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To you for gold to pay my lègions,

Which you denied me: Was that done like Cassius?
Should I have answered Caius Cassius so?
When Marcus Brutus grows so covetous,
To lock such rascal counters from his friends,
Be ready, gods, with all your thunderbolts;
Dash him to pieces!

'Tis done! dread winter spreads his latest gloom, And reigns tremendous o'er the conquered year. How dead the vegetable kingdom lies!

How dumb the tuneful! Horror wide extends
His desolate domain. Behold, fond màn!

See here thy pictured life; pass some few years,
Thy flowering spring, thy summer's ardent strength,
Thy sober autumn fading into age,

And pale concluding winter comes at last,
And shuts the scène.

Ah! whither now are fled Those dreams of greatness? those unsullied hopes Of happiness? those longings after fàme? Those restless càres? those busy bustling dàys? Those gay-spent, festive nights? those veering thoughts, Lost between good and ill, that shared thy life? All now are vànished! Virtue sole survives;

Immòrtal, never-failing friend of man,

His guide to happiness on high.

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And Pharaoh said unto Joseph, Say unto thy brethren, this do ye; lade your beasts, and go get you unto the land of CaAnd take your father, and your households, and come unto me; and I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land. Now thou art commanded, this do ye: take your wagons out of the land of Egypt for your little ones, and for your wives, and bring your father, and come. Also, regard not your stuff; for the good of all the land of Egypt is yours.

Such, sir, was once the disposition of a people who now

surround your throne with reproaches and complaints. Do justice to yourself. Banish from your mind those unworthy opinions, with which some interested persons have labored to possess you. Distrust the men who tell you that the English are naturally light and inconstant; that they complain without a cause. Withdraw your confidence equally from all parties; from ministers, favorites, and relations; and let there be one moment in your life in which you have consulted your own understanding.

Exercise 10.-To Illustrate Rule 10, page 34.

A stately tree grew on the plain; its branches were covered with verdure; its boughs spread wide, and made a goodly shadow; the trunk was like a strong pillar; the roots were like crooked fangs. I returned; the verdure was nipped by the east wind; the branches were lopped away by the ax; the worm had made its way into the trùnk; the heart thereof was decayed; it moldered away, and fell to the ground.

I have seen the insects sporting in the sunshine, and darting along the streams; their wings glittered with gold and purple; their bodies shone like the green èmerald; they were more numerous than I could count; their motions were quicker than my eye could glance. I returned; they were brushed into the poòl; they were perishing with the evening breeze; the swallow had devoured them; the pike had seized them; there were none found of so great a multitude.

I have seen a man in the pride of his strength; his cheeks glowed with beauty; his limbs were full of activity; he leaped, he walked, he ran; he rejoiced in that he was more excellent than those. I returned; he lay stiff and cold on the bare ground; his feet could no longer move, nor his hands stretch themselves out; his life was departed from him, and the breath out of his nostrils. Therefore do I weep because death is in the world; the spoiler is among the works of God; all that is made must be destroyed; all that is born must die.

And the king was much moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept; and as he went, thus he said; O my son Ábsalom!—my són, my sòn Absalom!- would God I had died for thee, O Ábsalom, my sòn, my son!

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O Jerusalem, Jerusalem! thou that killest the prophets, and stonest them which are sent unto thee!—how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!

And Abraham stretched forth his hand, and took the knife to slay his son. And the angel of the Lord called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham. And he said Here am I.

Exercise 11.-To Illustrate Rule 12, page 36.

They chose their magistrate;

And such a one as he, who puts his shâll,
His popular shâll, against a graver bench
Than ever frowned in Greece !

Let any man resolve to do right now, leaving then to do as it can; and if he were to live to the age of Methuselah, he would never do wrong. But the common error is, to resolve to act right after breâkfast, or after dînner, or to-morrow môrning, or next time. But now, just now, this once, we must go on the same as ever.

The right honorable gentleman has suggested examples which I should have shunned, examples which I should have followed. I shall never follow his, and I have ever avoided it. Am I to renounce those habits now forever? And at the beck of whom?—I should rather say, of what? A 'prentice · politician.

He hath disgraced me, and hindered me of half a million; laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my na

tion, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated my enemies; and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is?

Exercise 12.-To Illustrate Rule 13, page 36.

O thōu unütterable Potentate!

Through nature's vast extent, sublimely great!
But here, on these gigantic mountains, here
Thy greatness, glōry, wisdom, strength, and spirit,
In terrible sublimity appear!

Thy awe-imposing võice is heard; we hear it!
The Almighty's fearful voice; attend! It breaks
The silence, and in solemn wärning speaks.

Now all is hushed and still as death-
How reverend is the face of this tall pile,
Whose ancient pillars rear their marble heads,
To bear aloft its arched and ponderous roof,
By its own weight made steadfast and immoveable.

It strikes an awe

And terror on my aching sight. The tombs,
And mōnumental caves of death, look cold,
And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.

O thou that rollest above, round as the shield of my fathers! Whence are thy beams, O sun! thy everlasting light? Thou comest forth in thy awful beauty; the stars hide themselves in the sky; the moon, pale and cold, sinks in the western But thou thyself movest alone; who can be a companion of thy course?

wave.

The oaks of the mountains fall; the mountains themselves decay with years; the ocean shrinks, and grows again; the

moon herself is lost in heaven; but thou art forever the same, rejoicing in the brightness of thy course.

When the world is dark with tempests, when thunder rolls, and lightning flies, thou lookest in thy beauty from the clouds, and laughest at the storm. But, to Ossian, thou lookest in vain; for he beholds thy beams no more, whether thy yellow hairs flow on the eastern clouds, or thou tremblest at the gates of the west.

But thou art, perhaps, like me for a season; thy years will have an end. Thou shalt sleep in the clouds, careless of the voice of the morning. Exult, then, O sun, in the strength of thy youth! Age is dark and unlovely; it is like the glimmering light of the moon, when it shines through broken clouds; and the mist is on the hills, the blast of the north is on the plain; the traveler shrinks in the midst of his journey.

CHAPTER V.

MODULATION.

MODULATION implies the variations of the voice that are heard in reading or speaking.

Modulation embraces a great variety of topics pertaining to the voice, which the limits of this treatise forbid that we should introduce. Therefore, such only will be considered as can be easily understood, and are absolutely necessary to give a clear exposition of the general principles of the subject. They are the following:

1. Expression.
2. Transition.

3. Personation.

4. Rhetorical Pause.

QUESTIONS. What is Modulation? What are the subjects pertaining to Modulation that are considered in this work?

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