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(H. R. 11946)

An Act To increase the clothing and cash gratuity furnished to persons discharged from prisons.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That on the discharge from any prison of any person convicted under the laws of the United States on indictment he shall be furnished with transportation to the place of conviction or place of bona fide residence within the United States at the time of his commitment under sentence of the court, or to such place within the United States as may be authorized by the Attorney General; and if the term of his imprisonment shail have been six months or more he shall also be furnished with such suitable clothing as may be authorized by the Attorney General, and, in the discretion of the Attorney General, an amount of money not to exceed $20. For the furnishing of such clothing and money charge shall be made and allowed in the accounts of the said prison with the United States.

Approved, July 3, 1926.

(PUBLIC—No. 669—70TH CONGRESS)

(H. R. 7729)

An Act To divest goods, wares, and merchandise manufaa tured, produced, or mined by convicts or prisoners of their interstate character in certain cases.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That all goods, wares, and merchandise manufactured, produced, or mined, wholly or in part, by convicts or prisoners, except convicts or prisoners on parole or probation, or in any penal and/or reformatory institutions, except commodities manufactured in Federal penal and correctional institutions for use by the Federal Government, transported into any State or Territory of the United States and remaining therein for use, consumption, sale, or storage, shall upon arrival and delivery in such State or Territory be subject to the operation and effect of the laws of such State or Territory to the same extent and in the same manner as though such goods, wares, and merchandise had been manufactured, produced, or mined in such State or Territory, and shall not be exempt therefrom by reason of being introduced in the original package or otherwise.

SEC. 2. This Act shall take effect five years after the date of its approval. Approved, January 19, 1929.

(H. R. 4502)

An Act Declaring pistols, revolvers, and other firearms capable of being concealed on the person nonmailable and providing penalty.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That pistols, revolvers, and other firearms capable of being concealed on the person are hereby declared to be nonmailable and shall not be deposited in or carried by the mails or delivered by any postmaster, letter carrier, or other person in the Postal Service: Provided, That such articles may be conveyed in the mails, under such regulations as the Postmaster General shall prescribe, for use in connection with their official duty, to officers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or officers Reserve Corps; to officers of the National Guard or Militia of the several States, Territories, and Districts; to officers of the United States or of the several States, Territories, and Districts whose official duty is to serve process of warrants of arrest or mittimus of commitment; to employees of the Postal Service; and to watchmen engaged in guarding the property of the United States, the several States, Territories, and Districts: And provided further, That such articles may be conveyed in the mails to manufacturers

of firearms or bona fide dealers therein in customary trade shipments, .- including such articles for repairs or replacement of parts, from

one to the other, under such regulations as the Postmaster General shall prescribe. Whoever shall knowingly deposit or cause to be deposited for mailing or delivery, or shall knowingly cause to be delivered by mail according to the direction thereon, or at any place to which it is directed to be delivered by the person to whom it is addressed, any pistol, revolver, or fir'ırm, declared by this Act to be nonmailable, shall be fined not exceeding $1,000 or imprisoned not more than two years, or both.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted that this Act shall take effect ninety days after its approval by the President of the United States. Approved, February 8, 1927.

(H. R. 11285) An Act To establish Federal prison camps. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Attorney General is hereby authorized to establish, equip, maintain, and operate prison camps upon sites selected by the Attorney General, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the Secretary of the Interior. Upon written order of the Attorney General persons convicted under the laws of the United States may be transferred to such prison camps for employment upon road or trail building, the cost of which is borne exclusively by the United States: Provided, That this Act shall not authorize any such camp for employment upon any Indian reservation.

Sec. 2. That the Act of Congress approved June 21, 1902, as amended by the Act of April 27, 1906, providing for commutation for good conduct for United States prisoners, shall be applicable to prisoners transferred to the camps herein authorized; and in addition thereto each prisoner, without regard to length of sentence, shall be allowed, under the same terms and conditions as provided in the Acts of Congress above referred to, a deduction from his sentence of five days for each month of actual employment in said camp.

