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SENATE

71st CONGRESS

2d Session

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REPORT No. 548

ADDITION OF CERTAIN LANDS TO YOSEMITE NATIONAL

PARK, CALIF.

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 28), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Nye, from the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 10581]

The Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, to whom was referred the ball (H. R. 10581) to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Yosemite National Park, Calif., and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The facts are fully set forth in the report of the House Committee on the Public Lands (H. Rept. No. 1052, 71st Cong., 2d sess.), which is appended hereto and made a part of this report, as follows:

[House Report No. 1052, Seventy first Congress, second session] The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10581) to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Yosemite National Park, Calif., and for other purposes, having considered the same, report it favorably to the House with the recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

The purpose and reason for this legislation is fully explained in letters from the Secretary of Agriculture

and the Secretary of the Interior. These letters are herein set out in full for the information of the House and read as follows:

MARCH 31, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. COLTON: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of March 21, inclosing copy of H. R. 10581, a bill to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Yosemite National Park, Calif., and for other purposes, and asking for a report thereon.

The proposed legislation would authorize the President, on recommendation of the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture, to add to the Yosemite National Park section 1 and the north half of section 12, T. 1 S., R. 19 E., M. D. M. It is understood this legislation is desired by the National Park Service of the Department of the Interior. The Department of Agriculture has no objection to the proposed legislation. Sincerely yours,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary. SR-71-2—VOL 2 14

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 29, 1930. Hon. Don B. Colton, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: With further reference to your request of March 21 for a report on H. R. 10581, which would provide for the addition of certain Lands to the Yosemite National Park, Calif., there is transmitted herewith a memorandum from the Director of the National Park Service. After a review of the proposed measure, I agree with Director Albright. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE,

Washington, March 26, 1930. Memorandum for the Secretary.

Reference is made to letter of March 21 from the chairman Committee on the Public Lands, House of Representatives, transmitting a copy of H. R. 10581, “A bill to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Yosemite National Park, Calif., and for other purposes,” with request for report thereon.

This bill proposes to authorize the President, upon the joint recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture, to add 960 acres of land to the Yosemite National Park, Calif. This land adjoins the western boundary of the park and is located directly east of Mather Station of the Hetch Hetchy Railroad, and is now within the Stanislaus National Forest. The area is typical foothill country, originally well timbered, but now partially cut over by the city and county of San Francisco in connection with the construction of the Hetch Hetchy and Lake Eleanor Dams in the park. No important use is being made of the area at the present time except that the Carnegie Institution of Washington, under a special permit from the Forest Service, conducts a field laboratory where experiments are being made in the transplanting and propagation of plant life from various sections of the Sierra Nevada. It is also used to some extent for grazing, but this is not an important factor.

Of the entire 960 acres, 400 acres are owned by the city and county of San Francisco. Under the terms of the Reker Act, however, these lands are to be turned over to the Government when no longer needed in connection with the construction, maintenance, and operation of the Hetch Hetchy project. They have not been so used since 1923, and, inasmuch as the available timber has been removed, it is not likely that they will be so used in the future.

If those lands are added to the park, the National Park Service would be able to control and protect the proposed road from Crane Flat in the park to the Hetch Hetchy Railroad near Mather Station, which is on the program of road construction in the park. Unless they are so added, a portion of this important road would be outside the park, making its supervision and protection by the service impossible.

În view of the above, it is recommended that H. R. 10581 receive favorable consideration by Congress.

HORACE M. ALBRIGHT, Director. O

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71ST CONGRESS

2d Session

SENATE

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REPORT No. 549

USE OF OLD BUSINESS HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING TO RELIEVE CON. GESTION IN OTHER SCHOOLS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 28), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. CAPPER, from the Committee on the District of Columbia,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4227)

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4227) to authorize the Board of Education of the District of Columbia to make certain provisions for the relief of congestion in the public schools of the District of Columbia, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with the recommendation that the

bill do pass.

The object of this bill is to permit the Board of Education to use the building now occupied by the Business High School to relieve congestion in senior high, junior high, and elementary schools in adjacent territory, following the completion of the new Roosevelt High School, which will be the successor of Business High School in Washington.

The committee knows of no objection to this bill, enactment of which is sought by the District school authorities. The report of the District Commissioners on the bill, recommending favorable action, is appended hereto, as part of the report.

COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, April 25, 1930. Hon. ARTHUR CAPPER, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. Sir: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to submit the following on Senate bill 4227, Seventy-first Congress, second session, entitled "A bill to authorize the Board of Education of the District of Columbia to make certain provisions for the relief of congestion in the public schools of the District of Columbia," which you referred to them for report as to the merits of the bill and the propriety of its passage.

This bill involves the occupation of the Business High School after the completion of the Roosevelt High School, and the legislation is desired by the Board of Education. The commissioners recommend favorable action on the bill. Very truly yours,

L. H. REICHELDERFER, President Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia.

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