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The land which it is now contemplated to purchase is substantially that which was originally in contemplation for purchase.

The acquisition of the tracts in question is essential to the future development of this important post, as the land already possessed is not sufficient and in certain cases not suitable for the training of a Cavalry command of the size and importance of that at Fort Bliss. The lands desired are the most desirable in the vicinity for close-order training, reviews, and other ceremonies, and their close proximity to the post is of advantage in close-order training.

They also contain an area most suitable for training in Cavalry field exercises and problems, which is, in fact, the only available land in the vicinity of Fort Bliss for this purpose. The price of these lands is not likely to be reduced, but, on the other hand, may increase with the growth of the city of El Paso. It should also be noted that if this land is acquired at the figure mentioned in the proposed legislation, the total cost of the land proposed to be purchased and that which was purchased in 1925 would amount to but $6,305.70 more than the sum of $366,000 originally appropriated in 1925.

In view of the foregoing, the War Department is in favor of the passage of the proposed legislation. Sincerely yours,

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War. O

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SENATE

71ST CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 854

BRIDGE ACROSS THE MONONGAHELA RIVER AT STAR

CITY, W. VA.

May 29 (calendar day, JUNE 6), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Dale, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4453]

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4453) authorizing the Mononga hela Bridge Co. to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Monongahela River at or near the town of Star City, W. Va., having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the annexed communication.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 17, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Commerce, United States Senate.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (S. 4453, 71st Čong., 2d sess.) authorizing the Monongahela Bridge Čo. to construct a bridge across the Monongahela River at or near the town of Star City, W. Va.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., May 20, 1930. Hon. Hiram W. JOANSON, Chairman Committee on Commerce,

United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of May 14, transmitting & copy of a bill (S. 4453) with request that the committee be furnished with such suggestions touching its merits and the propriety of its passage as the department might deem appropriate.

This bill would authorize the Monongahela Bridge Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a toll bridge and approaches thereto across the Monongahela River at or near the town of Star City, W. Va. The location indicated for the proposed bridge is not directly on the West Virginia system of Federal-aid highways, but would constitute a lateral connection therewith.

The State of West Virginia has established a State bridge commission for the purpose of acquiring existing toll bridges, or constructing new toll bridges, and operating them so as to free them to public use as early as possible. Since the State has made a definite move toward the acquisition of existing private toll bridges, it is the judgment of this department that any further permits issued to private corporations to erect toll bridges in West Virginia should have the concurrence of the State through its State bridge commission, and in the absence of such concurrence the department recommends against favorable consideration of this bill. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

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May 29 (calendar day, JUNE 6), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Dale, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 11273]

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (II. R. 11273) to extend the times for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa, having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Department of War, as will appear by the annexed House of Representatives Report No. 1175, which is made a part of this report.

(House Report No. 1175, Seventy-first Congress, second session) The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11273) to extend the time for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

The bill has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the letter attached.

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 9, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill, H. R. 11273, Seventy-first Congress, second session, to extend the times for commencing and completing the construction of a bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., April 9, 1930. Hon. James S. PARKER, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives. Dear Mr. PARKER: Careful consideration has been given to the bill H. R. 11273, transmitted with your letter of April 2 with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

This bill would extend for one and three years, respectively, from May 22, 1930, the times for commencing and completing the construction of the bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa, authorized by act of Congress approved May 22, 1928, and heretofore 'extended by act of Congress approved March 2, 1929, to be built by Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns. When the original bill to authorize the construction of this bridge and the bill extending the times for commencing and completing such construction were pending before your committee, this department made adverse reports thereon. It still is the view of the department that a private toll bridge should not be built at this point. It therefore recommends against favorable action on the bill. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

The acts of Congress referred to in the bill are as follows:

[Public-No. 470_70th CONGRESS]

(S. 4357) An ACT Authorizing Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in order to facilitate interstate commerce, improve the postal service, and provide for military and other purposes, Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, be, and are hereby, authorized to construct, maintain and operate a bridge and approaches thereto across the Des Moines River, at a point suitable to the interests of navigation, at or near Croton, Iowa, in accordance with the provisions of the act entitled “An act to regulate the construction of bridges over navigable waters," approved March 23, 1906, and subject to the conditions and limitations contained in this act.

Sec. 2. There is hereby conferred upon Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Frank Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, all such rights and powers to enter upon lands and to acquire, condemn, occupy, possess, and use real estate and other property needed for the location, construction, operation, and maintenance of such bridge and its approaches as are possessed by railroad corporations for railroad purposes or by bridge corporations for bridge purposes in the State in which such real estate or other property is situated, upon making just compensation therefor, to be ascertained and paid according to the laws of such State, and the proceedings therefor shall be the same as in the condemnation or expropriation of property for public purposes in such State.

Sec. 3. The said Henry Horsey, Winfield Scott, A. L. Ballegoin, and Henry Schee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, are hereby authorized to fix and charge tolls for transit over such bridge, and the rates of toll so fixed shall be the legal rates until changed by the Secretary of War under the authority contained in the act of March 23, 1906.

Sec. 4. After the completion of such bridge, as determined by the Secretary of War, either the State of Iowa, the State of Missouri, any public agency or political subdivision of either of such States, within or adjoining which any part of such bridge is located, or any two or more of them jointly, may at any time acquire and take over all right, title, and interest in such bridge and its approaches, and any interest in real property necessary therefor, by purchase or by condemnation, or expropriation, in accordance with the laws of either of such States governing the acquisition of private property for public purposes by condemnation or expropriation. If at any time after the expiration of 10 years after the completion of such bridge, the same is acquired by condemnation or expropriation, the amount of damages or compensation to be allowed shall not include good will, going value, or prospective revenues or profits, but shall be limited to

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