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subchapter since the effective date of the Arms Export Control Act, Public Law 94-329, 90 Stat. 729 (June 30, 1976), or is ineligible to contract with, or to receive a license or other approval to import defense articles or defense services from, or to receive an export license or other approval from any agency of the U.S. government; and

(4) The natural person signing the application, notification or other request for approval (including the statement required by this subsection) is a citizen or national of the United States, has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence (and maintains such a residence) under the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1101(a), section 101(a)20, 60 Stat. 163), or is an official of a foreign government entity in the United States.

(b) In addition, all applications for licenses must include, on the application or an addendum sheet, the complete names and addresses of all U.S. consignors and freight forwarders, and all foreign consignees and foreign intermediate consignees involved in the transaction. If there are multiple consignors, consignees or freight forwarders, and all the required information cannot be included on the application form, an addendum sheet and seven copies containing this information must be provided. The addendum sheet must be marked at the top as follows: “Attachment to Department of State License From (insert DSP-5, 61, 73, or 85, as appropriate) for Export of (insert commodity) valued at (insert U.S. dollar amount) to (insert country of ultimate destination).” The Office of Defense Trade Controls will impress one copy of the addendum sheet with the Department of State seal and return it to the applicant with each license. The sealed addendum sheet must remain attached to the license as an integral part thereof. District Directors of Customs and Department of Defense transmittal authorities will permit only those U.S. consignors or freight forwarders listed on the license or sealed addendum sheet to make shipments under the license, and only to those foreign consignees named on the documents. Applicants should list all freight forwarders who may be in

volved with shipments under the license to ensure that the list is complete and to avoid the need for amendments to the list after the license has been approved. If there are unusual or extraordinary circumstances that preclude the specific identification of all the U.S. consignors and freight forwarders and all foreign consignees, the applicant must provide a letter of explanation with each application.

(c) In cases when foreign nationals are employed at or assigned to security-cleared facilities, provision by the applicant of a Technology Control Plan (available from the Defense Investigative Service) will facilitate processing. $126.14 Special comprehensive export

authorizations for NATO, Australia,

and Japan. (a) With respect to NATO members, Australia, and Japan, the Office of Defense Trade Controls may provide the comprehensive authorizations described below for circumstances where the full parameters of a commercial export endeavor including the needed defense exports can be well anticipated and described in advance, thereby making use of such comprehensive authorizations appropriate.

(1) Major Project Authorization. With respect to NATO members, Australia, and Japan, the Office of Defense Trade Controls may provide comprehensive authorizations for well circumscribed commercially developed "major projects”, where a principal registered U.S. exporter/prime contractor identifies in advance the broad parameters of a commercial project including defense exports needed, other participants (e.g., exporters with whom they have "teamed up”, subcontractors), and foreign government end users. Projects eligible for such authorization may include a commercial export of a major weapons system for a foreign government involving, for example, multiple U.S. suppliers under a commercial teaming agreement to design, develop and manufacture defense articles to meet a foreign government's requirements. U.S. exporters seeking such authorization must provide detailed information concerning the scope of the project, including other exporters, U.S. subcontractors, and planned exports (including re-exports) of defense articles, defense services, and technical data, and meet the other requirements set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.

(2) Major Program Authorization. With respect to NATO members, Australia, and Japan, the Office of Defense Trade Controls may provide comprehensive authorizations for well circumscribed commercially developed “major program". This variant would be available where a single registered U.S. exporter defines in advance the parameters of a broad commercial program for which the registrant will be providing all phases of the necessary support (including the needed hardware, tech data, defense services, development, manufacturing, and logistic support). U.S. exporters seeking such authorization must provide detailed information concerning the scope of the program, including planned exports (including re-exports) of defense articles, defense services, and technical data, and meet the other requirements set forth below in paragraph (b) of this section.

