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SENATE

71ST CONGRESS

2d Session

REPORT No. 1090

BRANCH HOME OF THE NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED VOLUN. TEER SOLDIERS IN ONE OF THE NORTHWEST PACIFIC STATES

JUNE 25, 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. McMASTER, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9638]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 9638), to establish a branch home of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in one of the Northwest Pacific States, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The merits of the bill are set forth in the House report thereon, which is made a part of this report and reads as follows:

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9638) to establish a branch home of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at or near Roseburg, Oreg., introduced by Mr. Hawley, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass with the following amendments:

Line 5, strike out "purchase, condemnation, or otherwise," and insert in lieu thereof "donation".

Line 6, strike out “at or near Roseburg, Oregon” and insert in lieu thereof “located in one of the Northwest Pacific States'

Line 12, after the word “of” strike out the "S" and insert in lieu thereof “not to exceed $2,000,000”.

Amend the title so as to read:

“To establish a branch home of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in one of the Northwest Pacific States."

The National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers consists of the National Military Home near Dayton, Ohio, and 10 branches located as follows:

Pacific Branch, Soldiers' Home, near Santa Monica, Calif.
Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Hot Springs, S. Dak.
Western Branch, National Military Home, near Leavenworth, Kans.
Northwestern Branch, National Home, near Milwaukee, Wis.
Danville Branch, National Home, Danville, Ill.
Marion Branch, National Military Home, near Marion, Ind.
National Military Home, near Dayton, Ohio.
Mountain Branch, National Sanitarium, near Johnson City, Tenn.
Bath Branch, near Bath, N. Y.

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Eastern Branch, National Soldiers' Home, near Augusta, Me.
Southern Branch, National Soldiers' Home, near Hampton, Va.

By reference to a map on which are indicated the locations of these soldiers' homes, it will be noted that in all the district from Los Angeles, Calif., to the Canadian line and from the Pacific to the eastern edge of Wyoming and Montana, there is no national soldiers' home.

General Wood in commenting on the establishment of a home in this area has stated:

The Board of Managers, two or three years ago, after studying the increasing curve of membership in the home, came to the conclusion that after extending the facilities at present homes as far as practicable, several additional homes would be required, and one of them was to be located in the Pacific Northwest. This was the recommendation made by the board at the September, 1928, meeting, and, of course, a home in either Oregon or Washington would meet this recommendation of the beard. The board is of the opinion that a branch home to be economically managed should have a capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 men and not 500, as suggested in your letter. Our smallest home to-day is the Eastern Branch at Togus, Me., where we have facilities for many more than come there, but our other homes, with the exception of the small one at Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Hot Springs, S. Dak., have a capacity of from 1,500 to 3,500 men. If I were planning a home in the Pacific Northwest with the heavily growing population you have and the demand as we see it for soldiers' homes in the next 10 or 15 years, I would plan for at least 1,500 men. This would include a hospital, with capacity of, say, 250 to 300 beds, for we find that in the neighborhood of 25 per cent of our population will be in and out of the hospital, and barracks, with capacity of 1,200 men; say four barracks, the type of those recently built in California, each with a capacity of 300 men; in addition to this a headquarters building, a general mess, quartermaster's storehouse, a central power plant, for we have found it more economical and much more safe, as far as fire hazard is concerned, to have a central power station; in most of the homes we have connected with the boiler-house generating machines, with which electric power and light is generated.

This will give you a fair idea of what the board feels any new home established should have. It is hard to estimate the cost, but I should say between $2,000,000 and $2,500,000 would about fill the bill.

During the last winter we have turned away over 1,500 men from Sawtelle in southern California. Additional barracks are now being constructed which will take care of part of the demand, but when three years have passed, the time it would take to get authorization for construction, appropriation, and construction completed, you will find the demand on the Pacific coast will require the facilities as set forth in this letter. Very sincerely,

GEORGE H. WOOD,

President Board of Managers,

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. General Hines, the Director of the United States Veterans' Bureau, was also asked for his views on this subject, and he has written as follows:

This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of April 25, 1930, concerning the bill introduced by you for the establishment of a National Soldiers' Home at Roseburg, Oreg.