Sec. 3. That all laws of the United States relating to the imprisonment, transfer, control, discipline, escape, release of, or in any way affecting prisoners, except as modified by this Act, shall be applicable to prisoners transferred to the camps herein authorized.

Sec. 4. That as part of the expense of operating such prison camps the Attorney General is hereby authorized and empowered to provide for the payment to the inmates or dependents upon inmates of prison camps herein authorized such pecuniary earnings as he may deem proper, under such rules and regulations as he may prescribe.

Sec. 5. That the expense incident to the establishment, equipment, maintenance, and operation of prison camps shall be payable from the appropriation for support of United States prisoners, and such appropriation shall be reimbursed to the extent agreed upon by the Attorney General and the head of the department to which the appropriation for road building or such other public improvement incident to which the prison camp was established was made Approved, February 26, 1929.

(II. R. 973)

An Act To remove the age limit of persons who may be conined at the United States industrial reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 831, title 18, United States Code, being section 1 of the Act of Congress approved January 7, 1925, entitled “ An Act for the establishment of a United States industrial reformatory,” is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

“The Attorney General, the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the Interior are authorized and directed to select a site for an industrial reformatory which shall be used for the confinement of male persons who have been or shall be convicted of offenses against the United States, including persons convicted by general courtsmartial and consular courts, and sentenced for terms of imprisonment for more than one year, with or without hard labor, except those who have been convicted previously of an offense punishable by imprisonment for more than one year, and except also those convicted of treason, murder in the first or second degree, rape, or arson, and those sentenced to life imprisonment. It shall be suffi. cient for the courts to sentence said class of offenders to imprisonment in the penitentiary without specifying the particular penitentiary or the United States industrial reformatory, and the imprisonment shall be in such penitentiary or the United States industrial reformatory as the Attorney General shall from time to time designate.” Approved, May 12, 1930.

(H. R. 7410) An Act To establish a hospital for defective delinquents. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Attorney General is authorized and directed to select a site, either in connection with some existing institution or elsewhere, for a hospital for the care and treatment of all persons charged with or convicted of offenses against the United States, and who are in the actual custody of its officers or agents, and who at the time of their conviction or during the time of their detention and/or confinement are or shall become insane, afflicted with an incurable or chronic degenerative disease, or so defective mentally or physically so to require special medical care and treatment not available in an existing Federal institution.

Sec. 2. Upon the selection of an appropriate site the Attorney General shall submit to Congress an estimate of the cost of purchasing the same and of remodeling, constructing, and equipping the necessary buildings thereon. The Attorney General, at the same time and annually thereafter, shall submit estimates covering the expense of maintaining and operating such institution, including salaries of all necessary officers and employees.

Sec. 3. That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized, upon request of the Attorney General, to cause plans, specifications, and estimates for the remodeling and constructing of the necessary buildings to be prepared in the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Department of the Treasury, and the work of remodeling and constructing the said buildings to be supervised by the field force of said office: Provided, That if, in his discretion, it would be impracticable to cause such plans, specifications, and estimates to be prepared in the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Department of the Treasury, and such work to be supervised by the field force of said office, the Secretary of the Treasury may contract for all or any portion of such work to be performed by such suitable person or firm as he may select: Provided further, That the proper appropriation for the support and maintenance of the Office of the Supervising Architect be reimbursed for the cost of such work and supervision.

SEC. 4. That the control and management of the institution established hereunder shall be vested in the Attorney General, who shall have power to promulgate rules for the government thereof, and to appoint, subject to the civil service laws and regulations of the United States, all necessary officers and employees. In connection with such maintenance and operation the Attorney General is authorized to establish and conduct industries, farms, and other activities; to classify the inmates; and to provide for their proper treatment, care, rehabilitation, and reformation.

Sec. 5. That the inmates of said institution shall be employed in such manner and under such condition as the Attorney General may direct. The Attorney General may, in his discretion, establish indus

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