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FOLLOWING THE DANFORTH REPORT:
DEFINING THE NEXT STEP ON THE PATH TO

PEACE IN SUDAN

HEARING

BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTH CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

JUNE 5, 2002

Serial No. 107-100

Printed for the use of the Committee on International Relations

Available via the World Wide Web: http://www.house.gov/international relations
COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

80–060PDF

WASHINGTON : 2002

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
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HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois, Chairman
BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York

TOM LANTOS, California
JAMES A. LEACH, Iowa

HOWARD L. BERMAN, California
DOUG BEREUTER, Nebraska

GARY L. ACKERMAN, New York
CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American
DAN BURTON, Indiana

Samoa
ELTON GALLEGLY, California

DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida

ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey
CASS BALLENGER, North Carolina

SHERROD BROWN, Ohio
DANA ROHRABACHER, California

CYNTHIA A. MCKINNEY, Georgia
EDWARD R. ROYCE, California

EARL F. HILLIARD, Alabama
PETER T. KING, New York

BRAD SHERMAN, California
STEVE CHABOT, Ohio

ROBERT WEXLER, Florida
AMO HOUGHTON, New York

JIM DAVIS, Florida
JOHN M. MCHUGH, New York

ELIOT L. ENGEL, New York
JOHN COOKSEY, Louisiana

WILLIAM D. DELAHUNT, Massachusetts
THOMAS G. TANCREDO, Colorado

GREGORY W. MEEKS, New York
RON PAUL, Texas

BARBARA LEE, California
NICK SMITH, Michigan

JOSEPH CROWLEY, New York
JOSEPH R. PITTS, Pennsylvania

JOSEPH M. HOEFFEL, Pennsylvania
DARRELL E. ISSA, California

EARL BLUMENAUER, Oregon
ERIC CANTOR, Virginia

SHELLEY BERKLEY, Nevada
JEFF FLAKE, Arizona

GRACE NAPOLITANO, California
BRIAN D. KERNS, Indiana

ADAM B. SCHIFF, California
JO ANN DAVIS, Virginia

DIANE E. WATSON, California
MARK GREEN, Wisconsin

THOMAS E. MOONEY, SR., Staff Director/General Counsel

ROBERT R. KING, Democratic Staff Director
M. PATRICIA KATYOKA, Professional Staff Member

MARILYN C. OWEN, Staff Associate

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FOLLOWING THE DANFORTH REPORT: DEFINING THE NEXT STEP ON THE PATH TO PEACE IN SUDAN

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2002

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS,

Washington, DC. The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:57 a.m. in Room 2172, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Henry Hyde (Chairman of the Committee) presiding.

Chairman HYDE. The Committee will come to order.

As a result of the bloodiest war on the African continent somewhere in that land of misery today a child will die,

a mother will lose a limb, and a young woman will be enslaved. This is the reality in Sudan, a country at war, a terrible war. You have heard the numbers—2 million dead, and more than 5 million displaced. Despite these frightening numbers very little is being done to end the suffering of the helpless and the innocent.

Today's hearing is another effort, one of many in the past decade, to help push the quest for peace in Sudan. We cannot turn a blind eye to the suffering of the weak and the helpless civilians in southern Sudan, and we cannot pretend we do not know. We witness the suffering every day. It is incumbent upon us to do something, to do the right thing.

For almost 4 decades the East African country with a population of 35 million people has been the scene of intermittent conflict. The Sudanese conflict, Africa's longest running civil war, shows no sign of ending. The National Islamic Front Regime, which came to power by ousting a democratically elected government in 1989, continues to mount a brutal military campaign against its powerless masses in the south.

Unfortunately, a new generation of southern Sudanese are growing up in the midst of war and hopelessness; children are being killed and maimed by a government determined to exterminate its own people. In February, government helicopter gunships mowed down scores of civilians who were waiting in line for food at a United Nations feeding center. Seventeen people were killed and scores wounded.

This Committee processed the Sudan Peace Act. The House passed the bill by 422 to two in June 2001, and appointed conferees several months later. The act is an effort to address some of the problems facing Sudan and to provide assistance to those fighting for democracy and freedom, and to punish those who trade in blood

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