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the sum of (1) the actual cost of constructing such bridge and its approaches, less a reasonable deduction for actual depreciation in value; (2) the actual cost of acquiring such interests in real property; (3) actual financing and promotion costs not to exceed 10 per centum of the sum of the cost of constructing the bridge and its approaches and acquiring such interests in real property; and (4) actual expenditures for necessary improvements.

Sec. 5. If such bridge shall at any time be taken over or acquired by the States or public agencies or political subdivisions thereof, or by either of them, as provided in section 4 of this act, and if tolls are thereafter charged for the use thereof, the rates of toll shall be so adjusted as to provide a fund sufficient to pay for the reasonable cost of maintaining, repairing, and operating the bridge and its approaches under economical management, and to provide a sinking fund sufficient to amortize the amount paid therefor, including reasonable interest and financing cost, as soon as possible under reasonable charges but within a period of not to exceed ten years from the date of acquiring the same. After a sinking fund sufficient for such amortization shall have been so provided, such bridge shall thereafter be maintained and operated free of tolls, or the rates of toll shall thereafter be so adjusted as to provide a fund of not to exceed the amount necesa sary for the proper maintenance, repair, and operation of the bridge and its approaches under economical management. An accurate record of the amount paid for acquiring the bridge and its approaches, the actual expenditures for maintaining, repairing, and operating the same and of the daily tolls collected, shall be kept and shall be available for the information of all persons interested.

Sec. 6. The said Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall within ninety days after the completion of such bridge file with the Secretary of War and with the highway departments of the States of Iowa and Missouri a sworn itemized statement showing the actual original cost of constructing the bridge and its approaches, the actual cost of acquiring any interest in real property necessary therefor, and the actual financing and promotion costs. The Secretary of War may, and upon request of the highway department of either of such States shal?, at any time within three years after the completion of such bridge, investigate such costs and determine the accuracy and the reasonableness of the costs alleged in the statement of costs so filed, and shall make a finding of the actual and reasonable costs of constructing, financing, and promoting such bridge; for the purpose of such investigation the said Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall make available all of their records in connection with the construction, financing, and promotion thereof. The findings of the Secretary of War as to the reasonable costs of the construction, financing, and promotion of the bridge shall be conclusive for the purposes mentioned in section 4 of this act, subject only to review in a court of equity for fraud or gross mistake.

Sec. 7. The right to sell, assign, transfer, and mortgage all the rights, powers, and privileges conferred by this act is hereby granted to Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, and any corporation to which or any person to whom such rights, powers, and privileges may be sold, assigned, or transferred, or who shall acquire the same by mortgage foreclosure or otherwise, is hereby authorized and empowered to exercise the same as fully as though conferred herein directly upon such corporation or person.

SEC. 8. The right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved. Approved May 22, 1928.

(Public— No. 1003—70TH CONGRESS)

(H. R. 17127] AN ACT To extend the times for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the

Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the times for commencing and completing the construction of the bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa, authorized to be built by Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, by the act of Congress approved May 22, 1928, are hereby extended one and three years, respectively, from May 22, 1929.

ŠEC. 2. The right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved. Approved March 2, 1929.

Hon. W. F. Kopp, who introduced this bill, has submitted the following information with respect thereto:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C., April 14, 1930. Hon. JAMES S. PARKER,

Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. MY DEAR COLLEAGUE: Your inquiry in regard to H. R. 11273 has been received, . and in answer thereto will say as follows:

Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, were authorized by the act of Congress approved May 22, 1928, known as Public Act No. 470 of the Seventieth Congress, to build a bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa. The time for commencing the construction of the bridge was extended to May 22, 1930, by act of Congress approved March 2, 1929, known as Public Act No. 1003 of the Seventieth Congress.

At the time this extension was granted it was believed that the necessary financial arrangements could be made in ample time to begin the construction of the bridge before May 22, 1930. It now appears, however, that this will be impossible and therefore a further extension of one year is requested and that is the purpose of H. R. 11273.

Croton is a small village and on both sides of the river are farming districts. These people are not in a position to provide the money for construction of the bridge. Hence, the money must be raised from nonresidents. I am assured that a capable engineer has been retained; that plans have been drawn and that the negotiations for financing the construction of the bridge are proceeding with every promise of success.