(3)(i) Global Project Authorization. With respect to NATO members, Australia and Japan, the Office of Defense Trade Controls may provide a comprehensive “Global Project Authorization” to registered U.S. exporters for exports of defense articles, technical data or defense services in support of government to government cooperative projects (covering research and development or production) with one of these countries undertaken pursuant to an agreement between the USG and the government of such country, or a memorandum of understanding between the Department of Defense and the country's Ministry of Defense.

(ii) A set of standard terms and conditions derived from and corresponding to the breadth of the activities and phases covered in such a cooperative MOU will provide the basis for this comprehensive authorization for all U.S. exporters (and foreign end users) identified by DoD as participating in such cooperative project. Such authorizations may cover a broad range of defined activities in support of such programs including multiple shipments of defense articles and technical data and performance of defense services for ex

tended periods, and re-exports to approved end users.

(iii) Eligible end users will be limited to ministries of defense of MOU signatory countries and foreign companies serving as contractors of such countries.

(iv) Any requirement for non-transfer and use assurances from a foreign government may be deemed satisfied by the signature by such government of a cooperative agreement or by its ministry of defense of a cooperative MOU where the agreement or MOU contains assurances that are comparable to that required by a DSP-83 with respect to foreign governments and that clarifies that the government is undertaking responsibility for all its participating companies. The authorized non-government participants or end users (e.g., the

participating government's contractors) will still be required to execute DSP-83's.

(4) Technical Data Supporting an ACquisition, Teaming Arrangement, Merger, Joint Venture Authorization. With respect to NATO member countries, Australia and Japan, the Office of Defense Trade Controls may provide a registered U.S. defense company a comprehensive authorization to export technical data in support of the U.S. exporter's consideration of entering into a teaming arrangement, joint venture, merger, acquisition, or similar arrangement with prospective foreign partners. Specifically the authorization is designed to permit the export of a broadly defined set of technical data to qualifying well established foreign defense firms in NATO countries, Australia or Japan in order to better facilitate a sufficiently in depth assessment of the benefits, opportunities and other relevant considerations presented by such prospective arrangements. U.S exporters seeking such authorization must provide detailed information concerning the arrangement, joint venture, merger or acquisition, including any planned exports of defense articles, defense services, and technical data, and meet the other requirements set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Provisions and Requirements for Comprehensive Authorizations. Requests for the special comprehensive authorizations set forth in paragraph (a) of rameters for the major program or project or cooperative project should be possible, with additional notifications such as those required by law for changes in value or other significant modifications.

(5) All authorizations will be consistent with all other applicable requirements of the ITAR, including requirements for non-transfer and use assurances (see $$ 123.10 and 124.10), congressional notifications (e.g., $$ 123.15 and 124.11), and other documentation (e.g., SS 123.9 and 126.13).

(6) Special auditing and reporting requirements will also be required for these authorizations. Exporters using special authorizations are required to establish an electronic system for keeping records of all defense articles, defense services and technical data exported and comply with all applicable requirements for submitting shipping or export information within the allotted time. [65 FR 45285, July 21, 2000)

PART 127—VIOLATIONS AND

PENALTIES

this section should be by letter addressed to the Office of Defense Trade Control. With regard to a commercial major program or project authorization, or technical data supporting a teaming arrangement, merger, joint venture or acquisition, registered U.S. exporters may consult the Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls about eligibility for and obtaining available comprehensive authorizations set forth in paragraph (a) of this section or pursuant to § 126.9(b).

(1) Requests for consideration of all such authorizations should be formulated to correspond to one of the authorizations set out in paragraph (a) of this section, and should include:

(i) A description of the proposed program or project, including where appropriate a comprehensive description of all phases or stages; and

(ii) Its value; and

(iii) Types of exports needed in support of the program or project; and

(iv) Projected duration of same, within permissible limits; and

(v) Description of the exporter's plan for record keeping and auditing of all phases of the program or project; and

(vi) In the case of authorizations for exports in support of government to government cooperative projects, identification of the cooperative project.

(2) Amendments to the requested authorization may be requested in writing as appropriate, and should include a detailed description of the aspects of the activities being proposed for amendment.

