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CHAPTER XX.

Adeline Weldron's visit to an invalid - Gratitude - Adeline imitates the virtues of her grandfather and mother Sorrowful incidentAdeline - Inconsistency of her father Adeline becomes the wife of a Missionary Her death in a foreign land.

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“I AM burdened with a weight of obligations,' said Mrs. Adams, a poor invalid, to Adeline Weldron, as she entered her sick-room.

• To whom?' inquired Adeline, smiling.

* To many kind friends,' answered the sick woman ; ' but to no one more than yourself, Miss Weldron.'

If I have done as much as duty required for you,' replied she, 'I am glad ; certainly I have done no more.'

"I think otherwise,' responded Mrs. Adams, affectionately extending her hand towards her young friend; I have abundant reason to feel grateful to you, but gratitude is so delightful an emotion to cherish, that I cannot feel

sorry it is so.'

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Adeline, who had taken the proffered hand of her suffering friend, gently pressed it, while an expression of kind feeling beamed from her countenance. You are a happy woman, Mrs. Adams, said the young lady, and I am almost tempted to envy you.'

I am not always happy, rejoined the other; sometimes I feel very much dissatisfied with my condition, and then I am very miserable ; much of the time, however, I trust I realize that my daily lot is appointed by Him who doeth all things well, and then I am contented; for

“I can do all things, and can bear

All suffering, if my Lord be near.” »

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We are poor creatures indeed,' said Adeline, unless we constantly obtain help from on high ; but I can stay only a few moments at this time. I wish to know exactly how you are this morning, and if there is any one article of food you particularly crave to-day, I wish you would tell me what it is.'

* Thank you, dear Miss Weldron;' then, having answered her questions, added, “I never, never can repay your kindness."

' 'I am more than paid already,' replied Adeline, with a smile, ‘for all the kind acts I have ever performed; you must not forget the encouraging remark that it is far “ more blessed to give than to receive."! She then bade Mrs. Adams good morning,' and walked cheerfully towards her home. On her way thither she stopped to procure some little articles of nourishment, which she soon prepared, after reaching her own dwelling, and sent immediately to the sick lady. At the time the servant handed these articles to the nurse, which were exceedingly grateful to the taste of the individual for whom they were intended, a lady was present to whom Mrs. Adams said, with a feeling of animation, 'Miss Weldron has indeed been a very kind friend to me during my illness, and from what I have seen and know of her, I believe she is kind and benevolent to all.'

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• The grand-daughter of such a man as Aaron Weldron could not well be expected to be otherwise,' answered the lady, as he was one of the kindest of the kind. The father of Adeline does not imitate all the virtues of his long-lamented parent, although he was, nominally, a Christian; the members of his family are often pained at his inconsistencies. It is true, continued the lady, “he is benevolent to the needy, and gives liberally on many occasions ; still there is an evident heartlessness and a want of refinement in each act he performs, which despoils it of its loveliness.'

• Does Adeline resemble her mother in character ? 'asked Mrs. Adams. • She does,' replied her friend.

I have never seen her,' responded the other, but have been told she has been for many years an invalid.' . That is true,' rejoined the lady; ‘yet in her feeble state of health she makes herself a blessing to all around her. There is one circumstance which occurred under my own observation, which will give you some idea of the character of this excellent woman, that I think you would like to hear me relate.'

“I am sure I shall,' said Mrs. Adams, for I am so much attached to her daughter. I love her even without seeing her, and like Cowper can say,

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“Friend of my friend, I love thee, though unknown,
And boldly call thee, being his, my own.”

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* This is often true,' answered the lady, of those who have feeling hearts --'

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Now let me hear your story,' said the sick woman, interrupting her.

Perhaps,' said her friend, ' you are aware that the house of Mr. Weldron is situated on the bank of a lake in the vicinity of a canal which was made not many years since. At the time this canal was being constructed, many of the sons of Green Erin came with their families and resided in shantees erected for their temporary shelter, in the neighbourhood of Mr. Weldron's farm.

One lovely evening, when I happened to be visiting this dear family, we were alarmed by a cry of distress. It was a fearful cry, and was caused by the sudden death of a woman who had lived in one of these huts. She had been for some time the victim of consumption ; still, those about her appeared to have been ignorant of the fact, and herself was insensible, too, of her danger. The husband of this woman, on going home at night from his work, to his great consternation, found his wife in the agonies of death. He knew not that she was dying, but thinking her “very bad," as he expressed himself, he screamed aloud for help, cry. ing, “ Do go and fetch the doctor do go and tell him to come soon, or she will be dead.”

On hearing this distressing cry, Mrs. Weldron sent to inquire the cause. The messenger soon returned and informed us of what I have related. He said, “ the poor woman has just died — she was dead before the physician saw her. It would make your hearts bleed," continued he, “ to see the little girl who has been left motherless by this dispensation of Providence; she mourns as if she indeed realized the loss of a mother."

Our hearts, as may be imagined, were pained by the

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recital of these facts, and Mrs. Weldron at once determined to do all she could to alleviate the sorrows of these afflicted ones. As the weather was exceedingly warm, the remains of the poor Irish woman had of necessity to be buried on the next day after her death. Poor little Margaret, for that was the name of the child bereaved of her mother, felt sad indeed when the face of that friend was forever hidden from her view. She had a father and a brother, yet she felt lonely; and she was alone, though surrounded by a motley throng of her own country-people. There were none who seemed to care for her.

The forlorn situation of little Margaret drew forth the tenderest sympathies of Mrs. Weldron, and she said not to the helpless child, “Be warmed, fed, and clothed,” as too many do, without relieving the necessities of the dependant, but she kindly took her to her own dwelling, assuring the helpless little one that she should ever find in her a friend. Margaret was a bright, interesting child, and in many respects was a comfort to her benefactress. She lived with this lady until she was old enough to take care of herself. This is but one of the many instances which might be adduced to show the benevolence of this kind lady. The scenes which daily occur in her house, constantly exemplify the religion professed by Mrs. Weldron and her daughter.'

This last observation was most truthfully affirmed. The influence of piety was continually felt wherever these individuals were called to act. Many years rapidly succeeded each other, without the occurrence of any uncommon event. It is true Mrs. Weldron was often prostrated by debilitating disease, to which she was subject, and during

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