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APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 28), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. ALLEN, from the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 3273]

The Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3273) to authorize the Postmaster General to issue additional receipts or certificates of mailing to senders of any class of mail matter and to fix the fees chargeable therefor, having considered the same, report favorably thereon, without amendment, and recommend that the bill do pass.

The proposed legislation is required because of the numerous requests for additional receipts for mail matter. This is an unusual favor extended to the sender for which he should pay a small fee. The Postmaster General favorably recommended the bill in the following letter, dated January 31, 1930:

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., January 31, 1930. Hon. LAWRENCE C. PAIPPS, Chairman Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR PHIPPs: Reference is made to the inquiry of the 27th instant from the Senate Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads asking for the Post Office Department's views on bill S. 3273, Seventy-first Congress, second session, to authorize the Postmaster General to issue additional receipts or certificates of mailing to senders of any class of mail matter and to fix the fees chargeable therefor.

This legislation was recommended by the Postmaster General in his annual report for the fiscal year 1929. It also is covered by bill H. R. 8569, Seventy-first Congress, second session, and is intended to supplement the act of February 14, 1929 (39 U. S. C. 260, H. R. 56, 70th Cong.), which authorized the issue of certificates of mailing for ordinary mail of any class.

Initial receipts are given covering registered, insured, and collect-on-delivery mail at the time of the acceptance of such mail without cost other than the fees prescribed to cover indemnity in case of loss, rifling or damage and nonreceipt of returns in the case of C. 0. D. mail, but because requests for additional receipts covering this character of mail were sufficiently numerous to attract attention, it is believed that the department would be justified in charging for the additional receipts covering this kind of mail. The original receipt establishes the liability of the department in the form of indemnity and the additional receipts are to be used merely as evidence or certificates of mailing similar to the certificates of mailing for ordinary mail of any class already provided for in the act of February 14, 1929. The receipts involved are considered as being legitimately beneficial to those who desire to receive them and are considered to be of sufficient importance to issue and to justify a small charge for their issue which is now fixed by the Postal Laws and Regulations at 1 cent for each ordinary article involved.

While rendering additional service to the public they will produce some revenue and the enactment of the bill into law is desired. Very truly yours,

WALTER F. BROWN. O

SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 551

PROMOTE AGRICULTURE BY EXPANSION OF FOREIGN

FIELD SERVICE

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 28), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. McNary, from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 2043]

the bill do pass.

The Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, to whom was referred the bill (S. 2043) to promote the agriculture of the United States by expanding in the foreign field the service now rendered by the United States Department of Agriculture in acquiring and diffusing useful information regarding agriculture, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that

During the previous Congress a similar bill passed the House, was reported favorably by this committee, and reached the Senate Calendar. The legislation has the indorsement of the Department of Agriculture, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Cooperative Milk Producers' Federation, and other leading agricultural organizations.

In commenting upon the need for the service proposed in this bill, the department has stated:

This bill provides a much-needed extension of our domestic service into foreign fields to enable the department to deal more effectively without production and marketing problems. The well-being of our agriculture is determined to a large extent by conditions world-wide in scope. The competitive situation throughout the world is constantly changing and our producers must be currently informed as to new foreign developments and future outlook if they are to make intelligent adjustments in their marketing and production programs. The real significance of the markets abroad for our surpluses, as well as foreign competition in our own markets and in foreign markets, is becoming more and more generally recognized, and the department realizes that it must have an adequate foreign service

if it is to keep producers currently informed in regard to conditions in foreign countries which materially affect their business. In fact, cooperative marketing associations, farm organizations, extension directors, and individual farmers are continually making demands upon the department for information in regard to ioreign competition and demand which with our present force we are unable to

66

meet. This bill furnished the legislation which is necessary, and, to quote the report of the committee to the Senate April 19, 1927 (Rept. No. 659, 69th Cong.):

*This bill definitely places in the Department of Agriculture the foreign agricultural service of the United States, in conformity with the spirit and letter of the organic act creating the department, and puts into permanent legislative form authority now carried in the annual appropriation bill. It clearly defines the activities of the department, extends to the foreign field the services that the department is now rendering in the United States regarding competition and demand for agricultural products, the marketing and distribution problems of cotton, tobacco, wheat, fruits, and vegetables, animal and animal products, and all other farm products, the investigation of farm management, and other phases of the agricultural industry, and the conduct of any activities in which the Department of Agriculture is now authorized or in future may be authorized to engage.”

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71st CONGRESS

2d Session

SENATE

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REPORT No. 552

EXTENDING TIME FOR CUTTING AND REMOVING TIMBER UPON CERTAIN REVESTED AND RECONVEYED LANDS IN OREGON

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 28), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. McNARY, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4057)

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4057) authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to extend the time for cutting and removing timber upon certain revested and reconveyed lands in the State of Oregon, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The bill has the favorable recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, as set forth in his letter of April 17, 1930, which also sets forth the facts concerning the proposed legislation, as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 17, 1930. Hon. GERALD P. NYE, Chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: With further reference to your request of April 10 for a report on S. 4057, which would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to extend the time for cutting and removing timber upon certain revested and reconveyed lands in the State of Oregon, there is transmitted herewith a memorandum from the Commissioner of the General Land Office. After a review of the proposed measure, I agree with Commissioner Moore. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, April 16, 1930. Memorandum for the Secretary.

Reference is had to the request of Hon. Gerald P. Nye, chairman Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, United States Senate, for a report on S. 4057, a bill authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to extend the time for cutting and

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