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Farm Loan Board thereunder. The bill would authorize the institution of suits by the board's receivers to enforce assessments made after the enactment of the bill by the Federal Farm Loan Board, at any time within three years after such assessments are made, so as to establish a Federal statute of limitations with respect to such litigation in order to remove the uncertainties arising out of conflicting and varying State statutes of limitations. The bill further provides for the ratification and confirmation by the Congress of all of the steps taken by the Federal Farm Loan Board and its receivers in the administration of the affairs of the banks heretofore placed in the hands of receivers, as fully to all intents and purposes as if the powers and authority vested by this act in the Federal Farm Loan Board and its receivers had by prior act of the Congress been specifically included in the Federal farm loan act. The bill would also incorporate in the Federal farm loan act an express declaration that the authority of a receiver of a bank includes the liquidation of collateral deposited with farm loan registrars as security for farm-loan bonds. The foregoing amendments would be added to section 29 of the Federal farm loan act. In addition, the bill would insert in the Federal farm loan act a further clause to be designated "k" in section 17 of the present act, following clause "j" thereof, expressly authorizing the Federal Farm Loan Board to prescribe all needful rules and regulations for the enforcement of the provisions of the act, together with certain incidental provisions which are set out in this connection in the bill.

Because of the holding of the Supreme Court of the United States in the specific question before it in the case of Wheeler, petitioner, v. Greene, with respect to the enforcement of statutory liability of stockholders, and because of questions that have been raised as to the interpretation of the Federal farm loan act in other respects as to the powers of the Federal Farm Loan Board in receiverships, it is advisable to clarify the situation promptly by the enactment of legislation declaring the existence in the Federal Farm Loan Board of all the necessary powers. It is believed that this would simply be carrying out the intent of the Congress in the enactment of the original act, and that the enactment of this bill should result in clearing up many of the questions that have arisen, thereby facilitating the administration of the banks in receivership. Such action should not only be of immediate benefit to the security holders of these banks but would be a step in the directiou of the restoration of confidence on the part of the public in the banks of the system.

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SENATE

718T CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 917

TO MAKE PERMANENT THE ADDITIONAL OFFICE OF DISTRICT JUDGE CREATED FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS BY THE ACT OF SEPTEMBER 14, 1922

JUNE 16, 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. STEIWER, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 3064)

The Committee on the Judiciary, having considered the bill S. 3064, reports the same favorably with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The eastern district of Illinois is about 300 miles long. Its area is over 22,000 square miles. It contains 45 counties. In St. Clair, parts of Williamson, Franklin, and Vermilion Counties there are congested industrial centers not exceeded except in the great cities. Judge Lindley assumed office as district judge of the eastern district of Illinois in June, 1922. In the 10 years ending June 30, 1924, there were terminated in the eastern district of Illinois 3,942 criminal cases as compared with 2,075 in Indiana, 1,602 in the eastern district of Wisconsin, 2,740 in the western district of Wisconsin, 3,754 in the eastern district of Missouri (including St. Louis), 3,236 in the southern district of Illinois, and 6,171 in the northern district of Illinois (including Chicago). In the same period there were more contested trials in the eastern district of Illinois than in any other district of the seventh circuit; the figures, taken from the Attorney General's report, being: Eastern district of Illinois..

688 Northern district of Illinois (Chicago)

428 Southern district of Illinois..

309 Eastern district of Wisconsin.

194 Western district of Wisconsin.

175 District of Indiana..

146 Eastern district of Missouri (St. Louis)

312

Total number of trials in various districts during years 1913 to 1927, inclusive Eastern district of Illinois.

1, 019 Northern district of Illinois.

827 Eastern district of Missouri (St. Louis)

479 Southern district of Illinois.

413 Eastern district of Wisconsin

416 Western district of Wisconsin.

209 District of Indiana..

259 The eastern district of Illinois has one permanent judge and one judge whose office expires upon the promotion, death, or resignation of the incumbent. The purpose and effect of this bill is to make permanent the judgeship which is now temporary. Under the present status the death or resignation of Judge Lindley would leave the eastern district of Illinois with only one judge. The rapid increase in business in that district makes it perfectly clear that one judge would be utterly unable to handle the judicial work of the district. Without question one other judge would have to be provided. The only thing to be considered is whether the second judge should be provided for in advance by this bill or whether the status should remain unchanged so that the removal of Judge Lindley would result immediately in inadequate personnel and consequent congestion in the court. The committee believes it wiser to deal with this situation in advance. The bill does not increase governmental expense. It simply provides in advance for a contingency that the committee believes is certain to happen. For this reason the bill is reported favorably.

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SENATE

718T CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 921

COMMEMORATION OF CAMP BLOUNT AND PRESERVATION OF

OLD STONE BRIDGE, LINCOLN COUNTY, TENN.

JUNE 16, 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. McKELLAR, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7924)

The Committee on the Library, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 7924) for the erection of tablets or markers and the commemoration of Camp Blount, having considered the same, recommends that it do pass.

House Report No. 1226 is hereto attached and made a part of this report.

The Committee on the Library, to which was referred H. R. 7924 for the erection of tablets or markers and the commemoration of Camp Blount and the old stone bridge, Lincoln County, Tenn., unanimously recommends its passage, with the following amendment:

Insert the words “ or gift” after the word "purchase" in line 8, page 2.

There are few spots possessing as varied an historic interest as Camp Blount, Lincoln County, Tenn.

The site of Camp Blount was originally an Indian camp. Camp Blount was the place of mobilization of the armies of General Andrew Jackson which conquered the Creek Nation, the Spaniards and British at Pensacola. It was the place of mobilization of the troops with which General Jackson won his great victory at New Orleans; and was also the place of mobilization of our troops who fought the first and second Seminole Indian wars. It was likewise the place of demobilization of most of those armies. Later Camp Blount was utilized by various military organizations during the Civil War, and was occupied by the army of Gen. W. T. Sherman in October, 1863.

Camp Blount is located just south of Fayetteville, Tenn., across the historic old stone bridge over Elk River, a half mile from the public square of Favetteville. It faces directly on the Jackson Highway, a great national highway named for General Jackson, which extends from Michigan, through Ohio, Kentucky, Nashville, Fayetteville, and Camp Blount, via Muscle Shoals to New Orleans.

As stated, the site of Camp Blount was once an Indian camp, probably of the Shawnees, those red Ishmaelites, who were finally driven from middle Tennessee by the Cherokees and Chickasaws about the beginning of the eighteenth century.

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