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devices affected by this bill is juvenile gambling with the following accompaniments: (1) Stealing money from home to play the machines; (2) diverting money for grocery purchases and pretending that it was lost; (3) going hungry at school and using the luncheon allowance to play the machines; (4) joining boy gangs of robbers to get money for gambling; (5) snatching purses for the same purpose.

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Mr. Borah, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, submitted

the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. J. Res. 253]

The Committee on Foreign Relations, having had under consideration H. J. Res. 253, to provide for the expenses of a delegation of the United States to the sixth meeting of the Congress of Military Medicine and Pharmacy to be held at Budapest in 1931, reports the same with the following amendment:

After the word "Budapest" in line 9, insert the following: “or such other place as may be determined upon."

As amended, the committee recommends that the resolution do pass.

House Report No. 903 is attached hereto and made a part of this report.

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred House Joint Resolution 253, to provide for the expenses of a delegation of the United States to the sixth meeting of the Congress of Military Medicine and Pharmacy to be held at Budapest in 1931, having had the same under consideration, reports thereon with the recommendation that the resolution do pass without amendment.

The passage of this resolution is recommended by the President in his message to Congress of December 13, 1929, as follows: To the Congress of the United States:

I commend to the favorable consideration of the Congress the inclosed report from the Secretary of State, to the end that legislation may be enacted to authorize an appropriation of such sum, not exceeding $10,000 for any one meeting, as may by the President be considered necessary for the expenses of participation by the United States in International Congresses of Military Medicine and Pharmacy.

HERBERT HOOVER. THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 13, 1929.
SR-71-2-VOL 270

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 12, 1929. The PRESIDENT:

At the request of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the Navy, I have the honor to recommend that the Congress be asked to enact legislation authorizing the appropriation of such sum, not exceeding $10,000 for any one meeting as may by the President be considered necessary, for the expenses of participation by the United States in International Congresses of Military Medicine and Pharmacy.

There is inclosed a memorandum from the Secretary of War setting forth the reasons why official participation by the United States in these congresses is considered desirable. Communications from the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Navy, drawn up in similar phraseology, indicate their concurrence in the proposal." As a matter of convenience, a tentative draft of the desired legislation is inclosed herewith. Respectfully submitted.

H. L. STIMSON.

MEMORANDUM CONCERNING A JOINT RESOLUTION TO ENABLE THE PRESIDENT TO

APPOINT DELEGATES TO REPRESENT THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESSES OF MILITARY MEDICINE AND PHARMACY, AND TO PAY THE EXPENSES OF SUCH DELEGATES

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 10, 1929. The Association of Military Surgeons of the United States was organized in 1891 for the patriotic purpose of keeping alive a knowledge of military medicine, a special branch of medical science, which, in time of peace, is quickly forgotten. In 1903 the Congress of the United States gave it a charter, and in recognition of its national importance provided an advisory board for it composed of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Surgeons General of the medical services connected with these three departments. Since that time it has acquired a certain international status, as invitations to attend its annual meetings have been sent out annually through the State Department to the nations having diplomatic representatives at Washington to send representatives to the annual meetings of the association. Many distinguished medical officers of other nations have attended these annual meetings and have shared their knowledge and experience with our own medical officers.

In 1921 the King of the Belgians, recognizing the importance to humanity of preserving and standardizing the dearly bought experiences of the World War as regards the rescuing of the wounded in battle and the preserving of the armed forces from disease, called an International Congress of Military Medicine and Pharmacy, which met at Brussels in July, 1921. Twenty countries sent official representatives to this Congress, and its results were so valuable that other meetings have been held as follows:

The second international congress was held at Rome in 1923. Twenty-nine countries were officially represented.

The third international congress was held at Paris in 1925. Forty countries were officially represented.

The fourth international congress was held at Warsaw in 1927. Thirty-one countries were officially represented.

The fifth international congress was held at London in 1929. Thirty-nine countries were officially represented.

The sixth international congress will be held at Budapest in 1931.

At the first three of these congresses the United States had no official representation, but for the congresses at Warsaw and at London the President asked the authority of Congress to send official delegates and to make an appropriation to cover their expenses. Unfortunately legislative delays have prevented such an appropriation both in 1927 and 1929. It is believed that the humane and beneficent purposes of these congresses should be supported by the United States and that it should participate officially in them without such participation being dependent on the private initiative and generosity of individuals.

