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APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 6), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. PHIPPS, from the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 3599)

The Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3599) to provide for the classification of extraordinary expenditures contributing to the deficiency of postal revenues having considered the same, report favorably thereon with amendments and recommend that, as amended, the bill do pass.

The suggested changes are as follows: On page 2, line 3, after the word “by”, insert “(1)”. On page 2, line 3, after the word "and”, insert “(2)".

As pointed out by the Postmaster General in his annual report, the department still handles a large volume of mail from which no revenue is derived. Chiefly such mail consists of letters sent free of postage by Members of Congress, by the executive departments, and establishments of the Government, and by others under the franking privilege. There are also included newspapers and periodicals mailed free in the county of publication and free matter for the blind, In other cases the postage charged does not cover the cost of the scrvice. This is true in the air-mail service and where vessels of American registry carry the ocean mail at mileage rates in excess of what would have been paid at pound rates.

The purpose of this bill is to provide a method whereby the Post Office Department may be credited with an amount for postage to recompense it for handling and transporting such free or inadequately paid mail matter. Various plans for doing this have been suggested from time to time and the matter has again been urged upon Congress in view of the steadily mounting deficit in postal receipts. The bill would permit the continuation of the present simple method of mailing the various kinds of free matter, while at the same time the statement of receipts and expenditures of the department would present a more accurate picture of its finances and the results of the operations of the Postal Service. The measure has the approval of the Postmaster General, who addressed the chairman of the committee on February 21, 1930, as follows:

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 21, 1930. As you know, it is the practice of Congress to appropriate the funds necessary for the support of the Post Office Department and the Postal Service out of the postal revenues. And the annual appropriation acts uniformly carry a provision appropriating in indefinite amount so much as may be necessary to make up any deficiency of the postal revenues for this purpose. After the completion of the transactions for any fiscal year this amount is stated in one sum on the books of the Treasury Department and the General Accounting Office, respectively, simply as the "deficiency in postal revenues.”

In a technical sense this classification by the Treasury and the accounting officers is of course accurate. For any year the amount stated as the “deficiency in postal revenues" is the amount by which the expenditures for the objects and purposes specified in the annual appropriation act for that year have exceeded the postal revenues. But in a wider sense this principle of classification is misleading to a large body of the public. Among the objects for which appropriations are made in the annual bill are a number which are extraneous to the primary and essential purposes of the Postal Service. Although these extraneous items are not large, relatively, if measured against the whole amount expended under the jurisdiction of the Post Office Department, they do contribute

largely to the postal deficit. S. 3599 would simply authorize the Treasury Department and the General Accounting Office, respectively, to show such items separately in stating the amount of the annual postal deficiency.

The measure would in no wise alter the present methods of accounting either at the Treasury or at the General Accounting Office, but would authorize the inclusion of supplemental figures in the published reports of these departments, for the better information of the public.

I trust that the bill will be considered favorably.
Thanking you for your cooperation, I am
Yours sincerely,

WALTER F. BROWN.
O

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APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 7), 1930.--Ordered to be printed

Mr. SMOOT, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4169)

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4169) to add certain lands to the Zion National Park in the State of Utah, and for the purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The facts are set forth in the favorable recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, under date of April 21, 1930, as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 21, 1990. Hon. GERALD P. NYE, Chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: With further reference to your request of April 16 for a report on 8. 4169, which would add certain lands to the Zion National Park in the State of Utah, there is transmitted herewith a memorandum from the Director of the National Park Service. After a review of the proposed measure, I agree with Director Albright. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE,

Washington, April 19, 1990. Memorandum for the Secretary.

Reference is made to letter of April 16, from the chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, United States Senate, transmitting a copy of S. 4169, "A bil to add certain lands to the Zion National Park, in the State of Utah, and for other purposes," with request for report thereon. This bill proposes to add lands totaling approximately 17,900 acres to the Zion National Park, Utah. The land adjoins the southeast, south and southwest boundaries of the park.

The addition of these lands to the park is very desirable for the following reasons:

(1) To eliminate offensive landscape conditions existing at or near the present park entrance.

(2) To provide additional camping space for the accommodation of visitors to Zion Canyon, where area available for camping ground is very limited.

(3) To protect the upper section of the valley of Clear Creek, through which the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway is being constructed.

(4) To bring under park protection a number of excellent cliff ruins in the Parunuweap Canyon and to add to the park the unusually scenic upper canyon of the Parunuweap and make available additional camping ground for park visitors on the floor of the Parunuweap Valley.

(5) To bring under park control lands suitable for the grazing of deer and mountain sheep, thereby enabling the restocking of the Zion area with these native animals, which have very nearly become extinct.

For the most part the lands proposed for addition are unsurveyed areas of the public domain and are unused except for a relatively small amount of grazing for which, by reason of topography, they are not well adapted.

In view of the above, it is recommended that S. 4169 receive favorable consideration by the department and Congress.

HORACE M. ALBRIGHT, Director. O

}

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

{

REPORT No. 621

ADDITION OF CERTAIN LANDS TO BRYCE CANYON

NATIONAL PARK, UTAH

APRIL 30 (calendar day, May 7), 1930.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. Smoot, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4170)

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the bill (S, 4170) to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

This proposed legislation has the favorable recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture, as set forth in their letters of April 21 and 24, 1930, respectively, as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 21, 1930. Hon. GERALD P. NYE, Chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: With further reference to your request of April 16 for a report on S. 4170, which would provide for the addition of certain lands to the Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, there is transmitted herewith a memorandum from the Director of the National Park Service. After a review of the proposed measure, I agree with Director Albright. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

NationAL PARK SERVICE,

Washington, April 19, 1930. Memorandum for the Secretary.

Reference is made to letter of April 16, from the chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, United States Senate, transmitting a copy of S. 4170, a bill to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, and for other purposes, with request for report thereon.

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