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JUNE 9 (calendar day, JUNE 10), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Dale, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4655)

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The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4655) granting the consent of Congress to the Niagara Frontier Bridge Commission, its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a toll bridge across the east branch of the Niagara River at or near the city of Tonawanda, N. Y., having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Departments of War and Agriculture, as will appear by the annexed House Report No. 1480, which is made a part of this report.

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(House Report No. 1480, Seventy-first Congress, second session) The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11933) granting the consent of Congress to the construction of a bridge across the east branch of the Niagara River, having considered and amended the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

Amend the bill as follows:
Line 6, after the figures “1929,” strike out the word "and".
Line 7, after the words “operate a” insert the word “toll”.
Page 2, after line 10, insert the following as a new section:

“Sec. 3. If tolls are charged for the use of such bridge, the rates of toll shall be so adjusted as to provide a fund sufficient to pay the reasonable cost of maintaining, repairing, and operating the bridge and its approaches under economical management, and to provide a sinking fund sufficient to amortize the cost of the bridge and its approaches, including reasonable interest and financing cost, as soon as possible under reasonable charges, but within a period of not to exceed twenty years from the completion thereof. After a sinking fund sufficient for such amortization shall have been so provided, such bridge shall thereafter be maintained and operated free of tolls, or the rates of toll shall thereafter be so adjusted as to provide a fund of not to exceed the amount necessary for the proper maintenance, repair, and operation of the bridge and its approaches under economical management. An accurate record of the costs of the bridge and its approaches, the expenditures for maintaining, repairing, and operating the same, and of the daily tolls collected, shall be kept and shall be available for the information of all persons interested.”

Page 2, line 11, strike out “Sec. 3” and insert “SEC. 4" in lieu thereof.
Amend the title so as to read:

“A bill granting the consent of Congress to the Niagara Frontier Bridge Commission, its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a toll bridge across the east branch of the Niagara River at or near the city of Tonawa N. Y."

The bill has the approval of the War and Agriculture Departments, as will appear by the letters attached.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D, C., May 2, 1930. Hon. James S. PARKER, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. PARKER: Careful consideration has been given to the bill, H. R. 11933, transmitted with your letter of April 26 with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

This bill would authorize the Niagara Frontier Bridge Commission, a State commission created by act of the Legislature of the State of New York (ch. 594, Session Laws of 1929), its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge and approaches thereto across the east branch of the Niagara River from a point about midway between the southerly city limits of the city of Tonawanda and the northerly city limits of the city of Buffalo to Grand Island, in the county of Erie, State of New York. The bill provides that the act shall be null and void unless the construction of said bridge shall be commenced within two years and completed within five years from the date of its approval. The location indicated for the proposed bridge is not on the system of Federal-aid highways approved for the State of New York.

The Niagara Frontier Bridge Commission, which would be authorized to construct the bridge, is a State agency and under the act by which it was created (ch. 594, N. Y. Sess. Laws of 1929) its purpose is to construct and maintain bridges for pedestrian and vehicular traffic across the east branch of the Niagara River from the town of Tonawanda to Grand Island and from Grand Island to Niagara Falls. The commission is authorized by the act of the State legislature to borrow money and to issue bonds for carrying out its purposes, and to derive revenues for meeting such obligations by the collection of tolls on the bridges to be constructed and operated. The act creating the commission provides also that the State of New York may by further legislative action take over the bridges and appurtenances at any time by assuming, guaranteeing, and paying all the outstanding bonds, liabilities, and other obligations of said commission, whereupon the said commission shall be deemed to be abolished. The bill is without objection so far as this department is concerned. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 30, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill, H. R. 11933, Seventy-first Congress, second session, granting the consent of Congress to the construction of a bridge across the east branch of the Niagara River.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

SENATE

71st CONGRESS)

2d Session S

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REPORT No. 883

REPRESENTATION AT THE CHICAGO CENTURY OF

PROGRESS EXPOSITION IN 1933

JUNE 9 (calendar day, June 11), 1930.--Ordered to be printed

Mr. DENEEN, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany S. J. Res. 186)

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the Senate joint resolution (S. J. Res. 186) providing for the appointment, by the President, of a committee to investigate and report on the representation at and participation in the Chicago Century of Progress Exposition, in 1933, on the part of the Government and its various departments and activities, having had the same under consideration, report it back to the Senate without amendment, and recommend that the joint resolution, which is as follows, do pass:

(S. J. Res. No. 186, Seventy-first Congress, second session) JOINT RESOLUTION Providing for an investigation and report, by a committee to be appointed by

the President, with reference to the representation at and participation in the Chicago World's Fair Centennial Celebration, known as the Century of Progress Exposition, on the part of ihe Government of the United States and its various departments and activities

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and requested to appoint a committee, consisting of one representative of each of the Departments of State, Agriculture, and Commerce, who shall investigate and report to the President, for transmission by him to the Senate and the House of Representatives at the opening of the second regular session of the present Congress, in December, 1930, their conclusions and recommendations with reference to the suitable representation at and participation in the Chicago World's Fair Centenniel Celebration, known as the Century of Progress Exposition, at Chicago, Illinois, in the year 1933, on the part of the Government of the United States and its various departments and activities.

