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competent to sit in judgment than any scientific or philological expert of the present day.

We listen to the jargon of biblical criticism of to-day that comes from the giant intellects on both sides of the waters. We admire the learning and research and respect the honesty of many of them; while we are left in utter confusion as to just how much Scripture we have, or whether indeed we have any or not.

From these we turn to the great Apostle to the Greeks and Romans. In breadth of intellect, in sweep of vision, in consecration to the truth, and in originality of research, he is more than a match for all of them. While he speaks from the vantage-ground of a nearer and clearer view, and of a much “higher criticism” than any of their most able exponents, whose testimony shall we receive? For my own part, I would not exchange an uninspired opinion of the Apostle Paul on the things concerning the kingdom of Christ for the mature and unanimous verdict of all these modern critics combined. What the Apostle gives us is reasonable, clear, and convincing, and provides us with a sure foundation on which to stand. He seals to us the “faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation,” that “all Scripture is given by inspiration of God.” And while he and the other Apostles bear their perpetual testimony down through the ages, there comes also the ever-living, neverchanging voice from above, These are my witnesses, hear ye them.

THE WONDERFUL BOOK.

JAMES E. GILBERT, D.D.

The honey-bee constructs a waxen cell and deposits therein its future food, made of sweet juices extracted from the flowers. Men marvel at the tiny store-house, its delicious contents, and the adaptation of each to the other, as exhibitions of an intelligence and skill possessed only by the provident insect. So our Bible is a depository of precious truths. Its structure is unique, well fitted to receive and preserve what is there laid up for the edification and comfort of mankind. The volume presents to the student of to-day a series of wonders——the marks of its superhuman authorship.

I. The first wonder which we shall mention is the unity of its Testaments.

The two great parts into which the book is divided were written to set forth two great systems of religion-the Jewish and the Christian. Outwardly these religions were totally dissimilar. The former was designed for a single people—the descendants of Abraham. It was in close relations with the civil government. Its ministers and houses of worship were supported chiefly from the public treasury, and were frequently used as political agencies. It had an elaborate and expensive ceremonial. It enacted many laws for the preservation of race purity, for the integrity and defense of the nation, for the good order of society, for the regulation of domestic life, for the government of the priesthood, for the observance of times and seasons, and for the administration of rites.

The Christian religion was designed for all the posterity of Adam; it offered no barrier to the freest intercourse of the races; it required every disciple to be a world-wide propagandist. It sought no alliance with the State-it allowed none; it openly proclaimed its kingdom as not of this world. It depended not upon taxes, but upon gifts, and it measured these not by tithes, but by ability. It prescribed no forms of worship; its only ordinances, the initiative baptism and the memorial supper, were not regulated by rules. It compressed all laws into two-love to God and love to man.

The Testaments are full records of these widely dissimilar religions—their rise, progress, and establishment; their doctrine, practice, and spirit. So perfect are the records that the devotee might have learned therein concerning all his duties and privileges, and, if both systems of religion were to perish from the earth, they might be reproduced, with all their distinguishing characteristics, from these same old documents. And yet the two Testaments, written by two classes of men for distinct and separate purposes, when brought together are found to be parts of one great whole. There is a vital and organic connection between them. Neither is perfect without the other. In fact the New is an expected outcome and produet, the natural expansion and complement of the Old. And what is more remarkable--on reading the entire volume, whose two Testaments are bound together by delicate threads running through both-one discovers that in reality there were not two religions, but one religion ; that Judaism was the preparatory and Christianity the final form of one great covenant between the eternal Father and IIis erring children.

How shall such unity be explained? It could not have been fortuitous. Neither could it have come through human wisdom alone. For who shall penetrate below the

surface of things and discover the purpose of the Almighty? And who shall so describe passing events that in the sequel they shall appear but parts of one plan covering the ages! And who is able to make dissimilar things agree? Besides, the conditions under which the Biblical writers performed their tasks precluded any concerted action among them. The Old Testament, completed four centuries before the Christian era began, could not have been shaped with reference to subsequent writings. The New Testament penmen, acting as mere men, had many reasons for laying an entirely new foundation. Christianity came to succeed or displace Judaism. It proposed to abolish venerable institutions as no longer needed, and change the customs and manners of the people. How natural the inference that with these institutions, customs, and manners, the books wherein they were taught should likewise be rejected! Many well-informed disciples have reached that conclusion: sects have been built upon it. Moreover, the founders of the Christian system were hated and persecuted by the dignitaries of the Jewish Church. Remembering the death of their Master, smarting under a sense of personal wrong, how could the writers of the New Testament become the authors of the second half of the sacred volume, ingeniously fitting it to the first half then in the custody of their enemies?

It may be replied that Christianity was evolved from Judaism ; that Christ fulfilled Messianic prophecies; that the writers only recognized what had become historic; and that their only hope of success was to show the connection between the old and the new. Grant all this. But if there was an evolution, there must have been an involution. It follows that God established Judaism with such inherent properties that in the fullness of time it could be transformed into Christianity, and the essentials of spiritual life be retained. But how were a few men

The Christian religion was designed for all the posterity of Adam ; it offered no barrier to the freest intercourse of the races; it required every disciple to be a world-wide propagandist. It sought no alliance with the State, --it allowed none; it openly proclaimed its kingdom as not of this world. It depended not upon taxes, but upon gifts, and it measured these not by tithes, but by ability. It prescribed no forms of worship; its only ordinances, the initiative baptism and the memorial supper, were not regulated by rules. It compressed all laws into two-love to God and love to man.

The Testaments are full records of these widely dissimilar religions--their rise, progress, and establishment; their doctrine, practice, and spirit. So perfect are the records that the devotee might have learned therein concerning all his duties and privileges, and, if both systems of religion were to perish from the earth, they might be reproduced, with all their distinguishing characteristics, from these same old documents. And yet the two Testaments, written by two classes of men for distinct and separate purposes, when brought together are found to be parts of one great whole. There is a vital and organic connection between them. Neither is perfect without the other. In fact the New is an expected outcome and produet, the natural expansion and complement of the Old. And what is more remarkable-on reading the entire volume, whose two Testaments are bound together by delicate threads running through both-one discovers that in reality there were not two religions, but one religion ; that Judaism was the preparatory and Christianity the final form of one great covenant between the eternal Father and IIis erring children.

Hlow shall such unity be explained? It could not have been fortuitous. Neither could it have come through human wisdom alone. For who shall penetrate below the

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