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DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING THE PLATES.

89 249

Madame de Stael,
Steam Engines, (No. 1 and 2,) invented by Col. Ogden,
Frontispiece-View of Fort Mc Henry,
View of Militia Camp,
Portrait of Dr. Wistar,

353 441

DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, to wit:
BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the 1st day of July, in the forty-first year

of the independence of the United States of America, A. D. 1817, Moses THOMAS, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

The Analectic Magazine. In conformity to the Act of Congress of the United States entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned.” And also to the act, entitled, “An act supplementary to an act entitled “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.

DAVID CALDWELL,
Clerk of the District of Pennsylvania.

dithains
12-17.30

INDEX TO VOLUME XII.

347

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American Poetry, review of 66 Dry-Rot, on the means of curing
Anecdotes of Tasso, 74-Assieri,

the

486
ib-Count Pepoli, ib-Lord Ren-
dlesham, 75-Dr. Franklin, 79

England, improvements in

80
Modern Hermit, 80-Men of Bu.

new works published lately
siness, ib.--Original of Franklin,

in

84
162---French Theatre, 167–.

views of, by gen. Pillet, re-
Franklin,

340
view of

177
Agriculture,

76

the truth respecting, review

of
Allston's Painting, the angel Uriel,

177
165, 174 Eichhorn's Antient History, notice

of
Ashantee in Africa, account of the

263
kingdom of

255 English Opera House,
Austria, population of

264
electioneering,

348
Amusing perplexities,
348 Education,

ib
Academy of Sciences,

349 Epitaph on the Spanish constitution 419
Azaras, Don F. de, Travels in South English and Chinese Dictionary, 437
America, review of

377
Accom on Chemical Tests, notice Forsyth's remarks on Italy, review
of

436
of

1

France, morals and jurisprudence
Boston Bard, the miscellaneous po-

in

135
ems of the, review of

73 Fires in buildings, on extinguish-
Beppo, a Venetian story, review of 156 ing of

161
Boa Constrictor, immense, 174 France, jeux d'esprit on the state of 166
Burckhardt, the celebrated traveller

Fine Arts, on the progress of, in
in Africa, account of

251
France

222
Brazils; travels of the prince Maxi-

in England,

264
milian to the

263
Buonaparte, life of, in Arabic, 348 Germany, extract of a letter from a
Bible Society in Russia,
349 young American in

82
Boundaries of the United States, ac-

Godwin's tetter of advice to a young
count of the measures adopted for American,

128
settling the

423 Genlis on the influence of women

on manners and literature, review
Cherokee Indiaps, reflections on the

of

311
institutions of the
36 Greenlanders, account of the

355
Chimnies, machine to sweep

76 Germany, large bones found in 437
Calomel, manufacture of
Cattle, on the use of salt in feeding ib High Treason,

79
Carey's Letter to the Academy of

Hazlett, lectures on the Poets,
Arts of Philadelphia,

163

views of the English stage, &c.
Constantinople, from Neal'stravels, 168

&c. review of

201
Curran, recollections of, &c. review

Hall's Travels in Canada and the
of

241 United States, review of 363
Canada, Bouchette's description of
Lower, review of

294 Iron Rail Ways, improvement and
Calcutta, description of

341
extension of

436
Canton,

342 Kaleidoscope, Dr. Brewster's spe-
Coal Gas, improvement in the puri- cifications of the

257
fication of

346
new products from 349 Lamp without flame,

81
Comets, remarks on the tails of 431 Literature and science, progress of,
Caraccas, description of the 438 in Russia,

81

Livermore on the law of principal
Domestic Happiness, the art of, and and agent, a review of

920
other poems, review of
72 Leipsic Fair, account of

258
Demetrius, an epic poem, review Longwood, a visit to

261
of
227 Lithography,

350

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80

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174

on

.

Lithographical drawings, observa Pimento, chemical analysis of
tions on a series of

430 Plague in Malta, description of the,
in 1813

244
Minerals, instruments to distin Polish peasantry, account of the 260
guish

80 Portuguese literature, fragments
Men of science, brief notice of the

304
labours of

121 Physiognomist, the, a novel, review
Manson, memoirs of Madame, &c. of

409
review of
135 Persian city, noises of a

433
Method of taking out spots in cloth, Persia, entry of the king of, into
silk, &c.
335 Teberan,

434
Madras, description of

344
Matignon, obituary notice of the Rambles in Italy, by an American,
Rev. Francis Anthony
421 review of

1
Mount Ararat, description of 434 Rome, Naples, and Florence, in

1817, review of

ib
North Pole, former approaches to Russian History, by an American, 107
the
75 Royal Institute of France,

264
New musical instrument, account

Rice, analysis of

346
of

76 Rittenhouse, biographical notice of
New Harpoon,
ib. David

353

Rio Janeiro, description of 432
Opera salaries,

262
Old Bachelor, the review of 265 Stael, Madame de, notice of 89

Sierra Leone, letter from

174
Poetry—To Pleasure,

175 Steam Engine, new account of 249
The Madman's Grave,

176 Silk, efficacy of in repelling a musk-
The Dinner of Law,
350 et ball,

259
Poets of Great Britain, eighth lec Salt, medical properties of 349
ture of Mr. Hazlett on the 79 Spanish affairs, letter on

