Imagini ale paginilor
PDF
ePub

Zd }

715T CONGRESS

SENATE

REPORT No. 1103

TABLET TO MEMORY OF GARRISON AT FORT SUMTER

DURING SIEGE, 1861

JUNE 26, 1930.--Ordered to be printed

Mr. REED, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 11409)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 11409) to authorize the erection of a tablet in the Fort Sumter Military Reservation to the memory of the garrison at Fort Sumter during the siege of 1861, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The merits of the bill are set forth in the House report thereon, which is made a part of this report, and reads as follows:

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11409) to authorize the erection of a tablet in the Fort Sumter Military Reservation to the memory of the garrison at Fort Sumter during the siege of 1861, introduced by Mr. Wainwright, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The history of Fort Sumter and the part played by its gallant command in the Civil War are outstanding, and it has generally been accepted as the beginning of that conflict. While the official records of the War Department and every authentic history of the United States contain accounts of the actions at Fort Sumter, no provision has ever been made by the Government for a tablet or marker on the reservation giving the names of all the members of the garrison at the time of its historic defense and surrender. In view of the political importance of this event, your committee recommends favorable action.

The report of the Secretary of War gives an explanation of the legislation and is made a part of this report, as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 4, 1930. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives

. DEAR MR. JAMES: Careful consideration has been given to the bill H. R. 11409, a bill “To authorize the erection of a tablet in the Fort Sumter military reservation to the memory of the garrison at Fort Sumter during the siege of 1861,” which you transmitted to the War Department under date of April 8, 1930, with a request for information and the views of the department relative thereto.

There are no applicable provisions of existing law on this subject, except the act of May 11, 1928, authorizing the erection at private expense of a flagstaff and memorial to Gen. Robert Anderson,

The history of Fort Sumter and the part played by its gallant command in the Civil War are outstanding, and the engagement resulting in its surrender has generally been accepted as the beginning of that great conflict. While the official records of the War Department and every authentic history of the United States contain accounts of the actions at Fort Sumter, no provision has been made heretofore by the Government for a special tablet or marker on the reservation giving the names of all of the members of the garrison at the time of its historic defense and surrender.

In the opinion of the War Department, a tablet or marker of the character proposed by the bill would serve as a means of honoring these gallant men and likewise perpetuating their names.

In view of the action of Congress in enacting the law approved May 11, 1928, for the erection at private expense of a flagstaff commemorating the defense of the fort by Gen. Robert Anderson, it would seem appropriate to provide a tablet or marker showing the names of the members of the garrison. For the above reasons the War Department recommends that the bill be enacted into law. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

}

{

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

REPORT No. 1104

TO SUPPLY WATER TO RESIDENTS IN MARYLAND

ADJACENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

JUNE 26, 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. CAPPER, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9408]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9408) to amend the act of March 3, 1917, an act making appropriations for the general expenses of the District of Columbia, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon, with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The purpose of the bill is to allow the supply of water to residents in Maryland in the vicinity of Forty-seventh and Fessenden Streets.

The bill is approved by the District Commissioners and by the Bureau of the Budget. It involves no expense on the part of the District, as all costs are to be paid by Maryland.

The House report on the bill is appended hereto, as part of this report.

(House Report No. 1853, Seventy first Congress, second session] The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom the bill H. R. 9408 was referred, and which amends the act of March 3, 1917, an act making appropriations for the general expenses of the District of Columbia, having considered the same, reports back to the House with the recommendation that the legislation do pass with the following amendment:

Page 2, line 15, strike our the words "Forty-ninth and Chesapeake" and insert in lieu thereof the words “Forty-seventh and Fessenden”.

The purpose of this bill is to make it possible to supply water to Maryland residents adjacent to the District in the vicinity of Forty-seventh and Fessenden Streets.

The act of March 3, 1917, provides that the District water mains may be tapped at certain specified points, named in the act. for the benefit of Maryland residents, but no provision was made for the tapping of the mains in the vicinity of Western Avenue. This measure is to take care of the residents in that locality, and the expense in connection with the project is to be borne by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission.

The Commissioners of the District recommend the passage of the bill, and their report is appended hereto and made a part of this report.

