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Edward II. Carried to Prison,

Henry VI. Conferring the Regency on Richard of York,

The Roses of Lancaster and York,

Henry VIII. Meeting Anne of Cleves,

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William III. Receiving Addresses of Welcome.

The Landing of the Jacobite Leaders in the Highlands,

Tailpiece,

Trafalgar,

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[Authorities: Green, History of the English People Guizot, Popular History of England"; Kemble, "The Saxons in England; Macrayden Alfred, the West-Saxon"; Palgrave, Rise of the English Commonwealth," "History of Normandy and England": Bagehot, "The English Constitution"; Freeman, " History of England"; Hume, "History of England"; Knight, Popular History of England"; Lingard, History of England"; Von Ranke, "History of England"; Froude, "History of England," The English in Ireland"; Gardiner, "History of England from James I."; Carlyle, Oliver Cromwell"; Macaulay, "History of England from James II."; Lecky, England in the Eighteenth Century"; Mill, History of British India"; MacMullen, "History of Canada"; Martineau, "History of England during the Peace"; McCarthy, "History of Our Own Times."]

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KMERICANS should not read the story of England as

they would that of a foreign country. Those of us who have looked into the past, approach this tale with quickened heart-beats and a livelier interest.

Our land was originally settled by Englishmen; and, much as immigration has since altered our race, the foundation remains. It is not merely our language that comes to us from England; she gave us our bodies and our brains, our laws, our hopes, and even our religion. The grim barons who wrung the "Great Charter" from their un

willing king, the mighty sea-fighters who followed Drake and Raleigh, belong as much to our past as they do to that of any sturdy Briton of to-day. So it is

not as an alien volume, but rather as an earlier chapter of our own more recent tale, that this story of England should be read.

Could we raise the curtain on Great Britain, far back in the twilight of history, we should see, instead of an island, a projecting part of the European continent, for geologists agree that the country was once attached to the mainland. It had a climate of arctic severity, to which of course its animal and vegetable life corresponded. About the only difference between the beasts of the wood and the men was that the latter understood how to walk on two legs.

The civilized nations of the ancient world knew nothing of Britain until the daring Phoenician sailors, coasting Gaul, saw in the distant horizon the whitecliffs of a strange land. The Gauls told them that because of the white color of the cliffs they had given the name of "Albion "-meaning white-to the country. The pretty title has lived through all the centuries and is still a favorite one with poets and orators.

The Phoenicians looked farther into the land of the white cliffs and found that it contained numerous rich mines of tin and lead. Tin was highly valued, and the Phoenicians soon opened a brisk trade with the people. One of their captains, Pytheas, sailed entirely around the little group of islands, in the third century B. C., and wrote a brief record of his voyage. The accounts of those remote days, however, are so vague and meagre that little dependence can be placed upon them, and we must come down to the time of the mighty Cæsar for our first definite knowledge of England.

You will remember that while Cæsar was engaged in conquering Gaul, he discovered that his opponents received great help from their kinsmen, whocrossed over from Albion to aid them in repelling the Roman invaders. This fact, added to the strange stories which he heard about the people of the islands, led Cæsar, in the year 55 B.C., to sail for Albion-which he, in imitation: of the Greeks, called Britain. He took with him two legions, or about twelve thousand men, and that was the first historical invasion of England. The time was late in summer, and the landing-place near the site of the present town of Deal.

The shaggy Britons had watched the approach of the Roman ships, and were in truth more eager for battle than the Romans themselves. The savages had flung off their clothing of skins, so they were literally "stripped for the fight," and many who were on horseback forced their animals far out into the waves, while the riders taunted the invaders, whom they were impatient to reach. Others galloped up and down the beach in their war chariots and filled the air with their defiant cries.

The Romans drawing near were awed by what they saw. They had learned from the Gauls of the frenzied devotion of the Britons to the Druidical faith..

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