The bureau upon considering the location of the existing National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, believes that a branch thereof located in the Northwest would best serve the States of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. It develops that the military population of these three States during the World War was approximately 3 per cent of the total for the entire country. The 11 branches of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers on March 31, 1930, had 21,216 members actually present. Accordingly, if there is applied to the present membership the percentage of World War veterans furnished by the abovementioned States, there would result an estimated load of approximately 630 cases from the area in which you are interested. The potential future membership of the same section, based upon the expected increased load of the Soldiers' Homes, according to their own estimates for the entire country, would in 1936 total over 900 cases, and in 1941 approximately, 1,350. Your interest in this matter is appreciated. Very truly yours,

FRANK T. Hines, Director.

Gen. George H. Wood, president of the Board of Managers, has stated to your committee several times during the past session that it is the opinion of the board that additional branch homes should be arranged for at this time. The demand for domiciliary care of veterans is increasing each year. On January 31, 1930, there were present at the various branch homes a total of 21,595 persons. The average increase in this demand has been greater than 10 per cent per annum, but averaging the increase at 10 per cent there will be required in 1935 facilities for 34,500 persons and in 20 years it is estimated 50,000 persons will be applying for such care. As General Wood pointed out there is no duplication of Veterans' Bureau hospitalization activities in this connection. A soldiers' home is not a hospital. It is for the domiciliary care of veterans.

Your committee has amended this bill to provide for the donation of a site in one of the Northwest Pacific States. However, the author of the bill, Mr. Hawley, states that at Roseburg, Oreg., there is a State home situated on about 40 acres of good land with adjoining land that can be acquired. He advised your committee that if this legislation is adopted he has information from the leaders of both the State Senate and House of Representatives of Oregon that the State legislature will turn over this property without cost to the Government. However, your committee deemed it wise to authorize the Board of Managers to go into the subject fully and determine after full consideration just what point in that area should be selected.

A full hearing was held by your committee on the subject, and in view of the increased needs as outlined therein, it is urged that action should be taken during this Congress that will insure proper care for veterans as the need arises.

The letters of the Secretary of War and the president of the Board of Managers are as follows:

May 9, 1930. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES,

Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives. Dear MR. JAMES: With further reference to your request of February 8 for a report on H. R. 9638, Seventy-first Congress, second session, to establish a branch home of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at or near Roseburg, Oreg., there is inclosed a copy of a report from Gen. George H. Wood, president of the Board of Managers of the Home, relative to Senate bill 2368, which is identical in its terms with H. R. 9638. This report was transmitted to the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs of the Senate on March 3, 1930, with the statement that in view of the pending bill (H. R. 6141) to authorize the President to consolidate and coordinate governmental activities affecting war veterans, the department was unable to recommend the passage of S. 2368. H. R. 10630 for this purpose has passed the House. Sincerely yours,

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

NATIONAL MILITARY HOME,

Dayton, Ohio, February 27, 1930. To the SECRETARY OF WAR,

War Department, Washington, D. C. In conformity with your indorsement of February 8, letter of the Budget officer of February 21, and letter of the Director of the Budget of February 20, 1930, these papers are returned to you to be forwarded to the Senate Committee on Military Affairs with the following report:

The Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, at the September, 1928, meeting, made a very careful survey of the increasing demand for soldiers' home service and adopted the following policy:

That existing homes should be expanded as far as practicable, considering topography, etc., to a maximum capacity of 4,000 members, but they felt that with the heavily increasing demand for home service this would not meet the requirements placed upon the home under the law, and, therefore, suggested that additional homes situated at strategic places in the country should be authorized and established.

One of the homes suggested was to be located in the Pacific Northwest, as there is only one home on the Pacific coast, at Los Angeles, Calif., in the extreme Pacific Southwest, and with the heavily increasing population of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, it was felt that a home would be needed in that territory. As to Roseburg, Oreg., the site suggested, the board have no knowledge of the

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location proposed, but is of the opinion that a home in the Pacific Northwest will be needed by the time authorization, appropriation, and construction can be accomplished.