(3) The comprehensive authorizations set forth in paragraph (a) of this section may be made valid for the duration of the major commercial program or project, or cooperative project, not to exceed 10 years.

(4) Included among the criteria required for such authorizations are those set out in Part 124, e.g., $$ 124.7, 124.8 and 124.9, as well as $$ 125.4 (technical data exported in furtherance of an agreement) and 123.16 (hardware being included in an agreement). Provisions required will also take into account the congressional notification requirements in $$ 123.15 and 124.11 of the ITAR. Specifically, comprehensive congressional notifications corresponding to the comprehensive pa

Sec. 127.1 Violations. 127.2 Misrepresentation and omission of

facts. 127.3 Penalties for violations. 127.4. Authority of U.S. Customs Service of

ficers. 127.5 Authority of the Defense Investigative

Service. 126.6 Seizure and forfeiture in attempts at

illegal exports. 127.7 Debarment. 127.8 Interim suspension. 127.9 Applicability of orders. 127.10 Civil penalty. 127.11 Past violations. 127.12 Voluntary disclosures.

AUTHORITY: Secs. 2. 38, and 42, Pub. L. 90 629, 90 Stat. 744 (22 U.S.C. 2752, 2778, 2791% E.O. 11958. 42 FR 4311, 3 CFR. 1977 Comp., p. 79: 22 U.S.C. 401: 22 U.S.C. 2658; 22 U.S.C. 2779a; 22 L'.S.C. 2780.

SOURCE: 58 FR 39316, July 22, 1993, unless otherwise noted.

$127.1 Violations.

(a) It is unlawful:

(1) To export or attempt to export from the United States any defense article or technical data or to furnish

(2) Order, buy, receive, use, sell, deliver, store, dispose of, forward, transport, finance, or otherwise service or participate in any transaction which may involve any defense article or the furnishing of any defense service for which a license or approval is required by this subchapter for export, where such debarred, suspended, or ineligible person may obtain any benefit therefrom or have any direct or indirect interest therein.

(d) No person may willfully cause, or aid, abet, counsel, demand, induce, procure or permit the commission of any act prohibited by, or the omission of any act required by 22 U.S.C. 2778, 22 U.S.C. 2779, or any regulation, license, approval, or order issued thereunder.

any defense service for which a license or written approval is required by this subchapter without first obtaining the required license or written approval from the Office of Defense Trade Controls;

(2) To import or attempt to import any defense article whenever a license is required by this subchapter without first obtaining the required license or written approval from the Office of Defense Trade Controls;

(3) To conspire to export, import, reexport or cause to be exported, imported or reexported, any defense article or to furnish any defense service for which a license or written approval is required by this subchapter without first obtaining the required license or written approval from the Office of Defense Trade Controls; or

(4) To violate any of the terms or conditions of licenses or approvals granted pursuant to this subchapter.

(b) Any person who is granted a license or other approval under this subchapter is responsible for the acts of employees, agents, and all authorized persons to whom possession of the licensed defense article or technical data has been entrusted regarding the operation, use, possession, transportation, and handling of such defense article or technical data abroad. All persons abroad subject to U.S. jurisdiction who obtain temporary custody of a defense article exported from the United States or produced under an agreement described in part 124 of this subchapter, and irrespective of the number of intermediate transfers, are bound by the regulations of this subchapter in the same manner and to the same extent as the original owner or transferer.

(c) A person with knowledge that another person is then ineligible pursuant to $$ 120.1(c) of this subchapter or 126.7 of this chapter, is then subject to an order of debarment, or interim suspension, may not, directly or indirectly, in any manner or capacity, without prior disclosure of the facts to, and written authorization from, the Office of Defense Trade Controls:

(1) Apply for, obtain, or use any export control document as defined in $127.2(b) for such debarred, suspended, or ineligible person; or

$ 127.2 Misrepresentation and omis

sion of facts. (a) It is unlawful to use any export or temporary import control document containing a false statement or misrepresenting or omitting a material fact for the purpose of exporting any defense article or technical data or the furnishing of any defense service for which a license or approval is required by this subchapter. Any false statement, misrepresentation, or omission of material fact in an export or temporary import control document will be considered as made in a matter within the jurisdiction of a department or agency of the United States for the purposes of 18 U.S.C. 1001, 22 U.S.C. 2778 and 22 U.S.C. 2779.

