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APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 5), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. BRATTON, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 497)

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the bill (S. 497) to provide for the erection and operation of public bathhouses at Hot Springs, N. Mex., report favorably thereon and recommend that it do pass with the following amendments:

On page 2, line 4, after the word "hereby', insert the words "authorized to be”.

On page 2, line 6, strike out “$250,000” and insert in lieu thereof "$100,000".

The facts bearing upon the need for the facilities contemplated in the bill, the medicinal value of the hot water from the spring located on the reserve in question, and the attitude of the Secretary of the Interior, are stated in the attached correspondence.

STATE OF NEw MEXICO,
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE,

BUREAU OF PUBLIC HEALTH,

Santa Fe, February 14, 1929. Hon. Sam G. BRATTON,

United States Senaté, Washington, D. C. My Dear SENATOR: I have just returned from a visit to Hot Springs, N. Mex., where I had an opportunity to secure some first-hand information regarding the Government bathhouse there. The conditions are really worse than I had at first supposed.

It appears that there have been make-shift adobe structures put up over this spring from time to time. They are now greatly dilapidated and are exceedingly unattractive. There are three rooms containing concrete tanks. The water flows from the springs in a small stream through these tanks but there is no way whatever of draining the tanks completely and flushing them out. As a consequence, each bather must use water that has already been used by a previous bather.

I had a long talk with the man who rents towels and blankets. He tells me that there is no one responsible for the care of the bathhouse but that he does wbat he can to look after it. He says that in the summer time the wooden benches outside of the house are filled all day long with persons waiting to take a bath, and that he has seen as many as eight at one time in one of these concrete tanks. With such crowding it would not be possible to get into a position to submerge the whole body in the water. Under present conditions the bathhouse is really insanitary and ought not to be permitted to operate.

I was very greatly interested in talking to many persons who had first-hand information as to the beneficial effects of this hot spring water. The local physician and others assured me that there were many complete cures of rheumatic conditions and that a great many more persons received marked benefit. Undoubtedly, if an up-to-date, sanitary bathhouse were constructed the curative qualities of this water would be made available to many more persons. It seems to me it could be utilized very well by ex-service men who are suffering from rheumatic conditions, and might be made an adjunct to the treatment they are receiving in the nearby hospitals. Cordially,

G. S. LUCKETT, M. D., Director.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Food DRUG, AND INSECTICIDE ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D. C., January 28, 1929. Hon. S. G. BRATTON,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR SENATOR BRATTON: In compliance with your request, made by telephone to-day, there are inclosed photostats of pages 485 and 486 from the book Mineral Waters of the United States and American Spas, by W. E. Fitch. This book was published by Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia and New York.

The analysis of the water of Hot Springs, N. Mex., on page 486, was made in this department, but the statements of the therapeutic effects of the water, which appear below the analysis, were not made here and, therefore, should not be regarded as representing the opinion of the department. Very truly yours,

P. B. DUNBAR,

Assistant Chief.

HOT SPRINGS (SIERRA COUNTY) Post office: Hot Springs. Location: In the southwestern portion of the State; northeast of Fort Bayard, 60 miles; south of Albuquerque, 160 miles; north of El Paso, Tex., 165 miles. Situation: In the valley of the Rio Grande River, at an elevation of 4,200 feet above sea level; 4 miles below is the famous Elephant Butte Dam, constructed by the United States Reclamation Service, making a lake 45 miles long and 8 miles wide, with a shore line of more than 200 miles, comprising the largest artificial reservoir in the world. Access: Via Engel Station, on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway system, thence by motor 21 miles to the springs. Hotels: There are several modern hostelries, with every modern convenience. There are two modernly equipped bathing establishments, where every appurtenance has been installed for the scientific application of the latest knowledge in hydrotherapy and balneotherapy. There are seven active springs in the area, all carrying practically the same percentage of the predominating chemical constituents.

Parts per 1,000,000

(analyst, Bureau of Hypothetical combinations

Chemistry, Washington) Sodium chloride (NaCl).

1, 771. 60 Potassium chloride (KCI)

131. 40 Potassium nitrate (KNO3).

0. 80 Calcium chloride (CaCl)

WIX

143. 90 Calcium sulphate (CaSO.)

113. 00 Magnesium chloride (MgCl,)

63. 10 Calcium bicarbonate (Ca(HCO3)2)

278. 60 Ferrous bicarbonate (Fe[#CO:))

0.60 Aluminum oxide (Al2O3)

3. 20 Silica (SiO2) ---

43. 00

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Total solids
Temperature (°C).
Flow in gallons per day.

2, 549. 20

46. 7 48, 000 Medicinal classification, saline or (CI), thermic. The analysis shows a moderately highly mineralized, thermic, sodic, muriated, saline water, possessing eliminative and tonic properties. The waters have been found highly efficient in the relief of chronic joint affections, rheumatism, neuritis and chronic run-down conditions generally. This spring was formerly known as Palomas Hot Springs, and has been referred to as the America Carlsbad. The waters and hot baths given here have a reputation for speedy relief in chronic skin diseases.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, May 29, 1929. Hon. GERALD P. NYE, Chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR NYE: I have your request of April 27, 1929, for report on the merits of (S. 497) a bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to provide for the erection and operation of public bathhouses on a public reserve in block 97 of Hot Springs, N. Mex., and providing an appropriation of $250,000 for that purpose. This bíll is identical with S. 4889, Seventieth Congress, on which an adverse report was submitted.

