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COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS.

There are seventy-seven free scholarships distributed to the different counties of the State, in proportion to the school population, as follows:

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HOW TO SECURE A FREE SCHOLARSHIP.

Teachers or those intending to teach, may secure scholarships in their county to the number allotted, as follows:

1. The applicant must pass such an examination before the superintendent of his county as will entitle him to a second-grade certificate for teachers, and pay the examiner $2.50 therefor, if at a private examination. The regular public examinations held once each quarter, are free. If the applicant for a scholarship has at any time received a certificate to teach in this State, a re-examination is not required.

2. He must sign a declaration of the following form:

188

a resident of-

I, --county, Oregon, being in sound bodily health, and desiring to fit myself for teaching, hereby make ap plication for a scholarship in the Oregon State Normal School at Monmouth, declaring it to be my intention to teach in the public schools of this State for a period of time at least as great as that spent on this scholarship,in the State

Normal School.

(Signed.)

The superintendent will then give the applicant a certificate of the following form:

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198..

This certifies that

being a citizen of..

County, has applied for a scholarship for this county, in the Oregon State Normal School at Monmouth. Having passed the required examination and signed a declaration of intention to teach, and being good morals I recommend as a worthy representative of this county.

(Signed.)

Superintendent.

county, Oregon.

The superintendent will file the declaration in his office, and the applicant will bring the certificate and present it to the president of the normal school who will issue to the party a scholarship, good during the time of his continuous attendance at school. But an absence of one entire term will make the scholarship vacant.

GRADUATION.

The conditions of graduation are, that applicants shall have completed the course of study and passed such an examination thereon, as may be approved by the State board of education; that they shall have spent at least one year in this school; that males shall be twenty-one years of age, and females eighteen.

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One year.

First term

Object Teaching. Use of Apparatus.

Arithmetic.

Geography and Map

Drawing.

English Grammar

and Analysis.

Elocution or Vocal

Music.

Second lerm

Methods in Arithmetic

and Grammar.

Arithmetic.

Mental Arithmetic.

English Grammar

and Analysis.

Penmanship or
Vocal Music.

Third term

Methods in Geography,
Reading and History.

Arithmetic.

l'. s. History

English Grammar and Composition,

Elocution or
Penmanship.

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THE NORMAL SYSTEM OF

The principles of normal teaching are derived from the experience of mankind-from the careful observations and inductions of the best thinkers of all times, many of whom have given their lives to the development of correct methods of instruction. The work of summing up the results achieved by the world's great teachers and arranging them into a system of instruction, has been accomplished mainly through the agency of normal schools within half a century past. The inductions have been so carefully made that it is believed that the present system of education as taught and practiced in the normal schools is correct in principle and in perfect accord with the laws of human development.

CARDINAL PRINCIPLES.

1. That education is the accumulation of mental, moral and physical power, by self-development through voluntary effort, and so is much more than the mere acquisition of knowledge from prescribed tasks and is not the result of compulsory study.

EDUCATION.

2. That true government in education is self-government, induced by educating the higher nature of man, and not by a system of laws and penalties prescribed by boards of trustees and enforced by a faculty and spies.

3. That co-education of the sexes brings about better results in study and in government, makes better members of society and better citizens of the State.

THE WORK OF THE NORMAL SCHOOL

Is especially that of preparing teachers for the duties of the classroom, either in graded or ungraded schools, high schools or colleges. The subject matter of a carefully prepared course of study is most thoroughly and systematically taught, but school management and the methods of teaching constitute the prominent and distinctive feature of the normal school. In the college the studies are pursued from the standpoint of the learner, while in the normal school a two-fold view of the subject is obtained; first, from the standpoint of the learner, and then from the standpoint of the teacher. More than this, every recitation is an answer to the question, "How shall I teach this subject?" In addition to this, regular professional classes are organized which meet daily for recitation in the science

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