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1890.

Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Rlaine... June 19

Same to same.......

June 19

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch... June 20

|

Mr. MacNutt to Mr. Blaine.
Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine ...

98 Same to same

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch

Mr. MacNutt to Mr. Blaine. July 3

Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mac- July 25
Nutt.

Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine.

TURKEY-Continued.

Same to same....

Date.

June 25

Aug. 14
Oct. 22

Nov. 17

1889. Dec. 21

1890. Mar. 6

St. Paul's Institute at Tarsus: An iradé has been
promised for the foundation of the institute.
Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev.
Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: Moussa
Bey has been banished to Medina.
Nov. 4 Schools conducted by American missionaries at
Mejdel Shems, Ain Kunyet Banias, and Ha-
math, closed by the Turkish authorities in 1884,
have been permitted to be reopened. Incloses
copies of correspondence on the subject.
Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev.
Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 171
received. Is glad to hear of the action finally
taken by the Turkish Government in the case
of Moussa Bey.

VENEZUELA.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs... May 2

Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine...

May 3 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs... May 19

Subject.

Same to same.......

May 21 Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine... June 7

Riot at Jaffa, May 23, 1890: Incloses a copy of a
dispatch of the 26th ultimo from the United
States consul at Jerusalem, stating that on the
23d of May the Christians at Jaffa were attacked
by a Moslem mob carrying banners and armed
with sticks.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs... June 21

Robert College: An iradé has been granted for
an addition to the college building."

Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by
American missionaries: No. 131 received. Re-
quests information on certain points.
Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kan-
storoom: No. 134 received. Approves his ac-
tion.

Riots at Erzerum: Gives details with regard to
recent conflicts between the Christians and Mos.
lems at Erzerum.

Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kan-
storoom: Incloses a copy of No. 173 of the 23d
ultimo from the United States consul at Jeru-
salem, stating that the Government had made
the most ample apology, casting all the blame
upon the stupidity and ignorance of the official
and soldiers.

Political: Congress met on the 20th ultimo. Trans-
mits copies of the President's message of the
1st instant; gives a synopsis of the same.
Apr. 25 Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana:
Gives a sketch of the successive encroachments
of Great Britain on the territory of Venezuela.
Same subject: Incloses a copy of Department's
telegram of the 1st instant, instructing the
United States minister in London to use his
good offices to bring about the resumption of
diplomatic relations between Great Britain and
Venezuela.

Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana:
Incloses a copy of a note of the 20th instant
from the foreign office, covering a copy of a
protest of the Venezuelan Government against
the recent action of the governor of Demerara
in declaring the town of Barima a British colo-
nial port.

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CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE LEGATION OF VENEZUELA AT WASHINGTON.

No.

From and to whom.

1890. Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine.... Feb. 17

Same to same...

Date.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Peraza.... May 2

Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine ... May 5

Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine

Apr. 24

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Peraza... May 19

Mr. Adee to Mr. Peraza

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Subject.

Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana:
Points out the dangers threatening all the Amer-
ican states through Great Britain's forcible
seizure of Barima and the control which she has
thereby gained of the navigation of the Ori-
noco. Requests the good offices of the United
States to secure a peaceful settlement of the
question.

Same subject: Urges the importance of sending
instructions to the United States minister in
London to use his good offices in the matter,
that the questions involved may be submitted
to arbitration.

Same subject: Cabled the United States minister
in London on the 1st instant to use his good
offices with the British Government to bring
about a resumption of diplomatic relations
between Venezuela and Great Britain as a pre-
liminary step towards negotiations for the arbi-
tration of the dispute.

Same subject: Expresses his gratification at the
instructions sent to the United States minister
in London; conveys the thanks of the Presi-
dent of Venezuela.

Same subject: Lord Salisbury has informed the
United States minister in London that he
wished to consult with the colonial office be-
fore replying to his suggestions.
Same subject: Transmits two maps showing the
successive encroachments of Great Britain on
the territory of Venezuela.

Same subject: The United States minister in
London presented Señor Pulido, the special
envoy from Venezuela to Great Britain, to
Lord Salisbury on the 25th ultimo.

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CORRESPONDENCE.

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.

Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine.

No. 25.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Buenos Ayres, January 10, 1890. (Received February 20.) SIR: I have the honor to report that yesterday, in a personal interview with Minister Zeballos, I presented to him an abstract of the message of the President of the United States in relation to an extension of our merchant marine, taken by me from a London print, upon reading which the minister expressed much gratification, and said he would at once exhibit it to the President of the Republic, and that, to whatever length our Government was ready to proceed in order to strengthen the commercial ties between the two Republics, the Argentine Government would be found ready to coöperate. His manner, as well as terms, were so affirmative that I deem it proper to communicate the interview. He especially welcomed this expression from the President, because, he remarked, Argentine statesmen had for some time past felt a grave apprehension lest our disposition in reference to foreign commerce fell short of our professions in that regard. He further took occasion to remind me that, in my address on the occasion of my presentation to the President of the Republic, I had anticipated President Harrison's expressions in that behalf.

