Imagini ale paginilor
PDF
ePub

This bill would extend for one and three years, respectively, from February 20, 1930, the times for commencing and completing the construction of the bridge across the Ohio River at or near Sistersville, Tyler County, W. Va., authorized by act of Congress approved February 20, 1928, to be built by the Sistersville Ohio River Bridge Co., its successors and assigns. An extension of the times for commencing and completing the construction of this bridge already has been granted once by Congress by act approved March 2, 1929.

The legislature of West Virginia passed an act (ch. 8) at its 1929 session creating a State Bridge Commission for the purpose of acquiring or building bridges across navigable rivers lying wholly or partly within the State or forming the State boundary line. This commission and the law under which it is to function has been upheld by a decision of the State Supreme Court of West Virginia. Bridges acquired or constructed by the commission are to be operated as State toll bridges until the proceeds of the tolls, in addition to meeting necessary maintenance, repair, and operation costs, shall be sufficient to pay off the bonds, including interest, issued for the purpose of acquiring or constructing such bridges. On April 22, 1930, this commission passed a resolution petitioning the Congress of the United States to not grant to private interests, or individuals, franchises for the construction of toll bridges proposed to be located within or partly within the State, or to not grant further extensions of franchises already granted upon which no actual construction has been begun. Copies of this resolution have been furnished for the files of this department and a copy is being inclosed herewith for the information of the committee. Apparently the construction of the bridge heretofore authorized at Sistersville has not been commenced, since the pending bill proposes to extend the time both for commencement and completion of the construction.

When the original bill to authorize the construction of the bridge across the Ohio River at Sistersville by the Sistersville Ohio River Bridge Co., was pending in Congress, this department submitted to your committee and to the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce adverse reports thereon. It still is the view of the department that a private toll bridge should not be built at this place. It, therefore, recommends against granting the extension of time for commencing and completing the construction of the bridge proposed by the pending bill. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary. O

}

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

{

REPORT No. 1098

PIER AND WHARF AT SOUTHERLY END OF PORT

JEFFERSON HARBOR, N. Y.

JUNE 25, 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. COPELAND, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 11729)

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill H. R. 11729) to legalize a pier and wharf at the southerly end of Port Jefferson Harbor, N. Y., having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Department of War, as will appear by the annexed House Report No. 1364, which is made a part of this report.

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11729) to legalize a pier and wharf at the southerly end of Port Jefferson Harbor, N. Y., having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

The bill has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the letter attached.

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 23, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (H. R. 11729, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) to legalize a pier and wharf at the southerly end of Port Jefferson Harbor, N. Y.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War. O

}

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

REPORT No. 1099

PAYMENT OF CERTAIN CHARGES ON GOODS SHIPPED

TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

JUNE 25, 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. BINGHAM, from the Committee on Territories and Insular

Affairs, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 6127]

The Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6127) to authorize the payment of checking and arrastre charges on consignments of goods shipped to the Philippine Islands, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass, with the following amendment:

On page 2, in line 11, after the word "services” irsert a comma and the following language: "shall not include any charges for ship-side deliveries that may hereafter be made except when services in connection therewith may be requested by the department or bureau concerned.

The following letter from the Assistant Secretary of War stresses the importance of expediting action on the bill for the reason that the nonpayment of the amounts due from the Army and Navy are inflicting a hardship upon those to whom they are due:

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 12, 1930. Hon. Hiram BINGHAM, Chairman Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: H. R. 6127, entitled "A bill to authorize the payment of checking charges and arrastre charges on consignments of goods shipped to the Philippine Islands” passed the House on April 21, 1930, and it is understood that this bill is now before the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs.

The facts in regard to the purposes of the act are shown in the hearings before & subcommittee of the Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments in the House of Representatives on February 28, 1930, and in Report No. 857, Seventy-first Congress, second session, March 7, 1930, to accompany H. R. 6127.

The amounts involved from the Army and Navy are long overdue and nonpayment is working a hardship on those to whom they are due. Payment is only equitable. It is recommended that any practicable steps be taken to expedite favorable action on bill. If any further information is needed, I shall take pleasure in supplying it. Sincerely yours,

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War. In 1922 the Philippine Legislature, acting within its authority, passed an act to create a harbor board for the port of Manila and provided for the collection of certain charges in connection with imports and exports through the port. These charges include checking charges and arrastre charges. The Manila Harbor board, representing the Philippine government, was authorized to and did contract with a commercial agency, to wit, the Manila Terminal Co., for the operation of the insular-owned piers, warehouses, and other terminal facilities and for the collection of said charges. The arrastre charge became due when a ship discharged its cargo upon a pier and the goods were taken possession of by the Manila Terminal Co. and listed by it as to articles and condition on arrival and stored in the warehouses ready for delivery to the consignee. Checking charges arose when cargo was discharged ship side directly to the consignee's boat or lighter. Here again the Manila Terminal Co. would list the articles discharged and certify their condition. This was necessary in order to complete the statistics regarding the business of the harbor, to insure the collection of the customs charges, and for the protection of the consignee in case of dispute as to the condition in which the goods arrived.

The act of the Philippine Legislature having been called to the attention of the Comptroller General, he promptly held that it was inoperative as to shipments made by the United States Government, although the matter had been previously passed upon by the Quartermaster General of the United States Army, the Judge Advocate General of the War Department, and the Secretary of War himself, all of whom held that the services rendered were necessary, and that the charges in connection therewith were proper and should be paid. The Manila Harbor Board, considering the fact that its agent, the Terminal Co., had to expend money in hiring laborers to handle the Government's shipments from commercial vessels, decided, in view of the Comptroller General's decision, to refuse to land or handle any more goods. As that would have impeded the operation of the United States Government there, the Governor General directed that the services be continued pending negotiations for a final determination of the matter. Hence, Congress was appealed to for relief.

The amount of these charges checked from 1922 up to November 6, 1929, was as follows: For the United States Navy for checking charges, $574.03, and for arrastre charges, $25,135.13; making a total of $25,709.16. For the United States Army, for checking charges, $927.95, and nothing for arrastre charges. The total of all charges unpaid until November 6, 1929, for both Army and Navy, is $26,637.11. The bill authorizes the payment of these past charges as well as future charges.

« ÎnapoiContinuați »