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United States prisoners" or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

SEC. 6. Whenever a juvenile is arrested on a charge of having committed an offense against the laws of the United States, the arresting officer shall immediately notify the Attorney General of such fact. If such juvenile is not forth with taken before a committing, magistrate, he may be detained in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for such purposes, but shall not be detained in a jail or similar place of detention, unless, in the opinion of the arresting officer, such detention is necessary to secure the custody of such juvenile, or to insure his safety or that of others. In no case shall such detention be for a longer period than is necessary to produce such juvenile before a committing magistrate. The committing magistrate may release such juvenile on bail, upon his own recognizance or that of some responsible person, or in default of bail may commit him to the custody of the United States marshal, who shall lodge him in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for that purpose. Such juvenile shall not be committed to a jail or other similar institution, unless in the opinion of the marshal it appears that such commitment is necessary to secure the custody of the juvenile or to insure his safety or that of others. A juvenile detained in a jail or similar institution shall be held in custody in a room or other place apart from adults if facilities for such segregation are available.

Sec. 6. The Director of the Bureau of Prisons may contract with public or private agencies for the custody, care, subsistence, education, and training of juvenile delinquents and may defray the cost of such custody, care, subsistence, education, and training from the appropriation for “Support of United States prisoners" or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

SEC. 7. A juvenile delinquent committed under this Act who has, by his conduct, given sufficient evidence that he has reformed, may be released on parole at any time by the Board of Parole established by the Act of May 13, 1930 (46 Stat. 272, ch. 255; U. S. C., title 18, sec. 723, subsecs. (a)-(c)). If it shall appear to the satisfaction of such Board that there is reasonable probability that such juvenile will, if conditionally released, remain at liberty without violating the law, then the Board may, in its discretion, parole such juvenile under conditions and regulations as the Board may deem proper.

SEC. 8. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to supersede or repeal any provisions of law relative to the custody, care, subsistence, education, or training of juveniles, which are now or may hereafter be made particularly applicable to the District of Columbia.

Sec. 9. This Act may be cited as “The Federal Juvenile Delinquency Act".

(CHAPTER 806—30 SESSION)

(H. R. 6178]

AN ACT To abolish appeals in habeas corpus proceedings brought to test the validity of

orders of removal. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That subsections La) and (b) of section 6 of the Act of February 13, 1925, entitled "An Act to amend the Judicial Code, and to further define the jurisdiction of the circuit courts of appeals and of the Supreme Court, and for other purposes” (43 Stat. 940; U. S. C., title 28, sec. 452 and sec. 463, subsecs. (a) and (b)), be, and they are hereby, amended to read as follows:

"(a) In a proceeding in habeas corpus in a district court, or before a district judge or a circuit judge, the final order shall be subject to review, on appeal, by the circuit court of appeals of the circuit wherein the proceeding is had : Provided, however, That there shall be no right of appeal from such order in any habeas corpus proceeding to test the validity of a warrant of removal issued pursuant to the provisions of section 1014 of the Revised Statutes (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 591) or the detention pending removal proceedings. A circuit judge shall have the same power to grant writs of habeas corpus within his circuit that a district judge has within his district. The order of the circuit judge shall be entered in the records of the district court of the district wherein the restraint complained of is had.

“(b) In such a proceeding in the District Court of the United States for the District of Columbia, or before a justice thereof, the final order shall be subject to review on appeal, by the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia : Provided, however, That there shall be no right of appeal from such order in any habeas corpus proceeding to test the validity of a warrant of removal issued pursuant to the provisions of section 1014 of the Revised Statutes (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 591) or the detention pending removal proceedings." Approved, June 29, 1938.

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United States prisoners" or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

SEC. 6. Whenever a juvenile is arrested on a charge of having committed an offense against the laws of the United States, the arresting officer shall immediately notify the Attorney General of such fact. If such juvenile is not forth with taken before a committing, magistrate, he may be detained in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for such purposes, but shall not be detained in a jail or similar place of detention, unless, in the opinion of the arresting officer, such detention is necessary to secure the custody of such juvenile, or to insure his safety or that of others. In no case shall such detention be for a longer period than is necessary to produce such juvenile before a committing magis trate. The committing magistrate may release such juvenile on bail, upon his own recognizance or that of some responsible person, or in default of bail may commit him to the custody of the United States marshal, who shall lodge him in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for that purpose. Such juvenile shall not be committed to a jail or other similar institution, unless in the opinion of the marshal it appears that such commitment is necessary to secure the custody of the juvenile or to insure his safety or that of others. A juvenile detained in a jail or similar institution shall be held in custody in a room or other place apart from adults if facilities for such segregation are available.