On the plat of the town site of Hot Springs, N. Mex., accepted February 2, 1920, three tracts were delineated as “reserve" because of the hot springs thereon, the waters of which are reported to have medicinal value, said reserves being situated in blocks 95, 96, and 97.

In 1919 the State of New Mexico erected a bathhouse on the largest one of the reserves, which is in block 95, at a cost of approximately $4,000 and subsequently expended $2,500 in equipping a pumping plant on the ground. This reserve was granted to the State of New Mexico under the terms and conditions of section 16 of the act of April 25, 1928 (45 Stat. pt. 2, 28), and patent No. 1021509 issued to the State. It appears that on March 11, 1929, the State of New Mexico passed an act authorizing and directing the commissioner of public lands of the State to convey to the village of Hot Springs said reserve in block 95.

The act of March 3, 1925 (43 Stat. 1133), authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to lease tracts of lands near or adjacent to mineral, medicinal, or other springs, which are located upon unreserved public lands or public lands which have been withdrawn for the protection of such springs, to responsible persons or associations to use and occupy, for the erection of bathhouses, hotels, or other improvements for the accommodation of the public. If the Government were to enter into the same kind of business it might be considered unfair to lessees under said act of March 3, 1925.

In view of the large appropriation involved and of the act of March 3, 1925, and also of the grant of one of the reserves to the State of New Mexico, subsequently granted to the municipality, I do not favor the enactment of the bill. Very truly yours,

RAY LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

Hot SPRINGS, N. Mex., January 25, 1929. Hon. Sam BRATTON,

United States Senator, Washington, D. C. After 14 years' observation results obtained mineral water here, am convinced highly beneficial for rheumatism, kdiney, bladder, and skin diseases. Water higher in radioactivity. Town and citizens unable to furnish adequate accommodations for their successful treatment; imperative we receive outside aid either from Government or private interests.

Dr. A. C. WHITE.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, December 19, 1928. Hon. 8. G. BRATTON,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR BRATTOn: Referring further to your letter of the 15th, I an inclosing a memorandum prepared by the Commissioner of the General Land Office relative to the status of the public lands at Hot Springs, N. Mex., which may be of interest to you in connection with the bill S. 4889, which you have introduced. Very truly yours,

Roy 0. WEST, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, December 19, 1928. Memorandum for Secretary.

I have your request of December 17, 1928, with which you transmitted & copy of S. 4889 and a copy of your letter to the Hon. 8. G. Bratton, United States Senate, relative thereto.

On the plat of the town site of Hot Springs, N. Mex., accepted February 2, 1920, copy attached, three tracts were delineated as "Reserve” because of the hot springs thereon, the waters of which are reported to have medicinal value, and title thereto remained in the Government,

This plat shows four blocks were set aside for cemetery purposes, two blocks for public camp grounds, a tract for waterworks, one block and a half for school purposes, one block for public buildings, and a considerable area in the southeastern portion of the town site for park purposes.

In 1919, the State of New Mexico erected a bathhouse on the reserve in block 95, which is the largest of the reserved tracts, at a cost of approximately $4,000. Subsequently, the State expended $2,500 in equipping a pumping plant on the reserve.

May 17, 1921, the department offered the custodianship of these three reserves to the officials of the town of Hot Springs. Through its mayor, the town on August 29, 1921, made a counter offer, but no action was taken thereon.

On the recommendation of the department, the reserve in block 95 was granted to the State of New Mexico under the terms and conditions of section 10 of the act of April 25, 1928 (45 Stat. 28). Patent No. 1021509 has issued to the State.

Blocks 96 and 97 also contain reserves. However, these blocks do not contain all the hot springs in this vicinity, there being an abundance of hot mineral water available at other points in the town site.

March 22, 1927, the attention of the mayor of Hot Springs was called to the provisions of the act of March 3, 1925 (43 Stat. 1133), which authorizes the Secretary of Interior to lease such reserves to a municipality to use and occupy for the erection of bathhouses, hotels, etc., for the accommodation of the public, and it was suggested that perhaps the town might desire to lease these reserves under said act, but no action has been taken by the town to avail itself of the use of such tracts in this manner.

Applications by private individuals to lease these reserves under said act of March 3, 1925, have been rejected and closed because of the adverse reports of the chief of field division, Santa Fe, N. Mex., thereon.

March 23, 1928, in reporting on the unsatisfactory condition of the springs on these reserves in Hot Springs, the chief of field division, who had discussed the matter thoroughly with the citizens of the town, recommended that the reserves in blocks 96 and 97 be granted to the town by an act of Congress, providing springs producing the hot water be made available for drinking purposes or for bathing by the public, or both. He reported that the officials of the town are willing to undertake the responsibility of administering the reserves in blocks 96 and 97 and contemplated the removal of the dilapidated and unsightly leathhouse over the spring in block 97, and the erection of a substantial and artistic drinking fountain, in order to make the hot mineral water available for drinking purposes and in connection with the fountain to develop the reserves as a resting place or park. He states that the town authorities also plan to locate an artistic building to be used as a community house and offices by them if such grant to the town is made. He also states the reserve in block 96 could be used for the erection of a swimming pool or bath house.

He further stated:

“As far as I know, the Federal Government has not taken any interest in the development of these reserves; that is, no appropriations have been made and none considered, and probably the matter is not of sufficient magnitude and importance to warrant the Government in assuming the responsibility."

WILLIAM SPRY, Commissioner. O

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