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SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION,

Washington, January 10, 1980. Hon. HENRY W. KEYES, Chairman Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR SENATOR KEYES: At the last meeting of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution of which the Chief Justice, the Vice President, Senators Smoot, Robinson, and Swanson, and Congressmen Albert Johnson, Walton Moore, and Robert Luce, with six private citizens, are members-a motion was passed to instruct the executive committee to present to the Building Committee of the Congress the desire of the Institution to be included in the proposed building program.

The executive committee, after further discussion and study of the subject, determined that the most urgent project was the enlargement of the National Museum by the building, as has long been intended, of two wings which will add about 80 per cent to its capacity. It is probably known to you that this museum, built by appropriation of Congress and administered under instructions of Congress by the Smithsonian Institution, contains collections made by expeditions and explorations to distant lands and seas, and gifts of rare and beautiful objects given by individuals.

The building is already seriously overcrowded, so much so that we are unable to accept and adequately exhibit many important objects, and there are also inadequate work rooms and laboratories for study and investigation, for the preparation and labeling of specimens, and for the immensely valuable study collections used continually in important scientific researches both by the museum staff and by workers from the Department of Agriculture, and other Government departments.

The estimate for the completion of the two wings, shown in the general plan herewith submitted, is $6,500,000, if built in harmony with the plan of the present building. Respectfully submitted.

FREDERIC A. DELANO. O

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SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 571

PAVE ROAD AT HOSPITAL NO. 90, MUSKOGEE, OKLA.

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 29), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Thomas of Oklahoma, from the Committee on Finance, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9325)

The Committee on Finance, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9325) to authorize the United States Veterans' Bureau to pave a certain road adjacent to United States Veterans’ Bureau Hospital No. 90, at Muskogee, Okla., having had the same under consideration, report it back to the Senate and recommend that the bill do pass. Following is a copy of the House report:

(House Report No. 734, Seventy-first Congress, second session] The Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9325) which authorizes the expenditure of $4,950 of the funds appropriated for hospital purposes for the purpose of paving the road running north and south immediately east of and adjacent to Hospital No. 90, at Muskogee, Okla., and between the said hospital and the Government cottages on the east side of the road, having considered the same, report thereon and recommend

The bill has the approval of the United States Veterans' Bureau, as will appear by the letter attached and which is made a part of this report.

that it pass.

UNITED STATES VETERANS' BUREAU,

Washington, February 18, 1930. Hon. Royal C. JOHNSON, Chairman Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. JOHNSON: Further reference is made to your letter of recent date transmitting a copy of H. R. 9325, a bill to authorize the United States Veterans' Bureau to pave the road running north and south immediately east of and adjacent to Hospital No. 90, at Muskogee, Okla., and to authorize the use of $4,950 of funds appropriated for hospital purposes, and for other purposes, requesting a report thereon.

This bill proposes to authorize the United States Veterans' Bureau to pave the road running north and south immediately east of and adjacent to Hospital No. 90, at Muskogee, Okla., and between the said hospital and the Government cottages on the east side of the road, and to use for said purposes $4,950 of the funds for the construction of hospital facilities. This is a public road and is open to and used by the public generally. In view of the material benefit to the hospital which would result from the resurfacing of this road, I have heretofore advised Congressman W. W. Hastings that I would favor the enactment of a special bill authorizing the use of the appropriations of the bureau for the construction work incident thereto.

The committee is therefore advised that I recommend the favorable consideration of this legislation. A copy of this letter is inclosed for your use. Very truly yours,

FRANK T. HINEs, Director. O

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71st CONGRESS

2d Session

SENATE

REPORT No. 573

COLLECTION OF POSTAGE ON MAIL ACCORDED DIREC

TORY SERVICE

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 29), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. ODDIE, from the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 3178]

The Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3178) to authorize the collection of additional postage on insufficiently or improperly addressed mail to which directory service is accorded, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

This measure would permit the Post Office Department to make a charge of 2 cents for each piece of mail which has been given directory service and delivered or returned to the sender. The rendering of this special service now entails an annual expenditure of approximately $2,000,000. It is believed that a small charge will not only cause those who benefit from this service to pay for it but also result in more carefully addressed mail.

The proposed legislation was recommended by the Postmaster General in his annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1929, as follows:

It has long been a practice in the Postal Service to search city directories or other similar books of reference for the purpose of correcting and completing improperly and insufficiently addressed mail with a view to effecting delivery. With the great growth of the Postal Service the volume of this type of mail is constantly increasing, due in part to the general knowledge that if a street address is not furnished the Postal Service will endeavor to supply it without charge. This is particularly true with respect to heavy advertising business concerns who use incomplete or obsolete mailing lists or fail to keep such lists corrected.

The supplying of addresses in this manner is a distinct, additional service not originally contemplated in fixing the rates of postage, entailing the expenditure of approximately $2,000,000 annually, and manifestly a reasonable charge therefor should be made. It is, therefore, recommended that legislation be enacted authorizing the department to make a charge of 2 cents for each piece of insufficiently or improperly addressed mail which has been given directory service and delivered or returned to the sender.

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