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718T CONGRESS

2d Session

SENATE

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REPORT No. 602

ADDITION OF CERTAIN LANDS TO THE FREMONT

NATIONAL FOREST, OREG.

APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 5), 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. McNaRy, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 3717)

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 3717) to add certain lands to the Fremont National Forest in the State of Oregon, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The facts are set forth in the report of the House Committee on the Public Lands (H. Rept. No. 1050, 71st Cong., 2d sess.), which is appended hereto and made a part of this report, as follows:

(House Report No. 1050, Seventy-first Congress, second session] The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred H. R. 3717, to add certain lands to the Fremont National Forest in the State of Oregon, having considered the same, recommend that it do pass without amendment.

The letters appearing below fully explain the necessity and purpose of this legislation.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, February 17, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on Public Lands,

House of Representatives. My Dear MR. CHAIRMAN: In response to your request of January 28 for an opinion as to the merits of H. R. 3717, there is transmitted herewith a memorandum submitted by the Commissioner of the General Land Office. After a review of the situation I am in agreement with Commissioner Moore in his favorable report upon the bill. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, February 6, 1930. Memorandum for the Secretary.

I have by departmental reference the request of the chairman of the Committee on the Public Lands of the House for report on H. R. 3717.

SR-71-2-VOL 220

The bill proposes to add the public lands within the therein-described area in Oregon to the Fremont National Forest, subject to valid existing claims or entries, and to extend the provisions of the forest exchange law of March 20, 1922 (42 Stat. 465), over the other lands within such area.

The described area exclusive of the lands therein now within national forest boundaries, contains 194,264 acres, of which 98,420 acres are shown by the records of this office to be in public ownership. A small portion of the land in public ownership is embraced in unperfected homestead entries which would be protected under the reservation proposed.

In accordance with the provisions of section 8 of the act of June 7, 1924 (43 Stat. 653), the National Forest Reservation Commission has recommended inclusion of the public lands involved in the forest.

C. C. MOORE, Commissioner.

MARCH 4, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. COLTON: Reference is made to your letter of January 28, inclosing copy of H. R. 3717, a bill to add certain lands to the Fremont National Forest in the State of Oregon, and asking for the views of this department thereon:

The proposed legislation would give a national forest status to all lands of the United States within certain described areas in the State of Oregon, said lands to be added to the Fremont National Forest.

The lands described by the bill have hitherto been considered by the National Forest Reservation Commission which, by resolution adopted February 13, 1928, recommended that they be given a national forest status, and the recommendation of the commission was transmitted to the Congress by the President on March 1, 1928, and is found in House Document 192, Seventieth Congress.

Briefly stated, the proposed addition comprises an area of approximately 100,000 acres which are practically surrounded or interspersed with lands now under national forest administration. Thev lie at an elevation of from 5,000 to 7,000 feet. The topography is what may be termed “rolling.” The soil over nearly the entire unit is pumice in character, varying from 144 to 444 feet in depth, with a subsoil of sandy loam. This pumice is very light and porous and has very little agricultural value. The forest cover is made up of yellow pine and lodgepole. The aggregate amount of commercial timber is estimated at 130,000,000 feet. Throughout the yellow pine type of timber reproduction is well distributed and healthy. As to the lodgepole type, the reproduction on the lower slopes and near the watercourses is well developed and in good stands; but on the lower levels, while it is widely distributed, the growth has been slow, due to the porous nature of the soils, together with climatic conditions. The unit is an exceptionally severe fire risk, perhaps one of the worst in south central Oregon. Practically all of the public lands are valuable for forestry purposes; that is, the growing of timber and watershed protection. None of the lands are cultivated but they are quite extensively used during the summer months for grazing and because of lack of management are being overgrazed.

The description of the area recommended by the National Forest Reservation Commission has been very much simplified in H. R. 3717. This is quite desirable, since the possibilities of error are very great where descriptions are in detail by small legal subdivisions.

The lands are so located with respect to adjoining national forests that they can be administered without additional appropriation, and the incidental increase in the cost of administering the national forests to which they would be attached, it is believed, will be fully covered by the receipts from the lands.

The lands involved appear unquestionably to be of greater value for timber production than for any other purpose, and are so related to the adjoining or intermingled national forest lands that their management and administration as national forest lands obviously is desirable, in the public interest, and can be accomplished at small additional expense. The department, therefore, recommends that the bill H. R. 3717 receive the approval of Congress. Sincerely yours,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

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SENATE

715T CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 603

BRIDGE ACROSS THE OHIO RIVER AT OR NEAR

HENDERSON, KY.

APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 5), 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. DALE, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 4259)

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4259) granting the consent of Congress to the Louisville & Nashville Railway Co. to construct, maintain, and operate a railroad bridge across the Ohio River at or near Henderson, Ky., having considered the same, report favorably thereon, and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Departments of War and Agriculture, as will appear by the annexed communications, which are made a part of this report.

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 30, 1930. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Commerce, United States Senate.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of Do objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (S. 4259, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) which proposes to grant the consent of Congress to the Louisville & Nashville Railway Co. to construct a railroad bridge across the Ohio River at or near Henderson, Ky.

This bill is, however, practically identical with S. 4215, Seventy-first Congress, second session, upon which a favorable report is being submitted. It appears that the two bills contemplate the authorization of one and the same structure, and that it is not the intention of the railroad company to build two bridges over the Ohio River at this point. While this department offers no objection to the passage of either bill, the passage of both seems unnecessary.

F. TRUBEE DAVISON,

Acting Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., May 2, 1930. Hon. Hiram W. JOHNSON,

Chairman Committee on Commerce, United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of April 23 transmitting a copy of a bill (S. 4259) with the request that the committee be furnished with such suggestions touching its merits and the propriety of its passage as the department might deem appropriate.

This bill would authorize the Louisville & Nashville Railway Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a railroad bridge and approach s thereto across the Ohio River at or near Henderson, Ky. This bill relates to a railroad bridge and is without objection so far as this department is concerned. Sincerely,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

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718T CONGRESS

2d Session

SENATE

REPORT No. 604

BRIDGE ACROSS HUDSON RIVER AT STILLWATER, N. Y.

APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 5), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Dale, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 110461

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11046) to legalize a bridge across the Hudson River at Stillwater, N. Y., having considered the same, report favorably thereon and recommend that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Departments of War and Agriculture, as will appear by the annexed House of Representatives Report No. 1042, which is made a part of this report.

[House Report No. 1042, Seventy-first Congress, second session) The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11046) granting the consent of Congress to the State of New York to construct, maintain, and operate a free highway bridge across the Hudson River at or near Stillwater, N. Y., having considered and amended the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass, with amendments.

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert the following in lieu thereof:

“That the bridge now being reconstructed across the Hudson River at Stillwater, New York, by the State of New York, if completed in accordance with plans accepted by the Chief of Engineers and the Secretary of War, as providing suitable facilities for navigation, and operated as a free bridge, shall be a lawful structure, and shall be subject to the conditions and limitations of the act entitled 'An act to regulate the construction of bridges over navigable waters,' approved March 23, 1906, other than those requiring the approval of plans by the Secretary of War and the Chief of Engineers before reconstruction of the bridge is commenced.

"Sec. 2. The right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved.'

Amend the title so as to read: "A bill to legalize a bridge across the Hudson River At Stillwater, New York.” The bill has the approval of the War and Agriculture Departments, as will appear by the letters attached.

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