To comply with paragraph 2a of Rule XIII of the House of Representatives the change in existing law proposed by this bill is shown below. The proposed legislation will have the effect of striking out of the act of March 3, 1917, the language shown in black brackets and inserting the language shown in italics:

Paragraph 6, act of March 3, 1917:

“For the protection of the health of the residents of the District of Columbia and the employees of the United States Government residing in Maryland near the District of Columbia boundary the Commissioners of the District of Columbia, upon the request of the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, a body corporate, established by chapter 313 of the acts of 1916 of the State of Maryland, or upon the request of its legally appointed successor, are hereby authorized to deliver water from the water-supply system of the District of Columbia to said Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission or its successor for distribution to territory in Maryland within the Washington suburban sanitary district as designated in the aforesaid act, and to connect District of Columbia water mains with water mains in the State of Maryland at the following points, namely, in the vicinity of Chevy Chase Circle, in the vicinity of the intersection of Georgia and Eastern Avenues, in the vicinity of the intersection of Rhode Island and Eastern Ave [and] in the vicinity of the intersection of the Anacostia Road and Eastern Avenue, and in the vicinity of Forty-seventh and Fessenden Streets Northwest, under the conditions hereinafter named."

COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, April 8, 1930. Hon. F. N. ZIHLMAN, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR CONGRESSMAN ZIHLMAN: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to submit the following on H. R. 9408, Seventy-first Congress, second session, entitled “A bill to amend the act of March 3, 1917, an act making appropriations for the general expenses of the District of Columbia," which you transmitted to them for their consideration and report.

This bill proposes to amend the act of March 3, 1917, making appropriations for the general expenses of the District of Columbia, by authorizing the Commissioners of the District of Columbia, upon the request of the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, or upon the request of its legally appointed successors, to deliver water from the water-supply system of the District of Columbia to the said Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission or its successors for distribution to territory in Maryland within the Washington suburban sanitary district, and to connect District of Columbia water mains with water mains in the State of Maryland in the vicinity of Forty-ninth and Chesapeake Streets NW.

To supply water to Maryland at a connection in the vicinity of Forty-ninth and Chesapeake Streets NW. and at the same time provide adequate service for residents in the District of Columbia in this vicinity would require a connection from the 12-inch water main in Forty-seventh Street between Brandywine and Fessenden Streets. This main could be extended to Western Avenue, grade conditions permitting, through Fessenden, Davenport, Chesapeake, or Brandywine Streets, and in order to meet the needs of the District residents in this vicinity, the Maryland consumption would have to be limited to 100,000 gallons a day. To provide for the ultimate development which is to be expected in this vicinity would require a 20-inch connection from Forty-ninth and Upton Streets northward in Forty-ninth Street to Western Avenue; northeast in Western Avenue to Fessenden Street, and east in Fessenden Street to connect with an outlet in the 36-inch concrete main at Fessenden Street and Belt Road. Fessenden Street and Western Avenue are in public ownership, but Forty-ninth Street from Upton Street to Murdock Mill Road is not.

Pressure readings over a 24-hour period have been made in order to safeguard the interests of consumers in the District, and the limit of peak consumption for this proposed connection should not exceed 100,000 gallons per day until such time as the 20-inch main proposed for the ultimate development has been installed.

It is the opinion of the commissioners that this bill should be amended by striking out, on page 2, line 15 of the bill, the words "Forty-ninth and Chesapeake' and substituting therefor the words "Forty-seventh and Fessenden." This amendment, it is understood, will be satisfactory to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Bureau of the Budget Circulars No. 49 and No. 273, the commissioners requested information from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget as to whether or not the proposed legislation would be in conflict with the financial program of the President. In reply the director states that, in so far as the financial program of the President is concerned, there would be no objection to the proposed legislation or to the recommended modification thereof, provided all expense of making the connection with the Maryland water system be borne by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. A copy of the letter of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget dated April 4, 1930, is inclosed herewith. Very sincerely,

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,
PROCTOR L. DOUGHERTY, President.

APRIL 4, 1930. Hon. PROCTOR L. DOUGHERTY, President Board of Commissioners District of Columbia,

Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. DouGHERTY; I have your letter of March 25, 1930, transmitting pursuant to the provisions of Bureau of the Budget Circulars No. 49 and No. 273, H. R. 9408, a bill to amend the act of March 3, 1917, an act making appropriations for the general expenses of the District of Columbia. The act of March 3, 1917, authorized the Commissioners of the District of Columbia to supply water to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission at four designated points. The purpose of the proposed bill is to add a fifth point at Forty-ninth and Chesapeake Streets NW. You propose in your report to recommend this fifth point at Forty-seventh and Fessenden Streets NW.

You are advised that, in so far as the financial program of the President is concerned, there would be no objection to the proposed legislation, or to your recommended modification thereof, provided all expenses of making the connection with the Maryland water system be borne by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. Very truly yours,

J. CLAWSON ROOP, Director.

[ocr errors]
« ÎnapoiContinuați »