419
Paris, recent publication in

86 Steam Printing Presses in France, 436
Poetry-Lines accompanying the Spanish America, Bonycastle's His-
view of com. Macdonaugh's farm, 88

437
Pennsylvania, sketch of the internal

improvements made by, review Tunis, interesting researches in 175
of

148 Thompson's System of Chemistry,
Peter the Great,

162 with notes by T. Cooper, M. D.
Pompeii and Herculaneum, new review of

405
opinion in regard to

166
Political Portraits–M. de Calonne, Utility of insects,

347
169— Mounier and Malouet, ib University of Edinburgh, system of
Mirabeau, 170—M. de la Fay education, pursued at the 426
ette, 171-Mr. Pitt and Mr. Fox,
ib--Robespierre and Danton, 172 Voltaire, epigram on

167
-Emperor Alexander, ib—M,
de Talleyrand, 173–The Abbe Woodworth, the poems, odes, &c.
Sieyes--ib.

&c. of, review of

tory of

66

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Art. I. Rambles in Italy, in the Years 1816-17; by an American.

Baltimore 1818.Remarks on Antiquities, Arts and Letters, during an Excursion in

Italy, in the years 1802-3; by Joseph Forsyth, Esq. from the

second London edition.— Boston, 1818. Rome, Naples, and Florence, in 1817; by the Count de Stendhall.

London 1818. THE NHE historical works of Roscoe have been reprinted and much

read in these States;--Shakspeare, whose muse alights so often and fondly beyond the Alps, has, perhaps, more devotees here, than at home; the Latin Classics are by no means confined to the colleges of the atlantic coast, but form a considerable part of the business of all the great schools with which even the basin of the Mississippi now abounds;-and yet it may be asserted with confidence, that there is no portion of Europe in which Americans in general take less interest than in Italy. The fine arts, of which she continues to enjoy the palm, have hitherto touched them but feebly;-in looking abroad, they have been, as was natural, engrossed by the countries with which their relations of politics and trade were most important; and, in truth, ancient literature and history, though constituents of their education, are rarely so taught and studied with them, as to create a spirit of philosophical investigation, or perpetuate a liberal curiosity.

We have many reasons for wishing the attention of the present generation of our countrymen to be attracted to modern Italy. It would incessantly carry them back to the Roman philosophy and character, the strength, solidity, and elevation of which are so congenial with our institutions;—it would produce a taste and zeal for that branch of the fine arts, architecture—which seems to belong especially, by inheritance and affinity, to a republican people: If it should, according to its natural tendency, the more speedily bring all those arts into favour and activity, we need not say how much would be gained on the score of refinement and reputation.

The Italy of the middle ages,--when liberty had no other temple, and gave her four centuries of sway and glory,--is a most in

1

VOL. XII.

teresting field of instruction for an American citizen. Her republics of that period* furnish unique examples of the character and part which the merchant and tradesman may sustain in free governments; of the exalted ends to which their pursuits may be rendered subservient. In her lapse into servitude, in her present abjection, she may be still contemplated with profit, and be instrumental in checking that treacherous security to which a nation, so happily situated as the American, must be ever prone.

Altogether, the Italian Peninsula has more magnificent annals, various trophies, and choice gifts, than any other portion of the earth remarkable as the theatre of moral greatness. The destinies of Greece were, indeed, splendid; her achievements prodigious; the creations of her fancy unrivalled: But her history has not the sweep, majesty, variety, and instructiveness of the Roman; it begins, properly, with the establishment of the laws of Lycurgus, and ends with the death of Alexander:-She had no resurrection. Italy fills in some sort all ages, since the formation of the Roman power; she re-appears dispensing light and Christianity, after she had ceased to dispense laws, to the universe; she takes the lead among the nations of the west, and reclaims Europe from barbarism; she establishes a new and mighty influence over mankind, and, in restoring the literature of the ancients, produces one of her own, not unworthy of them, or of being compared with the best of the modern. In her present reprobate state of morals and politics, hers is still the empire of the arts; she cultivates the exact sciences with brilliant success; possesses a vast body of erudition; is strong in numbers and not deficient in wealth; retains her physical advantages, and receives from nature the same rich endowments of mind: She draws to her from every quarter the enlightened and the curious, as much on account of what she is as what she was, and inspires not a few of them with hopes of her regaining the energies which would soon replace her in the first rank of independent nations.

After what has been said, we scarcely need suggest that it gave us infinite pleasure to see the travels of Eustace and Forsyth republished and circulated in this country. Eustace envelopes his

* We do not know any more useful addition that could be made to our stock of books, than a good translation or judicious abridgment of Sismondi's history of those republics. It is to be regretted that none of our public libraries possesses a complete collection of the modern Latin poets of Italy, who, as Eustace remarks, restored the pure taste of antiquity. We should have access to the works of all the fine geniuses celebrated in the 16th and 17th chapters of the 3d volume of Roscoe's Leo 10th.

† And even since, and now, fair Italy!
Thou art the garden of the world, the home
Of all art yields, and Nature can decree;
Even in thy desert, what is like to thee?
Thy very weeds are beautiful, thy waste
More rich than other clime's fertility;
Thy wreck a glory. Canto IV. Childe Harold.

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