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O! my Love, my Love is young!
Age, I do defy thee-

sweet shepherd, hie thee,
For methinks thou stay'st too long.

William Shakespeare

149

THA

HAT time of year thou mayst in me behold

When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,

Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see'st the twilight of such day

As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,

Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire,

That on the ashes of his youth doth lie As the death-bed whereon it must expire,

Consumed with that which it was nourished by: -This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

William Shakespeare 150

FOR my sake do you with Fortune chide,

The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds,
That did not better for my life provide
Than public means which public manners breeds.
Thence comes it that my name receives a brand,
And almost thence my nature is subdued
To what it works in, like the dyer's hand:
Pity me then and wish I were renewed;
Whilst, like a willing patient, I will drink

Potions of eisel 'gainst my strong infection;
Eisel: vinegar

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No bitterness that I will bitter think,
Nor double penance, to correct correction.

Pity me then, dear friend, and I assure ye
Even that your pity is enough to cure me.

William Shakespeare

WHEN

151

HEN to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of

things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,

And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste; Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,

For precious friends hid in death's dateless night, And weep afresh love's long-since-canceled woe,

And moan the expense of many a vanished sight. Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,

And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,

Which I new pay as if not paid before: -But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, All losses are restored, and sorrows end.

William Shakespeare

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152
IKE as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,

So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,

In sequent toil all forwards do contend. Nativity, once in the main of light,

Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crowned, Crooked eclipses 'gainst his glory fight,

And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.

Expense: loss

Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth,

And delves the parallels in beauty's brow; Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth,

And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow: And yet, to times in hope, my verse shall stand Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.

William Shakespeare

SINCE

153

INCE brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,

But sad mortality o'ersways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,

Whose action is no stronger than a flower? O how shall summer's honey breath hold out

Against the wreckful siege of battering days, When rocks impregnable are not so stout

Nor gates of steel so strong, but time decays? O fearful meditation! where, alack!

Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid? Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back,

Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?
O! none, unless this miracle have might,
That in black ink my love may still shine bright.

William Shakespeare

154

OZYMANDIAS OF EGYPT

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I

MET a traveler from an antique land

Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,

Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold com mand

Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Spoil: destruction

d

Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,

d The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed; C

And on the pedestal these words appear: “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Percy Bysshe Shelley

55

F

'EAR no more the heat o' the sun

Nor the furious winter's rages;
Thou thy worldly task hast done,

Home art gone and ta'en thy wages:
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.

Fear no more the frown o' the great,

Thou art past the tyrant's stroke;
Care no more to clothe and eat;

To thee the reed is as the oak:
The scepter, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust,

Fear no more the lightning-flash

Nor the all-dreaded thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;

Thou hast finished joy and moan;
All lovers young, all lovers must
Consign to thee, and come to dust.

William Shakespeare

156

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OLDIER, rest! thy warfare o'er,

Slcep the sleep that knows not breaking;
Dream of battled fields no more,

Days of danger, nights of waking.
In our isle's enchanted hall,

Hands unseen thy couch are strewing,
Fairy strains of music fall,

Every sense in slumber dewing.
Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er,
Dream of fighting fields no more;
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking,
Morn of toil, nor night of waking.

No rude sound shall reach thine ear,

Armor's clang, or war-steed champing,
Trump nor pibroch summon here

Mustering clan or squadron tramping.
Yet the lark's shrill fife may come

At the daybreak from the fallow,
And the bittern sound his drum,

Booming from the sedgy shallow.
Ruder sounds shall none be near,
Guards nor warders challenge here,
Here's no war-steed's neigh and champing,
Shouting clans or squadrons stamping.

Huntsman, rest! thy chase is done;

While our slumbrous spells assail ye,
Dream not, with the rising sun,

Bugles here shall sound reveillé.

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