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In Karlsruhe there existed a group of men familiar with similar types of investigation, and to Karlsruhe several hundred miles away and in another countrythe work was taken.

There, from 1922 to date, one model experiment after another has been carried on, two at a time and sometimes three or four, solving one problem after another in connection with the locks in the canals, the outflow channels for the pumps, and the methods of closing the great dike.

No more striking illustration could be given that in the establishment of a hydraulic laboratory the proper surroundings of laboratory facilities and experimentally trained men are of more importance than the minor advantages of closeness to the work.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF LOCATING NATIONAL HYDRAULIC LABORATORY

IN THE BUREAU OF STANDARDS? There are a number of advantages in locating the proposed national hydraulic laboratory in the National Bureau of Standards.

1. A suitable site is available, involving no additional expenditure for land. 2. Power facilities for driving the pumps and other equipment are adequate. 3. The bureau already possesses a concrete flume 6 feet wide, 7 feet deep, and 400 feet long, used for testing water-current meters, which can be made an ntegral part of the hydraulic laboratory.

4. The water supply at the bureau is adequate, because the steadiest conditions are obtained by recirculating the water.

5. The hydraulic staff would have the advantage of contact with men engaged in related lines of work, such as aerodynamics and structures.

6. The facilities for the development of instruments are excellent. Three different types of strain gauges, which were extensively used in the measurements made on the Stevenson Creek Dam and its model, were designed by members of the bureau staff. Shop facilities at the bureau are adequate.

7. The underlying idea of the proposed hydraulic laboratory is research, Furthermore, it is essentially research of a laboratory character, as distinguished from field work. For most effective development, a continuity of thought and action on the part of the staff is essential. The staff should have the advantage of the inspiration, the incentive, the suggestions that come from contact with research workers in allied fields. These conditions are found in the Bureau of Standards, and here the work of a national hydraulic laboratory can be carried out to the advantage of the Federal services and the Nation.

8. In the Bureau of Standards the laboratory would be under civilian direction and would be staffed by professional men with civilian status and permanent tenure.

9. In the Bureau of Standards the laboratory will be centrally located, accessible to the other departments and will be a service laboratory for them.

10. The bureau has had a long and successful experience in cooperating with other Government establishments and the public.

For further data on the subject matter of this bill the Members are referred to the hearings held before the Committee on Rivers and Harbors during the Seventieth and Seventy-first Congresses, and to Senate Report 718, Seventieth Congress, first session.

SR-71-2-VOL 2-8

AUTHORIZING STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO BRING SUIT

IN COURT OF CLAIMS

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 24), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Thomas of Oklahoma, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 10081)

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10081) to amend the act authorizing the attorney general of the State of California to bring suit in the Court of Claims on behalf of the Indians of California, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with a recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The facts are fully set forth in the report of the House Committee on Indian Affairs (H. Rept. No. 796, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) which is appended hereto and made a part of this report, as follows:

(House Report No. 796, Seventy-first Congress, second session/

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10081) to amend the act authorizing the attorney general of the State of California to bring suit in the Court of Claims on behalf of the Indians of California, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

By the act of May 18, 1928 (45 Stat. L. 602), the attorney general of the State of California was authorized to bring suit in the Court of Claims on behalf of the Indians of that State. The act provided that enrollments should be made within two years of approval of the act, the Secretary of the Interior being allowed another year after the closing of the rolls within which to make any revision he might see fit. At the close of this third year addition of new names might not be made. The appropriation to carry out this section of the act was contained in the act of March 4, 1929 (45 Stat. L. 1640), proved insufficient and work was therefore suspended before completion. The purpose of H. R. 10081 is to grant two additional years within which enrollment might be made. In other words, four years will be allowed for enrollment instead of two, with the additional year for revision. The Interior Department appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 contains an item of $20,000 which will be available for resumption of the work immediately upon the passage of this act.