(b) For the purpose of this section, export or temporary import control documents include the following:

(1) An application for a permanent export or a temporary import license and supporting documents.

(2) Shipper's Export Declaration. (3) Invoice. (4) Declaration of destination. (5) Delivery verification. (6) Application for temporary export. (7) Application for registration. (8) Purchase order. (9) Foreign import certificate. (10) Bill-of-lading. (11) Airway bill. (12) Nontransfer and use certificate.

(13) Any other document used in the regulation or control of a defense article, defense service or technical data for which a license or approval is required by this subchapter.

may take appropriate action to ensure compliance with the Department of Defense Industrial Security Manual. Upon a request to the Defense Investigative Service regarding the export of any classified defense article or technical data, the Defense Investigative Service official or a designated government transmittal authority may require the production of other relevant documents and information relating to the proposed export.

$ 127.3 Penalties for violations.

Any person who willfully:

(a) Violates any provision of section 38 or section 39 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778 and 2779), or any undertaking specifically required by part 124 of this subchapter; or

(b) In a registration, license application or report required by section 38 or section 39 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2278 and 2779) or by any rule or regulation issued under either section, makes any untrue statement of a material fact or omits a material fact required to be stated therein or necessary to make the statements therein not misleading, shall, upon conviction, be subject to a fine or imprisonment, or both, as prescribed by 22 U.S.C. 2778(c).

$ 127.4 Authority of U.S. Customs Serv

ice officers. (a) U.S. Customs Service officers may take appropriate action to ensure observance of this subchapter as to the export or the attempted export of any defense article or technical data, including the inspection of loading or unloading of any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft. This applies whether the export is authorized by license or by written approval issued under this subchapter.

(b) U.S. Customs Service officers have the authority to investigate, detain or seize any export or attempted export of defense articles or technical data contrary to this subchapter.

(c) Upon the presentation to a Customs Officer of a license or written approval authorizing the export of any defense article, the customs officer may require the production of other relevant documents and information relating to the proposed export. This includes an invoice, order, packing list, shipping document, correspondence, instructions, and the documents otherwise required by the U.S. Customs Service. 8 127.5 Authority of the Defense Inves

tigative Service. In the case of exports involving classified technical data or defense articles, the Defense Investigative Service

§ 127.6 Seizure and forfeiture in at

tempts at illegal exports. (a) An attempt to export from the United States any defense articles in violation of the provisions of this subchapter constitutes an offense punishable under section 401 of title 22 of the United States Code. Whenever it is known or there is probable cause to believe that any defense article is intended to be or is being or has been exported or removed from the United States in violation of law, such article and any vessel, vehicle or aircraft involved in such attempt is subject to seizure, forfeiture and disposition as provided in section 401 of title 22 of the United States Code.

(b) Similarly, an attempt to violate any of the conditions under which a temporary export or temporary import license was issued pursuant to this subchapter or to violate the requirements of $123.2 of this subchapter also constitutes an offense punishable under section 401 of title 22 of the United States Code, and such article, together with any vessel, vehicle or aircraft involved in any such attempt is subject to seizure, forfeiture, and disposition as provided in section 401 of title 22 of the United States Code.

$ 127.7 Debarment.

(a) In implementing section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act, the Assistant Secretary of State for PoliticoMilitary Affairs may prohibit any person from participating directly or indirectly in the export of defense articles, including technical data or in the furnishing of defense services for which a license or approval is required by this subchapter for any of the reasons listed below. Any such prohibition is referred to as a debarment for purposes of this

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