, in the case of the United States penitentiaries and industrial reformatory, be made by the warden or superintendent of the institution from which the transfer is to be made, and in the case of State and Territorial penitentiaries, or reformatories, such transfer shall be made by the United States marshal of the judicial district in which the

institution from which the transfer is to be made is located. The actual and necessary expenses of such warden, superintendent, or marshal in making such transfer shall be paid, in the case of transfer from the United States penitentiaries and industrial reformatory, from the appropriation for the maintenance of the particular institution, and, in the case of transfer from State and Territorial penitentiaries, or reformatories, out of the judicial funds. SEC. 8. That two citizens of the United States of prominence and distinction, who shall be appointed by the President for terms of two and four years, respectively, from the date of the taking effect of this Act, the term of each to be designated by the President, but their successors shall be appointed for terms of four years, except that any person chosen to fill a vacancy shall be appointed only for the unexpired term of the citizen whom he shall succeed, and who shall serve without compensation, shall constitute, together with the Attorney General of the United States, the superintendent of prisons of the Department of Justice, and the superintendent of the United States industrial reformatory, who shall serve without additional compensation, a board of advisers of said reformatory. It shall be the duty of said board to devise ways and means looking to the reestablishment in society of the inmates discharged therefrom, whether by pardon, commutation, parole, or expiration of sentence, particularly with a view of securing suitable and remunerative employment for said discharged inmates: Provided, That the expenses of said board shall be paid out of the appropriation for the maintenance of the reformatory.

SEC. 9. That the inmates of the United States Industrial Reformatory shall be eligible for parole under sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Act of Congress approved June 25, 1910, being an Act to provide for the parole of United States prisoners and for other purposes, which provisions are hereby made to apply to all inmates of said reformatory. Such inmates shall be entitled to commutation allowance for good conduct in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Congress approved June 21, 1902, and entitled "An Act to regulate commutation for good conduct for United States prisoners," and the Acts amendatory thereof and supplemental thereto.

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SEC. 10. That every prisoner, when discharged from the United States Industrial Reformatory, shall be furnished with transportation to place of conviction, or place of bona fide residence, or to such other place within the United States as may be authorized by the Attorney General, and he shall also be furnished with suitable clothing and $10 in money.

SEC. 11. That all Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed.

[H. R. 8206]

An Act To amend the Judicial Code, and to further define the jurisdiction of the circuit courts of appeals and of the Supreme Court, and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That sections 128, 129, 237, 238, 239, and 240 of the Judicial Code as now existing be, and they are severally, amended and reenacted to read as follows: SEC. 128. (a) The circuit courts of appeal shall have appellate jurisdiction to review by appeal or writ of error final decisions

"First. In the district courts, in all cases save where a direct review of the decision may be had in the Supreme Court under section 238.

"Second. In the United States district courts for Hawaii and for Porto Rico in all cases.

"Third. In the district courts for Alaska or any division thereof, and for the Virgin Islands, in all cases, civil and criminal, wherein the Constitution or a statute or treaty of the United States or any authority exercised thereunder is involved; in all other civil cases wherein the value in controversy, exclusive of interest and costs, exceeds $1,000; in all other criminal cases where the offense charged is punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year or by death, and in all habeas corpus proceedings; and in the district court for the Canal Zone in the cases and mode prescribed in the Act approved September 21, 1922, amending prior laws relating to the Canal Zone.

"Fourth. In the Supreme Courts of the Territory of Hawaii and of Porto Rico, in all civil cases, civil or criminal, wherein the Constitution or a statute or treaty of the United States or any authority exercised thereunder is involved; in all other civil cases wherein the value in controversy, exclusive of interest and costs, exceeds $5,000, and in all habeas corpus proceedings.

"Fifth. In the United States Court for China, in all cases.

"(b) The circuit court of appeals shall also have appellate jurisdiction

"First. To review the interlocutory orders or decrees of the district courts which are specified in section 129.

"Second. To review decisions of the district courts sustaining or overruling exceptions to awards in arbitrations, as provided in section 8 of an Act entitled 'An Act providing for mediation, conciliation, and arbitration in controversies between certain employers and their employees,' approved July 15, 1913.

"(c) The circuit courts of appeal shall also have an appellate and supervisory jurisdiction under sections 24 and 25 of the Bankruptcy Act of July 1, 1898, over all proceedings, controversies, and cases had or brought in the district courts under that Act or any of its

amendments, and shall exercise the same in the manner prescribed in those sections; and the jurisdiction of the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in this regard shall cover the courts of bankruptcy in Alaska and Hawaii, and that of the Circuit Court of Appeals for the First Circuit shall cover the court of bankruptcy in Porto Rico.

"(d) The review under this section shall be in the following circuit courts of appeal: The decisions of a district court of the United States within a State in the circuit court of appeals for the circuit embracing such State; those of the District Court of Alaska or any division thereof, the United States district court, and the Supreme Court of Hawaii, and the United States Court for China, in the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit; those of the United States district court and the Supreme Court of Porto Rico in the Circuit Court of Appeals for the First Circuit; those of the District Court of the Virgin Islands in the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit; and those of the District Court of the Canal Zone in the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

"(e) The circuit courts of appeal are further empowered to enforce, set aside, or modify orders of the Federal Trade Commission, as provided in section 5 of 'An Act to create a Federal Trade Commission, to define its powers and duties, and for other purposes,' approved September 26, 1914; and orders of the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Federal Reserve Board, and the Federal Trade Commission, as provided in section 11 of 'An Act to supplement existing laws against unlawful restraints and monopolies, and for other purposes,' approved October 15, 1914.

"SEC. 129. Where, upon a hearing in a district court, or by a judge thereof in vacation, an injunction is granted, continued, modified, refused, or dissolved by an interlocutory order or decree, or an application to dissolve or modify an injunction is refused, or an interlocutory order or decree is made appointing a receiver, or refusing an order to wind up a pending receivership or to take the appropriate steps to accomplish the purposes thereof, such as directing a sale or other disposal of property held thereunder, an appeal may be taken from such interlocutory order or decree to the circuit court of appeals; and sections 239 and 240 shall apply to such cases in the circuit courts of appeals as to other cases therein: Provided, That the appeal to the circuit court of appeals must be applied for within thirty days from the entry of such order or decree, and shall take precedence in the appellate court; and the proceedings in other respects in the district court shall not be stayed during the pendency of such appeal unless otherwise ordered by the court, or the appellate court, or a judge thereof: Provided, however, That the district court may, in its discretion, require an additional bond as a condition of the appeal."

SEC. 237. (a) A final judgment or decree in any suit in the highest court of a State in which a decision in the suit could be had, where is drawn in question the validity of a treaty or statute of the United States, and the decision is against its validity; or where is drawn, in question the validity of a statute of any State, on the ground of its being repugnant to the Constitution, treaties, or laws of the

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