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$378,000

A new 4-story and basement ward building to replace the present

ward building No. 5 and service annex building No. 19, together with the present bathhouse building No. 2, north wing 225 by 35

by 60 feet, 472,500 cubic feet, at 80 cents.. A new 5-story and basement diagnostic and administration building

to replace present administration building No. 1, with annex buildings No. 2 and No. 33, 60 by 105 by 72 feet, 453,600 cubic

feet, at 80 cents. A new 2-story and basement kitchen and mess building to replace

present kitchen and dining-hall building No. 3, 75 by 80 feet, 55 by

30 by 36 feet, 275,400 cubic feet, at 80 cents. Demolishing present buildings and incidentals.

362, 880

220, 320 54, 320

Estimated total...

1, 500,000

To be divided--
Veterans' Bureau, 70 per cent (Public 29).

1,050, 000 Regular Army, 30 per cent (H. R. 7755)

450, 000 5. This reconstruction work will provide bed capacity as follows: 5 wards of 36 beds (32 in open ward and 4 in quiet room)

180 3 wards of 31 beds (28 in open ward and 3 in quiet room)

93 Officers' rooms on fifth floor of north wing

25 Second and third floors of administration building (10 rooms each).

20 Capacity of present ward building No. 6 to be retained.

92 Total..--

410 or an increase of 110 beds over the present rated capacity, using aisles, porches, etc., and an increase of 216 beds actual ward capacity.

6. It is considered advisable that H. R. 7755 be approved as soon as possible so that the War Department may estimate for its share of the necessary funds, in order to comply with the wishes of Congress as indicated in the bill already approved. Otherwise the work may be delayed.

B. F. CHEATHAM,

Major General, the Quartermaster General. The reports of the War Department on H. R. 6124 and H. R. 7755, hereinbefore referred to, are as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 1, 1930. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. James: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (H. R. 6124) to provide for the reconstruction of the Army and Navy Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., transmitted with your letter of December 10, 1929, with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

The bill would authorize the expenditure of $1,800,000 for rebuilding of the Army and Navy Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., all of which would, of necessity, come from funds appropriated for the Army.

While the present installations at the Army and Navy General Hospital are sufficient to meet the needs of the Army, they are not sufficient to meet the requirements of the Veterans' Bureau. However, the existing facilities are quite old, and the installation of modern equipment in new and up-to-date buildings would greatly improve and facilitate the treatment of patients.

It is believed that an equitable distribution of the total cost of rebuilding this hospital, now estimated to be $1,500,000, would be 70 per cent to the Veterans' Bureau and 30 per cent to the War Department. In fact, legislation based upon such distribution has already been enacted. House Report No. 38, Seventyfirst Congress, first session, on H. R. 234, a bill authorizing appropriations for veteran hospitalization, contains the following statement:

“There has also been added $1,050,000 for additional beds at the United States Army Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark., this amount being 70 per cent of the total amount to be expended at that institution. Your committee felt, in view of the excellent results which have been obtained by treatment offered at this institution, that these additional facilities should be made available, particularly for World War veterans, and that 70 per cent of the cost of the additional facilities should be provided for specifically under a Veterans' Bureau authorization bill."

H. R. 234 has been enacted into law, having been approved by the President on December 23, 1929. It is now designated as Public, No. 29, Seventy-first Congress.

In view of the foregoing, it is recommended that H. R. 6124 not receive favorable consideration, but that in lieu thereof, legislation be enacted that would authorize the appropriation of a sum representing the War Department's portion of the cost (30 per cent) of the reconstruction of this hospital.

H. R. 7755, which has been referred to your committee and which authorizes an appropriation of $150,000 for the Army and Navy Hospital, appears to be designed to supplement the amount authorized for the same project in H. R. 234, thus making available the full amount required for this project. Favorable consideration of H. R. 7755 in lieu of H. R. 6124 is therefore recommended. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 4, 1930.
Hon. W. FRANK JAMES,
Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives.
DEAR MR. JAMES: Careful consideration has been given to the bill H. R.
7755, to authorize the Secretary of War to construct a hospital building at Hot
Springs, Ark., upon which the views of the War Department have been requested.

The bill would authorize and direct the Secretary of War to raze a portion of the existing hospital buildings at the Army and Navy General Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark., and construct on the site thus cleared another unit of this hospital and authorize the expenditure of $450,000 for this purpose.

While the present installations at the Army and Navy General Hospital are of sufficient capacity to meet the needs of the Army, they are not sufficient to meet the requirements of both the Army and the Veterans' Bureau. The existing hospital buildings are quite old, and are of nonfireproof construction, with brick walls, wood floors and roof framing, and slate roofs. The buildings have been kept in a fair state of preservation, but, being of an antiquated type, are unsuitable for the requirements of a modern, up-to-date hospital. The construction of new fireproof buildings and the installation of modern equipment therein would greatly improve and facilitate treatment of patients.