Sec. 6. The Director of the Bureau of Prisons may contract with public or private agencies for the custody, care, subsistence, education, and training of juvenile delinquents and may defray the cost of such custody, care, subsistence, education, and training from the appropriation for Support of United States prisoners" or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

SEC. 7. A juvenile delinquent committed under this Act who has, by his conduct, given sufficient evidence that he has reformed, may be released on parole at any time by the Board of Parole established by the Act of May 13, 1930 (46 Stat. 272, ch. 255; U. S. C., title 18, sec, 723, subsecs. (a)-(c)). If it shall appear to the satisfaction of such Board that there is reasonable probability that such juvenile will, if conditionally released, remain at liberty without violating the law, then the Board may, in its discretion, parole such juvenile under conditions and regulations as the Board may deem proper.

Sec. 8. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to supersede or repeal any provisions of law relative to the custody, care, subsistence, education, or training of juveniles, which are now or may hereafter be made particularly applicable to the District of Columbia.

Sec. 9. This Act may be cited as “The Federal Juvenile Delinquency Act.

(CHAPTER 806—30 SESSION)

(H. R. 6178]

AN ACT To abolish appeals in habeas corpus proceedings brought to test the validity of

orders of removal. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That subsections (a) and (b) of section 6 of the Act of February 13, 1925, entitled "An Act to amend the Judicial Code, and to further define the jurisdiction of the circuit courts of appeals and of the Supreme Court, and for other purposes” (43 Stat. 940; U. S. C., title 28, sec. 452 and sec. 463, subsecs. (a) and (b)), be, and they are hereby, amended to read as follows:

“(a) In a proceeding in habeas corpus in a district court, or before a district judge or a circuit judge, the final order shall be subject to review, on appeal, by the circuit court of appeals of the circuit wherein the proceeding is had: Provided, however, That there shall be no right of appeal from such order in any habeas corpus proceeding to test the validity of a warrant of removal issued pursuant to the provisions of section 1014 of the Revised Statutes (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 591) or the detention pending removal proceedings. A circuit judge shall have the same power to grant writs of habeas corpus within his circuit that a district judge has within his district. The order of the circuit judge shall be entered in the records of the district court of the district wherein the restraint complained of is had.

“(b) In such a proceeding in the District Court of the United States for the District of Columbia, or before a justice thereof, the final order shall be subject to review on appeal, by the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia : Provided, however, That there shall be no right of appeal from such order in any habeas corpus proceeding to test the validity of a warrant of removal issued pursuant to the provisions of section 1014 of the Revised Statutes (U. S. C., title`18, sec. 591) or the detention pending removal proceedings." Approved, June 29, 1938.

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United States prisoners” or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

Sec. 6. Whenever a juvenile is arrested on a charge of having committed an offense against the laws of the United States, the arresting officer shall immediately notify the Attorney General of such fact. If such juvenile is not forth with taken before a committing magistrate, he may be detained in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for such purposes, but shall not be detained in a jail or similar place of detention, unless, in the opinion of the arresting officer, such detention is necessary to secure the custody of such juvenile, or to insure his safety or that of others. In no case shall such detention be for a longer period than is necessary to produce such juvenile before a committing magis trate. The committing magistrate may release such juvenile on bail, upon his own recognizance or that of some responsible person, or in default of bail may commit him to the custody of the United States marshal, who shall lodge him in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for that purpose. Such juvenile shall not be committed to a jail or other similar institution, unless in the opinion of the marshal it appears that such commitment is necessary to secure the custody of the juvenile or to insure his safety or that of others. A juvenile detained in a jail or similar institution shall be held in custody in a room or other place apart from adults if facilities for such segregation are available,

Sec. 6. The Director of the Bureau of Prisons may contract with public or private agencies for the custody, care, subsistence, education, and training of juvenile delinquents and may defray the cost of such custody, care, subsistence, education, and training from the appropriation for Support of United States prisoners” or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate.

SEC. 7. A juvenile delinquent committed under this Act who has, by his conduct, given sufficient evidence that he has reformed, may be released on parole at any time by the Board of Parole established by the Act of May 13, 1930 (46 Stat. 272, ch. 255; U. S. C., title 18, sec. 723, subsecs. (a)-(c)). If it shall appear to the satisfaction of such Board that there is reasonable probability that such juvenile will, if conditionally released, remain at liberty without violating the law, then the Board may, in its discretion, parole such juvenile under conditions and regulations as the Board may deem proper.

Sec. 8. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to supersede or repeal any provisions of law relative to the custody, care, subsistence, education, or training of juveniles, which are now or may hereafter be made particularly applicable to the District of Columbia.

Sec. 9. This Act may be cited as "The Federal Juvenile Delinquency Act".

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