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My Uncle and his House : A Story of Danish Life. By M. GOLDSCHMIDT

461
Nelson's Sword. By AGNES STRICKLAND.

134
Oysters : A Gossip about their Natural and Economic History

401
Poland and the Treaty of Vienna. By J. T. ABDY, LL.D., Regius Professor of
Laws, Cambridge.

493
Political Economy and the Gospel. By the Rev. J. LLEWELYN DAVIES

219

Prussian Contest, The, and the French Emperor's Roman Policy

75

Russian Political Press, The

393
Sea, The Chemistry of the. By Dr. T. L. PHIPSON

372
Sermons and Preaching. By the Rev. Canon ROBINSON.

409
Servia in 1863. By PHILIP CHRISTITCH, Servian Senator

498

“ Sing, Sing, Bird of Spring"

41

Stanley's Lectures on the Jewish Church. By MATTHEW ARNOLD

327
Trinity College, Cambridge, Lines written in one of the Walks of. By the late W.
SIDNEY WALKER.

460

Vincenzo; or Sunken Rocks. By JOHN RUFFINI. Author of "LORENZO BENONI,"

“DOCTOR ANTONIO,” &c. :-

Chapters xv. and xvi.

42

Chapters XVII—XIX.

106

Chapters XX-XXII.

186

Chapters XXIII.—XXV.

288

Chapters XXVI.--XXVIII.

356

Chapters XXIX.-XXXI. .

417

Waits, The First. By the Author of "John Halifax"

218

Water-Babies, The: A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby. By the Rev. Professor KINGSLEY,

F.L.S. :-

Chapter iv.

1

Chapter v.

95

Chapter vi.

209

Chapter VII.

316

Chapter VIII, and Last.

383

Wealth of Nations, The, and the Slave Power. By a Professor of Political Economy 269
Welcome, A. By RICHARD GARNETT

349
Whist, The Game of. By W. P.

201
Wigtown Martyrs, The: A Story of the Covenant ip 1685. By Principal TULLOCH . 145

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Contributors to this Volume.

ABDY, PROFESSOR J. T.
ALFORD, DEAN.
ARNOLD, MATTHEW.
AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.
BOWRING, SIR JOHN.
CHESTER, JOSEPH LEMUEL.
CHRISTITCH, PHILIP.
CLARK, REV. W. G.
DAVIES, REV. J. LLEWELYN.
DOBELL, SYDNEY.
GARNETT, RICHARD.
GOLDSCHMIDT, M.
HAMILTON, JAMES, D.D.
HARE, THOMAS.
HOOD, THOMAS.
JAMES, SIR JOHN KINGSTON.
KINGSLEY, PROFESSOR CHARLES.
KINGSLEY, HENRY.
LESLIE, T. E. CLIFFE.
MACLAREN, ARCHIBALD.
MASSON, PROFESSOR DAVID.
MERIVALE, HERMAN.
MÜLLER, PROFESSOR MAX.
PHIPSON, DR. T. L.
POLE, PROFESSOR WILLIAM.
ROBINSON, REV. CANON.
ROSSETTI, CHRISTINA G.
RUFFINI, JOHN.
STEPHEN, LESLIE.
STRICKLAND, AGNES.
THORNTON, WILLIAM T.
TULLOCH, PRINCIPAL.
WALKER, W. SIDNEY (THE LATE).
WRIGHT, THOMAS.

MACMILLAN'S MAGAZINE.

VOLUMES I. TO VII., COMPRISING NUMBE RS 1–42.

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MACMILLAN'S MAGAZINE.

NOVEMBER, 1862.

THE WATER-BABIES :

A FAIRY TALE FOR A LAND-BABY.

BY THE REV. PROFESSOR KINGSLEY, F.L.S. ETC.

a

CHAPTER IV.

river side, and threw down into the

water a long tap-root of flame. Tom, So the salmon went up, after Tom had curious little rogue that he was, must warned them of the wicked old otter; needs go and see what it was ; so he and Tom went down, but slowly and swam to the shore, and met the light as cautiously, coasting along the shore; it stopped over a shallow run at the ,

a and he was many days about it, for it edge of a low rock. was many miles down to the sea.