It is believed that the project would have been financed ere this and that a further extension would have been unnecessary if there had been no financial depression during the past year.

Under the circumstances, I therefore urgently request hat another extension be granted. Very sincerely,

W. F. KOPP. O

Calendar No. 870
}

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

{

REPORT No. 860

RECONSTRUCTION OF ARMY AND NAVY HOSPITAL, HOT

SPRINGS, ARK.

May 29 (calendar day, JUNE 6), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. REED, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6124]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 6124) to provide for the reconstruction of the Army and Navy Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The House report, setting forth the purpose and merits of the bill, is made a part of this report, and reads as follows:

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 6124) to provide for the reconstruction of the Army and Navy Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., introduced by Mr. Glover, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass with the following amendment:

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert the following in lieu thereof: “That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to aze such part of the existing hospital buildings in the reservation of the Army and Navy General Hospital, at Hot Springs, Arkansas, as may be desirable and proper to make room for the construction of another hospital, and thereafter to construct upon said ground such additional unit of said Army and Navy General Hospital, at Hot Springs, Arkansas, and for said purpose there is hereby authorized to be appropriated the sum of $450,000 out of any money in the Treasury pot otherwise appropriated.

“Sec. 2. All funds expended for the construction or reconstruction of hospital buildings and facilities on said Army and Navy General Hospital Reservation at Hot Springs, Arkansas, authorized by this or any other act, shall be so expended under supervision of the Secretary of War, and the said hospital shall remain under the jurisdiction and control of the War Department.”

It will be observed that a bill, H. R. 6124, was introduced by Representative Glover, of Arkansas, on December 3, 1929, and that a report on that bill was made by the Secretary of War under date of March 1, 1930; furthermore, that a bill was introduced by Representative McSwain, of South Carolina, H. R. 7755, on December 18, 1929, and the report thereon was made by the Secretary of War under date of April 4, 1930, and that both letters from the War Department are printed in connection with this report.

It is believed that the language of H. R. 7755 is preferable not only because it limits the present authorization to $450,000, but also because it leaves discretion to the Secretary of War to determine what part or parts of the existing hospital buildings in the reservation of the Army and Navy General Hospital at Hot Springs shall be razed to make room for the construction of another and additional unit of said hospital.

We have gone into the matter of the necessity and desirability of increasing and modernizing the hospital facilities at Hot Springs with great care, and after hearings on the bills. There appeared before the committee on December 19, 1929, Col. Robert U. Patterson, who is and has been for several years in command of said hospital at Hot Springs, and from him we derived valuable information as to the therapeutic value of the water and of the treatments employed in connection with the water available at Hot Springs.

Furthermore, we had the testimony of Brig. Gen. L. H. Bash, Assistant Quartermaster General of the United States Army, as to the condition of the present buildings and as to the nature and extent of the building proposed to be built.

We find that the buildings now employed for the wards and clinics of the hospital are very old and inadequate and out of date. While the walls are of brick, the interior frame work is all of wood, the floors are wooden, and the beams and joists and rafters are of wood, as well as the framework of all the partitions. The building is, therefore, in no sense fireproof and may be kept in a sanitary condition only with the greatest effort and expense.

Furthermore, the porches, steps, and stairways are all of wood and highly inflammable. In addition, the capacity of the hospital is now limited to 300 patients, and that only by crowding beds and cots in the passageways and upon the outside porches.

We are informed that there is constantly a long waiting list of former soldiers seeking hospitalization through the United States Veterans' Bureau. The regional office of the United States Veterans' Bureau at Little Rock, Ark., is the clearing house for all applicants for hospitalization at Hot Springs, and we are informed that the waiting list of those recommended by the central office for all the other regional offices ranges anywhere from 65 up, and is sometimes as high as 150.

Undoubtedly the baths supplied from the hot springs are of great value in the treatment of rheumatism in all its forms, and also in the treatment of neuralgia, neuritis, metallic poisoning, certain heart conditions, and certain urological conditions.

