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SUMMARY

The mounting cost of veterans' relief is reaching staggering proportions. Already it has climbed to approximately $780,000,000 annually, distributed between the Veterans' Bureau, the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and the Pension Bureau. This is about 33 per cent of all income taxes collected by the Government annually.

It is essential that the President, the Budget, and the Congress should have these activities brought in under one agency so as to be able to visualize the whole picture. By placing them under one directing head overlapping and duplication can be wiped out; inequalities of care, treatment, pensions, and compensation will more readily lend themselves to adjustment; a proper distribution of beneficiaries can be effected with consequent great economies, and large sums can be saved in construction costs.

Finally, the new establishment will afford a suitable foundation upon which a humanized superstructure of legislation may be erected, based upon a thorough revision of existing laws dealing with veterans, and the creation of a simplified code that will iron out present inequalities and place all veterans of similar age and suffering similar disabilities upon approximately the same plane with respect to the relief extended, whether it be hospitalization, domiciliary care, pension, or compensation.

STATUTES REPEALED

Section 4835 of the Revised Statutes, which reads as follows is repealed:

All inmates of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers shall be subject to the rules and Articles of War, and in the same manner as if they were in the Army.

REPEALED BY IMPLICATION

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Section 71, title 24, United States Code:

Organization of home.—The President, Secretary of War, Chief Justice, and such other persons as from time to time may be associated with them, shall constitute a Board of Managers of an establishment for the care and relief of the disabled volunteers of the United States Army, to be known by the name and style of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and have perpetual succession, with powers to take, hold, and convey real and personal property, establish a common seal.

Section 72, title 24, United States Code:

Headquarters of home.—The headquarters of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers shall be established and maintained at the central branch, National Military Home, Ohio, and shall occupy for offices, without expenditures for rent, any general or post fund building.

Section 73, title 24, United States Code:

Election of citizen managers.-Seven managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers shall be elected from time to time, as vacancies occur, by joint resolution of Congress. They shall all be citizens of the United States and no two of them shall be residents of the same State. The terms of office of these managers shall be for six years and until a successor is elected.

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Section 74, title 24, United States Code:

Election of officers of Board of Managers. The ten managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers shall elect from their own number a president, who shall be the chief executive officer of the board, two vice presidents, and a secretary. Six of the board, of whom the president or one of the vice presidents shall be one, shall form a quorum for the transaction of business at any meeting of the board.

Section 75, title 24, United States Code: Expenses and salaries of managers and officers.—No member of the Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers shall receive any compensation or pay for any services or duties connected with the home; but the traveling and other actual expenses of a member, incurred while upon

the business of the home, may be reimbursable to such member: Provided, That the president and secretary of the Board of Managers may receive a reasonable compensation for their services as such officers, not exceeding $4,000 and $2,000, respectively, per annum.

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SENATE

718T CONGRESS

2d Session

REPORT No. 1131

BRIDGE ACROSS THE RAINY RIVER, BAUDETTE, MINN.

JUNE 28, 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. DALE, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 12233]

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The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 12233) authorizing the Robertson & Janin Co., of Montreal, Canada, its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Rainy River at Baudette, Minn., having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Departments of State and War, as will appear by the annexed House Report No. 1736, which is made a part of this report.

(House Report No. 1736, Seventy-first Congress, second session) The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 12233) authorizing the Robertson & Janin Co., of Montreal, Canada, its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Rainy River at Baudette, Minn., having considered and amended the game, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

Amend the bill as follows:

Page 2, line 23, strike out the word “Canada" and insert the word Minnesota" in lieu thereof.

Page 3, line 6, after the word "assigns” strike out the semicolon and insert a comma in lieu thereof.

The bill has the approval of the State and War Departments, as will appear by the letters attached.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May 13, 1930. Hon. James S. PARKER, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives. Sir: The department has received your letter of May 8, 1930, transmitting H. R. 12233, a bill to authorize the construction of a bridge across the Rainy River at or near Baudette, Minn., and requesting a report and comment thereon. I take pleasure in informing you that the proposed legislation is unobjectionable in so far as the foreign relations of the United States are concerned. Very truly yours,

J. P. Cotton, Undersecretary.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 15, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (H. R. 12233, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) authorizing the Robertson & Kanine Co., of Montreal, Canada, to construct a bridge across the Rainy River at or near Baudette, Minn. A minor change on page 2, line 3, has been indicated in red thereon.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., May 17, 1930. Hon. JAMES S. PARKER, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. PARKER: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (H. R. 12233) transmitted with your letter of May 8 with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

This bill would authorize the Robertson & Kanine Co., of Montreal, Canada, its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge and approaches thereto across the Rainy River at or near Baudette, Minn. The bill appears to conform to the form of bill

adopted by the committee for a privately owned international toll bridge. The Federal-aid system approved for Minnesota parallels the Rainy River through Baudette. A bridge at this point, therefore, would constitute a lateral connection between the Federal-aid system in Minnesota and the adjacent highway system in the Dominion of Canada. The department feels that it is a very grave mistake to allow important stream crossings to be taken up by private toll bridges even when such crossings are at the international boundary line. It, therefore, is not believed that a private toll bridge should be authorized at the point proposed in the bill. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

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