GEORGE H. WOOD,

President Board of Managers, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers.

PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT OF HOME AT ROSEBURG, OREG.

May 9, 1930. Hon. HARRY C. RANSLEY,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. RANSLEY: I was unavoidably detained from attending the hearing before the House Committee on Military Affairs to-day on the proposition of the establishment of a branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Roseburg, Oreg., but feel that a letter will probably give the committee all the information on this subject which I could have given if I had been present and testified.

Need of a home in the Pacific Northwest.--The Board of Managers at their September meeting, 1928, after carefully studying the increasing curve of population of the National Home, in their recommendations to Congress, suggested the immediate establishment of a home in the Southern States and also stated that, in their opinion, within a short time another branch home was indicated in the Pacific Northwest. The steady growth of population since that time fully confirms the estimates made by the board referring specifically to the Pacific Northwest. During the last winter, 1929–30, over 1,500 applicants were turned away from the Pacific Branch at Sawtelle, Calif., as there were no beds available in either hospital or barracks at that branch for their accommodation. Fortunately, in June of this year we opened four additional barracks at the Pacific Branch with a capacity of 1,400 beds, but these will be absorbed immediately as more than that number were turned away during the last winter and this means that in the winter of 1930-31 we will have no beds available on the Pacific coast.

Under these circumstances it would appear that an additional branch of the national home in the Pacific Northwest, i. e., Washington, Oregon, or Idaho, is needed and can be utilized as soon as it is ready for occupancy. A curve covering estimated population in the home continued to the year 1935 would show a population of over 35,000 in the various branches of the home, and this winter's peak load of nearly 22,000 completely exhausted our facilities at all branches, with the exception of the Eastern Branch, at Togus, Me., therefore additional construction is strongly indicated and it is my opinion that a home in the Pacific Northwest would be very strategically located.

Home at Roseburg, Oreg.-I have no knowledge whatsoever of the situation at Roseburg, Oreg., to-day. Therefore I am not in a position to recommend or disapprove location of a branch of the national home at Roseburg. Of course, it would be necessary to have a tract of 250 to 300 acres, because the Board of Managers are of the opinion that it is to the best interests of the Government to establish branch homes with a minimum capacity of 2,000, which can be increased with demand to a population of 4,000, and this number we feel is a maximum that can be efficiently and economically administered. As far as Roseburg is concerned, the question of acreage and what buildings are there now would have to be very carefully studied, and I do not feel that I would be in position to pass personally on the Roseburg proposition without a personal investigation.

Therefore I feel that as far as the legislation proposed of the location of a branch of the national home in the Pacific Northwest is concerned, that the facts warrant such action. As to a specific location at Roseburg, I have not full information to warrant my forming an opinion. Very sincerely,

GEORGE H. WOOD,

President Board of Managers, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers.

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BRIDGE ACROSS THE OHIO RIVER AT SISTERSVILLE,

W. VA.

JUNE 25, 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Dale, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4665)

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4665) extending the times for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the Ohio River at Sistersville, Tyler County, W. Va., have considered the same and report thereon with an amendment, and as so amended recommend that the bill do pass.

Amend the bill as follows:

Line 8, after the word “Virginia' insert the following: "heretofore extended by an act of Congress approved March 2, 1929,".

Line 8, after the word "hereby insert the word “further".

The bill thus amended has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the annexed communication; the amendment referred to therein having been incorporated in the bill as reported.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, June 13, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Commerce, United States Senate.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (S. 4665, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) extending the times for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the Ohio River at Sistersville, Tyler County, W. Va., if amended as indicated in red thereon.

F. TRUBEE Davison,

Acting Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., June 18, 1930. Hon. HIRAM W. JOHNSON,

Chairman Committee on Commerce, United States Senate.

DEAR Senator: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of June 10, transmitting a copy of a bill (S. 4665) with request that the committee be furnished with such suggestions touching its merits and the propriety of its passage as the department might deem appropriate.

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