The Association of Military Surgeons is earnestly desirous that Congress should authorize proper representation of our country at these congresses so as to show our interest in the subjects considered, which are of great importance to humanity and to the efficiency of the military service, and also to enable the association to keep abreast with the advances in military medicine and the prevention of epidemic diseases.

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Mr. Fess, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 2643)

It is recommended that the bill pass.

By this bill it is sought to amend the law establishing the George Rogers Clark Sesquicentennial Commission in three particulars:

First, it would increase the authorization from $1,000,000 to $1,750,000.

Second, it would direct payment of expenditures upon approval by the commission, instead of requiring approval by a majority of the members of the commission.

Third, it would prolong the life of the commission to June 30, 1935.

The amount authorized by this bill is the amount unanimously approved by the Senate when the commission was first created. The House, however, reduced the amount to $1,000,000.

Since the legislation was passed the commission has proceeded in good faith to carry out the wishes of Congress as expressed in the legislation. The commission consists of 15 members: 3 members appointed by the President of the United States, 3 Members of the Senate appointed by the President of the Senate, 3 Members of the House appointed by the Speaker of the House, and 6 members appointed by the George Rogers Clark Memorial Commission of Îndiana. The commission first employed Mr. William E. Parsons, of the architectural firm of Bennett, Parsons & Frost, of Chicago. Mr. Parsons is an architect of recognized ability and judgment. He has done much work for the Government and his work has given uniform satisfaction.

Mr. Parsons was employed to serve as architect for the grounds and as architectural advisor in the carrying on of the competition for the selection of the architect to erect the memorial. Mr. Parsons made an exhaustive study of the grounds, its history, its environment and successfully executed the program of competition.

This competition resulted in bringing together more than 50 of the outstanding architects of America, who submitted designs for the memorial. The successful competitor was Mr. F. C. Hirons, of the architectural firm of Hirons & Mellor, of the city of New York. Mr. Hirons is recognized as one of the ablest architects of the age, but nothing need further be said of his qualifications than the statement that he was awarded the construction of this memorial over more than 50 of the ablest architects in this country Both Mr. Parsons and Mr. Hirons have given the commission the benefit of their great talents as well as years of experience in such undertakings. It is also to be noted that from the designs submitted by the other architects there was almost a unanimity of thought upon the treatment and requirements of this undertaking. It should also be remarked that their thought was supported by another great architect, H. Vanburen MacGonigle, who had prepared a sketch showing his suggestions for the treatment of this effort for the benefit of Congress two years ago. It was on his report that the Senate fixed the amount, and subsequent investigations have vindicated its judgment.

These three architects are agreed that the story to be told, the character of the site, the topography of the surrounding country, as well as the historic structures on the site associated with it in historical importance, their size and character, all determine the scale and require a structure of such size and character as to portray the event and blend into one harmonious whole. It is necessary if the Government is to adequately and worthily express its appreciation, if it is to reflect here its own greatness and gratitude, that it should rise to meet the opportunity presented by this most unusual and fortunate setting of beautiful architectural associations, of a beautiful natural environment interwoven in beauty, romance, and history. The amount required to adequately do this could not be determined in advance by legislative action, but was arrived at after study and investigations on the ground by the best talent to be had.

There is upon the site the old French St. Xavier Cathedral, itself possessing remarkable architectural charm and there is not far from the site the Harrison mansion, the home of William Henry Harrison, Governor of the Indiana Territory, Governor of the old Northwest Territory, and at one time Governor of the Louisiana Purchase. This Harrison house is connected with the site of the memorial by a broad boulevard now under construction and there is at the site of the memorial a memorial bridge now being built across the Wabash, connecting the States of Indiana and Illinois. This bridge is at the point crossed by Abraham Lincoln in his journey to Illinois, his future home. Not only this historic old mansion and church, but other fixed conditions present the problem to the Government whether or not a monument should be erected which would lend itself in harmony with this environment or whether or not simply a monument should be erected for a certain sum regardless of the results sought to be accomplished

Monuments can not be erected upon specified sites to commemorate certain events and completed for a definite sum as a commercial structure can. A commercial structure can be erected for any desired amount, but the cost of a suitable memorial can be determined only by considering other necessary elements. Especially is this true for the memorial to be erected upon this site and to commemorate this event.

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