I have, etc.,

J. R. G. PITKIN.

Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine.

No. 48.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Buenos Ayres, April 19, 1890. (Received May 23.) SIR: The attention of the Department is seriously invited to the fact that grave disquiet has not only prevailed at this capital since my arrival here last October, but has grown with its cause, financial depression, until now there are sober misgivings lest early disorder may ensue. As a goodly number of persons, native or naturalized citizens of the United States and resident here, forecast the possibility of an attempt at revolution and the need of recourse to this legation for passports in order to enjoy protection from personal injury or impressment into Argentine military service. I have respectfully to ask the attention of the Department to the terms of the affidavit to the blank application furnished the legation for a passport to either class of declarants. Many persons of each class have long dwelt here, are engaged in business, have never or but infrequently visited the United States, have FR 90-1

1

rarely, if ever, sought a renewal of their passports, and have no residence save in this Republic, and no intent to return at any fixed period to discharge the duties thereto of citizenship, yet have never qualified as Argentine citizens, nor disavowed their attachment for the United States, and now want its passport. In several such instances I have felt constrained to refuse a passport because of the long lapse of time since the applicant's departure from our country, his total cessation of relations to it, and continuous omission to supply himself with a passport. But cases arise where the rule might, it appears to me, be fitly relaxed. The present passport forms came to this legation accompanied with Department circular of August 20, 1888, instructing their use "in the place of those heretofore transmitted," which (as to natives) required no oath, as the new form requires, as to domicile in the United States, place, occupation, and intent of return to reside and discharge the duties of citizenship; and which (as to naturalized citizens) required no oath, as the new form requires, as to domicile in the United States, place, and occupation, but did require of the declarant a sworn intent of return there and performance of a citizen's duties. The fact that the affidavit in the old (native) form, as to temporary residence, is so fully extended in the new (native) form, to permanence of native domicile in, statement of occupation in, and intended return to, the United States, and the fact that the affidavit in the old (naturalized) form is likewise extended to permanence of original domicile and statement of occupation, exhibits so material a difference that the recited conditions here compel me to this communication.

It is admitted in behalf of several natives of the United States, long resident here, that their intent of permanent return obviously holds steadfast, and that, while they have established necessary domiciles here during a sojourn devoted largely to promoting a development of traffic with the United States, they have confidently relied upon the old (native) blank form (as to "temporary residence") to maintain themselves, as they can not do under the new form, in a definite and uninterrupted status as United States citizens, which the new passports would import. A long, extended absence of a United States citizen in Europe might, perhaps, import less intent to return, as a rule, than such an absence in this country, whose immature conditions invite our citizens to enterprises tributary to home interests. Often these absentees here are, in effect, our temporary pickets in commerce, and responsive to North American advantage. They hold aloof from its political affairs, and stand at their posts till their ventures may release them, and are as pronounced in their attachment to the United States as if they wore its uniform. But the new blank estops them from asking for the passport of their native country, in which, despite their intent, they have neither occupation nor domicile. These cases seem to be stronger than those of naturalized citizens of the United States long absent from it, in whose intent to return might reasonably be presumed less warmth than in the intent of natives.

Should any local trouble occur against which this Government might deem it expedient to recruit a force, these folk, born in, or naturalized by, the United States, would call upon this legation for passports only to find themselves unable to make the prescribed affidavit to that end.

With this presentment, I respectfully submit an inquiry whether the new blank forms may not admit of qualification under circumstances that disclose both the good faith and the possible hazard of an applicant. I have, etc.,

J. R. G. PITKIN.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pitkin.

No. 52.]

SIR: I have received your No. 48, of the 19th ultimo, stating that, in view of the uncertain condition of affairs in the Argentine Republic, numerous applications for passports will be, in all probability, made to the legation by citizens of the United States long domiciled in that country and who are engaged in trade or other occupations. You further state that these persons have never assumed Argentine allegiance, regard themselves as American citizens, and declare it to be their intention to return at some time to the United States. You add that the blank forms of application for passports seem to exclude such

cases.

The Department is of opinion that legitimate association in business enterprises connected with commerce between the United States and the country of residence of the person claiming American citizenship, while entailing protracted and indefinite sojourn abroad, is not incompatible with an intent to return; but such intent must satisfactorily appear. The blank forms contemplate the statement of facts evidencing, of themselves, a retention of United States domicile, but where those facts do not exist, the intention to return some time must be satisfactorily established otherwise, and not be obviously negatived by the circumstances of residence abroad.

I am, etc.,

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, May 26, 1890.

JAMES G. BLAINE.

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