And there, underneath the light, lay And, as he went, he had a very strange

five or six great salmon, looking up at adventure. It was a clear still September the flame with their great goggle eyes, night, and the moon shone so brightly and wagging their tails, as if they were down through the water, that he could very much pleased at it. not sleep, though he shut his eyes as Tom came to the top, to look at this tight as he could. So, at last, he came wonderful light nearer, and made a up to the top, and sat upon a little point splash. of rock, and looked up at the broad And he heard a voice say :yellow moon, and wondered what she was, “ There was a fish rose.” and thought that she looked at him. He did not know what the words And he watched the moonlight on the meant : but he seemed to know the rippling river, and the black heads of the sound of them, and to know the voice firs, and the silver-frosted lawns, and which spoke them; and he saw on the listened to the owl's hoot, and the snipe's bank three great two-legged creatures, bleat, and the fox's bark, and the otter's one of whom held the light, flaring and laugh ; and smelt the soft perfume of sputtering, and another a long pole. the birches, and the wafts of heather And he knew that they were men, and honey off the grouse-moor far above; was frightened, and crept into a hole in and felt very happy, though he could the rock, from which he could see what not well tell why. You, of course, would went on. have been very cold sitting there on a The man with the torch bent down September night, without the least bit over the water, and looked earnestly in; of clothes on your wet back; but Tomi and then he said : was a water-baby, and therefore felt cold “ Tak that muckle fellow, lad; he's no more than a fish.

ower fifteen punds; and haud your hand Suddenly, he saw a beautiful sight. steady. A bright red light moved along the Tom felt that there was some danger

No. 37.- VOL. VII.

B

a

still ;

coming, and longed to warn the foolish and he swam round and round him, salmon, who kept staring up at the closer and closer; and, as he did not light as if he was bewitched. But, before stir, at last he came quite close and he could make up his mind, down came looked him in the face. the pole through the water; there was The moon shone so bright that Tom a fearful splash and struggle, and Tom could see every feature ; and, as he saw, saw that the poor salmon was speared he recollected, bit by bit. It was his right through, and was lifted out of the old master, Grimes. water.

Tom turned tail, and swam away as And then, from behind, there sprung fast as he could. on these three men three other men; “Oh dear me !" he thought, "now he and there were shouts, and blows, and will turn into a water-baby. What a words which Tom recollected to have nasty troublesome one he will be! And heard before ; and he shuddered and perhaps he will find me out, and beat turned sick at them now, for he felt me again.” somehow that they were strange, and So he went up the river again a little ugly, and wrong, and horrible. And it way, and lay there the rest of the night all began to come back to him. They under an alder root; but, when morning were men; and they were fighting; came, he longed to go down again to the savage, desperate, up-and-down fighting, big pool, and see whether Mr. Grimes such as Tom had seen too many times had turned into a water-baby yet. before.

So he went very carefully, peeping And he stopped his little ears, and round all the rocks, and hiding under longed to swim away; and was very glad

all the roots. Mr. Grimes lay there that he was a water-baby, and had he had not turned into a waternothing to do any more with horrid baby. In the afternoon Tom went back dirty men, with foul clothes on their again. He could not rest till he had backs, and foul words on their lips: but found out what had become of Mr. Grimes, he dared not stir out of his hole; while But this time Mr. Grimes was gone; and the rock shook over his head with the Tom made up his mind that he was trampling and struggling of the keepers turned into a water-baby. and the poachers.

He might have made himself easy, poor All of a sudden there was

a tre

little man; Mr. Grimes did not turn mendous splash, and a frightful flash, into a water-baby, or anything like one at and a hissing, and all was still.

all. But he did not make himself easy ; For into the water, close to Tom, fell and a long time he was fearful lest he one of the men; he who held the light should meet Grimes suddenly in some in his hand. Into the swift river he deep pool. He could not know that sank, and rolled over and over in the the fairies had carried him away, and current. Tom heard the men above put him, where they put everything run along, seemingly looking for him : which falls into the water, exactly where but he drifted down into the deep hole it ought to be. But, do you know, below, and there lay quite still, and they what had happened to Mr. Grimes had could not find him.

such an effect on him, that he never Tom waited a long time, till all was poached salmon any more.

And it is quiet; and then he peeped out, and saw quite certain that, when a man becomes the man lying. At last he screwed à confirmed poacher, the only way to up his

courage, and swam down to him. cure him is to put him under water for "Perhaps," he thought, “the water has twenty-four hours, like Grimes. So, made him fall asleep, as it did me.” when you grow to be a big man, do you

Then he went nearer. He grew more behave as all honest fellows should ; and and more curious, he could not tell never touch a fish or a head of game why. He must go and look at him. which belongs to another man without He would go very quietly, of course; his express leave; and then people will

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