Section 7 would then read:

“For the purpose of determining who are entitled to be enrolled as Indians of California, as provided in section 1 hereof, the Secretary of the Interior, under such rules and regulations as he may prescribe, shall cause a roll to be made of persons entitled to enrollment. Any person claiming to be entitled to enrollment may within (two] four years after the approval of this act, make an application in writing to the Secretary of the Interior for enrollment. At any time within (three] five years of the approval of this act the Secretary shall have the right to alter and revise the roll, at the expiration of which time said roll shall be closed for all purposes and thereafter no additional names shall be added thereto: Provided, That the Secretary of the Interior, under such rules and regulations as he may prescribe, shall also cause to be made, within the time specified herein, a roll of all Indians of California other than Indians that come within the provisions of section 1 of this act." The favorable statement of the Secretary of the Interior reads as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, February 18, 1930. Hon. Scott LEAVITT, Chairman Committee on Indian Affairs,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: The act of May 18, 1928 (45 Stat. 602), authorized the attorney general of the State of California to bring suit in the Court of Claims on behalf of the Indians of that State. The claims of the Indians of California are based principally on 18 unratified treaties negotiated with the several tribes and bands in 1851 and 1852.

Among other things, this act directed the Secretary of the Interior to cause a roll to be made of such Indians in the State who might be found entitled to share in any favorable judgment obtained and a second roll or census covering all other Indians residing in the State at the date of the passage of the act. Section 7, referring specifically to the rolls mentioned, provides that applicants may, within two years after the approval of the act, apply in writing to the Secretary of the Interior for enrollment and that he, at any time within three years from May 18, 1928, shall have the right to alter or revise the roll, and at the expiration of that time it should be closed for all purposes and no additional names shall thereafter be added.

To carry out the enrollment work authorized by section 7 an appropriation in the sum of $10,000 was contained in the act of March 4, 1929 (45 Stat. 1640), and soon after this money became available a force of employees began the enrollment work. By reason of the time limitation contained in the act of May 18, 1928, every effort was made to expedite the preparation of the rolls. During the latter part of the summer it became apparent that the funds appropriated would not be sufficient to carry the work along and in view of the fact that a specific appropriation had been made we were not able to allot other funds for the purpose. It was not possible to obtain an appropriation for the continuation of the work and all but one of the employees assigned to it were withdrawn about October 1, 1929. The Interior Department appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 contains an item of $20,000 which will be available immediately upon the passage of the act and we hope to resume operations just as soon as the bill becomes a law. However, it will not be possible to complete the enrollment within the time limit set by the act of May 18, 1928, and it is necessary, therefore, that we obtain an extension of time.

Census records show a California population of approximately 20,000. Over a period of approximately 10 months more than 6,000 applications filed by individuals or on behalf of whole families were received and more than 12,500 Indians enrolled. It is estimated that the total applications filed by persons claiming to be of Indian blood will cover approximately 50,000 claims and the total enrollment may be as high as 25,000. This greatly exceeds the number that was contemplated at the time the jurisdictional act was passed.

In view of the conditions existing and the urgent necessity of completing the work which has already begun, it is recommended that the legislation submitted herewith receive the early attention of your committee and the Congress. Very truly yours,

RAY LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

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SENATE

REPORT

71st CONGRESS

Ad Session

{ No.513

COMMISSION TO STUDY PROPOSALS FOR NATIONAL

SYSTEM OF EXPRESS MOTORWAYS

APRIL 21 (calendar day, APRIL 24), 1930.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. PHIPPS, from the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. J. Res. 58)

The Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, to whom was referred the resolutions (S. J. Res. 58) creating a commission to study proposals for a national system of express motorways and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably with amendments and recommend that, as amended, the resolution do pass.

Amendments proposed by the committee are as follows: On page 1, line 5, after the word "each” insert the words "of the". This is to correct an omission of the printer. On line 9 strike out the word "seven” and insert the word "eight".

On page 2, line 5, after the words Treasury Department,” insert the words “one representing the Interstate Commerce Commission,”. These changes are deemed advisable in order that the department of the Government which deals generally with interstate commerce, especially the matter of rates, shall be properly represented on the proposed commission. On line 22 strike out the word “may” and insert the word "shall”, making it mandatory for Federal officers or employees to furnish needed information upon request.

It is time for the Federal Government to recognize more adequately the Nation's transportation needs. Conservatively estimated, traffic on our highways has doubled in the past five years. Registration of motor vehicles is increasing at the rate of approximately 6 per cent each year. Since the advent of the automobile our highways have been used for industry, agriculture, and travel to an extent undreamed of in former years. The Federal Government has not fully kept pace with advancing transportation needs, although this Congress has given more substantial recognition to the problem by authorizing increased Federal aid totaling $125,000,000 annually and by voting

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