On February 5, 1929, President Coolidge approved a joint resolution of Congress authorizing the President to invite the participation of other nations in the Chicago World's Fair Centennial Celebration, to be held at the city of Chicago in the year 1933, whenever it should be shown to the satisfaction of the President that a sum of not less

SR-71-2-VOL 2-4 61

than $5,000,000 had been raised and was available for the purposes of a world's fair to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of the incorporation of Chicago as a municipality. This joint resolution provided that its passage should not be held to obligate the Government of the United States to any expense in connection with the holding of such world's fair "other than for suitable representation thereat." This provision was inserted in the resolution upon the suggestion and at the request of the representatives of the Chicago World's Fair as it was not intended or desired that the Federal Government should contribute any portion of the expense properly chargeable to the exposition itself.

In pursuance of the joint resolution, President Hoover on November 6, 1929, issued a proclamation in which he stated that it had been shown to his satisfaction that the requisite sum of $5,000,000 had been raised and made available to the corporation whose name had been changed to "A Century of Progress" and that the board of trustees had “obtained the assistance of men eminent in science and industry to aid in presenting those historic inventions and symbols which demonstrate the progress and the modern spirit underlying industry and agriculture, and in general to present exhibits showing advancement in the industrial and fine arts."

The President further expressed his belief that "the people of many nations would be pleased to unite with the people of the United States in the celebration of a century of progress and of the centennary of Chicago, itself an outstanding example of the great and rapid changes this century has produced." The President, therefore, in compliance with be joint resolution of Congress, invited “the participation of the nations in this exposition of a century of progress, to the end that there may be shown in Chicago examples of contributions made to that progress by the peoples of many nations; and in order that the achievements and inventions of the great men of the world in science, in art, in drama, and in sport as well as in industry and agriculture, may be fittingly acknowledged and acclaimed."

In response to this invitation of our Government, great interest has been shown among the nations of the world and among the States of the Union to participate in the exposition. It is clear, however, that an exposition of the world's progress during the last hundred' years in art, science, industry, agriculture, transportation, drama, sport, and other activities would not be complete without a demonstration of the contributions of our National Government and an exhibition of many articles in its possession showing the vast participation of that Government itself in all the things that have made the last century one of marvelous advancement. It is felt by the management of the Chicago exposition that the nature and extent of this representation and participation should be determined by the Federal Government itself.

In order to start this movement, the pending joint resolution was introduced. It authorizes and requests the President to appoint a committee consisting of one representative of each of the Departments of State, Agriculture, and Commerce, who shall investigate and report to the President for transmission by him to the Senate and the House of Representatives at the opening of the next regular session of Congress in December, 1930, their conclusions and recommendations with reference to the suitable representation at and participation in

the Century of Progress Exposition at Chicago on the part of the Government of the United States and its various departments and activities.

When the report of this committee is received in December, it is hoped and expected that Congress will be in position to determine what further legislạtion should be passed in order to provide opportunity for exhibits in the control of the various Government departments to be added to those of private exhibitors and of other nations, for the purpose of showing the Federal Government's participation in and relation to the progress of mankind and of the people of the United States especially during the century which has passed since Chicago was incorporated as a village with 28 inhabitants in 1837.

The Century of Progress Exposition at Chicago, as the proposed world's fair is now called, will cover an area of approximately 1,000 acres, including a lagoon of 200 acres. It is located on the shore of Lake Michigan in the heart of the city. Already included in this area are such outstanding institutions as the Chicago Art Institute, the Field Museum, the Adler Planetarium, the Shedd Aquarium, and the Soldiers' Field Stadium, all of which will be utilized for purposes of the exposition.

The plans for the selection and grouping of exhibits have been committed to the National Research Council, which for that purpose has appointed a general advisory committee of 57 members divided into three groups, consisting of the executive committee of 7 members, 34 technical and professional members who have the responsibility of preparing the programs in their respective fields, and 16 members at large who are advisors in general. Each of the 34 technical and professional members is chairman of a subcommittee, assigned to a particular subject; thus, for instance, the subcommittee on anthropology has a membership of 4, while the subcommittee on electrical engineering has a membership of 49. The total membership of the subcommittees at this time is 409. Agriculture and transportation have been placed in the foreground in the plans for exhibits. Numerous congresses and conventions, of great interest to the Federal Government, as well as to the general public, will be held during the exposition, and an elaborate program is being arranged for the exhibition of sports and games.

The physical work of the preparation of the grounds and the erection of buildings for the exposition is well under way, and it is expected that most of the buildings will be available for occupancy a half year before the opening of the fair.

It is expected that the reports of the general advisory committee and its subcommittees of the National Research Council, together with all the plans of the exposition corporation, will be submitted to the committee whose appointment is provided for in the pending resolution, and that the proposed investigation will in every way be facilitated.

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