The cases of former soldiers needing the specific treatments made available at this hospital at Hot Springs come from all quarters of the United States. They can obtain treatments at Hot Springs that are not obtainable elsewhere. Undoubtedly the naturally hot waters have a certain curative value for certain discases, especially when employed in connection with appropriate medical and surgical treatments. For these reasons, therefore, it is highly appropriate that a portion of the expense of constructing an enlarged and modern hospital should be contributed by funds from the Veterans' Bureau appropriation.

For this purpose the act of Congress which was passed and approved in December, 1929, being H. R. 234 (Public, No. 29, 71st Cong., 1st sess.), made provisions for the appropriation of $1,050,000 by way of a 70 per cent contribution of the total amount of $1,500,000 to be expended for modernizing and enlarging the Army and Navy General Hospital at Hot Springs. This ratio of 70 per cent by the United States Veterans' Bureau and 30 per cent by the War Department is based upon statistics for the last five years showing that the average of patients in said hospital is made up of 70 per cent United States Veterans' Bureau patients and 30 per cent War Department and Navy Department patients.

After having considered most carefully the need and desirability of a modern fireproof hospital at this place, we went very carefully into the item of cost. During the months that this matter has been under consideration the Quartermaster General of the United States Arn has had drawings made of the foundation and floor plans of the proposed new hospital building and blue prints of these drawings are now in the possession of the committee and will be exhibited to the Congress.

Furthermore, a careful calculation based upon the size of the building, the nature of the material to be used in construction, the knowledge of the cost of material in that locality, and the knowledge of the cost of labor, both skilled and unskilled, available in that section of the country was made by the Quartermaster General, and we append as a part of this report that calculation. The hearings themselves have been printed and are available to those desiring to make a more detailed study of the project.

(Second indorsement]

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 31, 1929. The QUARTERMASTER GENERAL OF THE ARMY:

1. The last bill passed by Congress to provide additional hospital facilities for World War veterans and carrying the sum of $14,000,000, approved by the President just before Christmas, provided $1,050,000 for additional beds at the United States Army hospital, Hot Springs, Ark. This is 70 per cent of the amount estimated it would take to construct a 400-bed hospital at that station to replace the present old hospital. The bill in question, H. R. 7755, for $450,000, is the 30 per cent it was thought the Army ought to provide for rebuilding this hospital. "The special wording of the House bill is due to the fact that the hospital will have to be constructed in two installments so as not to close the hospital to Veterans' Bureau patients during the process of construction.

2. I recommend that a favorable reply be returned to the chairman of the House Military Committee on H. R. 7755.

M. W. IRELAND, Major General, the Surgeon General (Third Indorsement)

JANUARY 7, 1930 THE ADJUTANT GENERAL:

1. The bill referred to by the Surgeon General is H. R. 234, Seventy-first Congress, second session (Public No. 29, approved December 23, 1929), and covers $15,950,000.

2. Report No. 38, to accompany H. R. 234, submitted by the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation, recommended an increase of $1,050,000 for additional beds at the United States Army Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark., this amount being 70 per cent of the total estimated cost of $1,500,000. Based on the number of patients treated at this hospital, it was considered that the War Department, from military appropriations, should provide $450,000, or 30 per cent of the estimated cost of reconstruction. H. R. 7755 has been presented by Mr. McSwain to cover this latter amount.

3. The rated bed capacity of the present Army and Navy General Hospital, using aisles, porches, etc., is 300, of which 175 beds are assigned to the Veterans' Bureau, which is not sufficient to care for all veterans, as the proportion of the total number of patients has been increased to the extent that it is now, Army 30 per cent, and Veterans' Bureau 70 per cent. The distribution of the beds is as follows:

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4. The present hospital buildings are of nonfireproof construction, with brick walls, wood floors and roof framing, and slate roofs. While they have been kept in a fair state of preservation, they are of an antiquated type and unsuitable for the requirements of a modern, up-to-date hospital. The estimated cost of $1,500,000 for reconstruction contemplates the removal of all present buildings comprising the hospital group, with the exception of the present 3-story and basement ward building No. 6, and the construction of — A new 5-story and basement ward building No. 4, and service annex

building No. 18, east wing, 240 by 35 by 72 feet, 604,000 cubic feet, at 80 cents...

$483, 840 SR-71-2-VOL 2- -58

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