It is estimated that to rebuild and enlarge this hospital so as to provide suitable and adequate accommodations to meet the requirements of both the Army and the Veterans' Bureau would cost $1,500,000, and it is believed that an equitable distribution of the total cost of this project would be 70 per cent to the Veterans' Bureau and 30 per cent to the War Department. In fact, legislation based upon such distribution has already been enacted. It has been noted that House Report No. 38, Seventy-first Congress, first session, on H. R. 234 (Public 29, 71st Cong.), authorizing appropriations for veteran hospitalization, contains the following statement:

“There has also been added $1,050,000 for additional beds at the United States Army Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark., this amount being 70 per cent of the total amount to be expended at that institution. Your committee felt, in view of the excellent result which has been obtained by treatment offered at this institution, that these additional facilities should be made available, particularly for World War veterans, and that 70 per cent of the cost of the additional facilities should be provided for specifically under a Veterans' Bureau authorization bill."

The instant bill to authorize an appropriation of $450,000 would provide the War Department's 30 per cent of the total cost of this project, and would supplement the amount of $1,050,000 authorized for this same project in Public 29, Seventy-first Congress, thus making available the total amount required for the project.

In view of the foregoing, the War Department favors the passage of H. R. 7755. However, to obviate any misunderstanding as to supervision of this entire project and the future status of this hospital, it is recommended that the bill be amended by adding thereto the following section:

“Sec. 2. All funds expended for the construction or reconstruction of hospital buildings and facilities on said Army and Navy General Hospital Reservation at Hot Springs, Arkansas, authorized by this or any other act, shall be so expended under supervision of the Secretary of War, and the said hospital shall remain under the jurisdiction and control of the War Department." Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

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MAY 29 (calendar day, JUNE 6), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. REED, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9425)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9425) to authorize the Secretary of War to donate a bronze cannon to the city of Martins Ferry, Ohio, having considered the same report favorably thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

. The purpose of the bill is set forth in the House report thereon which is made a part of this report and reads as follows:

The Committee on Military Affairs to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9425) to authorize the Secretary of War to donate a bronze cannon to the city of Martins Ferry, Ohio, introduced by Mr. Murphy, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

In recent years it has been the practice to give to communities desiring them, those obsolete cannon that are available at various arsenals, in order that they may be used for commemorative purposes.

In Martins Ferry, Ohio, is located the grave of Elizabeth Zane, known in history as the heroine of Fort Henry. The Battle of Fort Henry, located at what is now Wheeling, W. Va., was the last battle of the Revolutionary War. It was after the signing of the peace treaty but before news of the event had reached what was then wilderness. General St. Clair, with a body of English troops and Indians, attacked the fort by surprise. However, the defenders of the fort held off the enemy for two days, when it was found the powder was becoming exhausted. Colonel Zane, the commanding officer, remembered a keg of powder that had been left in his cabin, which was about 150 yards from the fort. He called for volunteers. Betty Zane, a resident of Philadelphia, who had just graduated from a girls' school, was visiting her uncle, Colonel Zane. She insisted on going for the powder because of the scarcity of men and her belief that a girl could succeed where a man would fail. She reached the hut in safety and started back with an apron full of powder before the Indians realized her purpose. However, she escaped the fire of the Indians, and the new supply of powder enabled the defenders to successfully withstand the attacks of the British and Indians, who finally withdrew.

A monument has been erected by the school children of Martins Ferry, and the cemetery is now being maintained by the city in commemoration of this brave girl.

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It is desired that the bronze cannon mentioned in this bill be placed in that cemetery. The donation meets with the approval of the War Department, as set forth in the following letter:

FEBRUARY 24, 1930. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. JAMES: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (H. R. 9425) to authorize the Secretary of War to donate a bronze cannon to the city of Martins Ferry, Ohio, which was transmitted to the War Department under date of February 3, 1930, with a request for information and the views of the department relative thereto.

No law exists at present which authorizes the donation of this cannon.

Previous acts of Congress have authorized the Secretary of War, in his discretion, to deliver to certain named schools, colleges, academies, Grand Army posts, parks, cemeteries, cities, and towns, one or more brass or bronze cannon with carriages and cannon balls, the property to be subject at all times to the order of the Secretary of War (37 Stat. 508; 38 Stat. 1198; and 39 Stat. 831).

The cannon in question is now located at Watervliet Arsenal, Watervliet, N. Y., and, although it is among those already authorized for distribution under the above laws which were enacted more than 10 years ago, its delivery has not as yet been requested.

In view of the above, no objection is foreseen on the part of the War Department to the passage of the proposed bill. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY, Secretary of War.

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