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No.
XXXIV. From Mr. West.-Latin Elegy, expressing

his wishes to see Italy and Greece 71
XXXV. To his Mother.-Death of the pope.-In-

tended departure for Rome.--First and

pleasing appearance of an Italian spring 72
XXXVI. To his Mother Cathedral of Sienna.-

Viterbo.--Distant sight of Rome. The
Tiber. - Entrance into the city.-- St.
Peter's.-Introduction of the Cardinal
d'Auvergne into the conclave .

73
XXXVII. To his Mother.-Illumination of St. Peter's
on Good Friday, &c.

77
XXXVIII. To Mr. West.-Comic account of the pa-

lace of the duke of Modena at Tivoli,
The Anio.--Its cascade.-Situation of
the town.- Villas of Horace and Mæ-
cenas, and other remains of antiquity.
--Modern aqueduets.-A grand Roman
ball

78
xxxix. To Mr. West...An Aleaicode.—Ludicrous

allusion to ancient customs.-Albano
and its lake.-Castel Gondolfo.-Pro-
spect from the palace; an observation
of Mr. Walpole's on the views in that
part of Italy.-Latin inscriptions, an-
cient and modern

82
XL. To his Mother.-Road to Naples.-Beau-

tiful situation of that city.-Its bay.-
Of Baiæ, and several other antiquities.
Some account of the first discovery of
an ancient town, not known to be Her.
eulaneum

87
XLI. To his Father.-Departure from Rome

and return to Florence-No likelihood
of the conclave's rising. Some of the
cardinals dead. Description of the Pre-
tender, his sons, and court.-Procession
at Naples.-Sight of the king and queen.
Mildness of the air at Florence

89

No.

Page
XLII. From Mr. West. On his quitting the Tem-
ple, and reason for it

92
XLIII. To Mr. West.--Answer to the foregoing

letter. Some account of Naples and its
envirous, and of Mr. Walpole's and his
return to Florence

94
XLIV. To his Mother.-Excursion to Bologna.-

Election of a pope; description of his
person, with an odd speech which he
made to the cardinals in the conclave

98
XLV. To Mr. West.-Description in Latin hex-

ameters of the sudden rising of Monte
Nuovo near Puzzoli, and of the destrue-
tion which attended it

100
XLVI. To his Father.- Uncertainty of the route

he shall take in his return to England.
-Magnificence of the Italians in their
reception of strangers, and parsimony
when alone.—The great applause which
the new pope meets with.

One of his
bon mots
XLVII. To his Father.-Total want of amusement

at Florence, occasioned by the late em-
peror's funeral not being public.-A pro-
cession to avert the ill effects of a late
inundation. Intention of going to Ve-
nice.-An invasion from the Neapolitans
apprehended.-The inhabitants of Tus-
cany dissatisfied with the government

106
XLVIII.' To Mr. West.-The time of his departure

from Florence determined.--Alteration
in his temper and spirits. Difference
between an Italian fair and an English
one.--A farewell to Florence and its
prospects in Latin hexameters. -Imita-
tion, in the same language, of an Italian
sonnet

. 108
XLIX. From Mr. West.-His spirits not as yet

• 104

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No.

improved by country air.Has begun

to read Tacitus, but not to relish him 111
L. To Mr. West.- Earnest hopes for his

friend's better health, as the warm wea-
ther comes on.-Defence of Tacitus, and
his character. Of the new Dunciad.-
Sends him a speech from the first scene
of his Agrippina

112
LI. From Mr. West.-Criticisms on his friend's

tragic style.—Latin hexameters on his
own cough

114
LII. To Mr. West.Thanks for his verses.-

On Joseph Andrews.-Defence of old
words in tragedy

116
LIJI. From Mr. West.—Answer to the former,on

the subject of antiquated expressions 119
LIV. To Mr. West.-Has laid aside his tragedy.

-Difficulty of translating Tacitus 120
LV. From Mr. West.-With an English ode on
the approach of May

123
LVI. To Mr. West-Criticises his ode.-of his

own classical studies
LVII. From Mr. West.-Answer to the fore-
going

125
• 138

126
LVIII. To Mr. West. Of his own peculiar spe-

cies of melancholy.-Inscription for a
wood in Greek hexameters.--Argument
and exordium of a Latin heroic epistle
from Sophonisba to Massinissa

127
LIX. To Dr. Wharton, on taking his degree of

Bachelor of Civil Law
LX. To Dr. Wharton.-Ridicule on university

laziness. Of Dr. Akenside's Poem on
the Pleasures of Imagination .

132
LXI. To Mr. Walpole.-Ludicrous description

of the Scottish army's approach to the

capital.-Animadversions on Pope 134
LXII, "To Dr. Wharton.-His amusements in

• 130

No.

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town.-Reflections on riches.-Charac-
ter of Aristotle

136
LXIII: To Mr. Walpole-Observations on his tra-

gedy of Agrippina.-Admirable picture

of true philosophy
LXIV. To Mr. Walpole.Ridicule on Cibber's

Observations on Cicero.-On the mo-
dern Platonic dialogue.- Account of his
own and Mr. West's poetical composi-
tions

141
LXV. To Mr. Walpole. - Criticisms on Mr.
Spence's Polymetis

143
LXVI. To Mr. Walpole.-Ludicrous compliment

of condolence on the death of his fa-
vourite cat, enclosing an ode on that
subject

146
LXVII. To Dr. Wharton..Loss by fire of a house

in Cornhill-On Diodorus Siculus.
M. Gresset's Poems.Thomson's Castle
of Indolence.--Ode to a Water Nymph,
with a character of its author

148
LXVIII. To Dr. Wharton. More on M. Gresset.

-Account of his own projected poem
on the alliance between government and
education

• 150
LXIX. To Dr. Wharton.-Character of M. de

Montesquieu's L'Esprit des Loix • 151
LXX. To Dr. Wharton. Account of books con-

tinued.-Crebillion's Catalina.-Birch's
State Papers.-Of his own studies, and
a table of Greek chronology, which he
was then forming

152
LXXI. To Dr. Wharton.-Ludicrous account of

the Duke of Newcastle's installation at
Cambridge.-On the ode then perform-
ed, and more concerning the author
of it.

154
LXXII. To his Mother.Consolatory on the death
of her sister

156

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No.
LXXIII. To Mr. Walpole.--Encloses his Elegy in
a Country Church-yard

157
LXXIV. To Dr. Wharton.Wishes to be able to

pay him a visit at Durham.-On Dr.
Middleton's death. Some account of
the first volumes of Buffon's Histoire
Naturelle

158
LXXV. To Dr. Wharton.-On the il reception

which his Long Story met with in
town when handed about in manuscript,
and how much his Elegy in a Country
Church-yard was applauded

160
LXXVI. To Mr. Walpole.-Desires him to give his

Elegy to Mr. Dodsley to be printed im-
mediately, in order to prevent its publi-
cation in a magazine .

161
LXXVII. To Mr. Walpole.—A letter of thanks for

Mr. Walpole's care of his literary pro-
ductions

162
LXXVIII. To Mr. Walpole.--Desires his opinion of

the Elfrida of Mr. Mason.-Proposes
somo alterations in his Elegy

164
LXXIX. To Mr. Walpole.-Remarks on the Elegy

of Mr. Lyttelton, aad likewise on some
of his own productions

165
LXXX. To Mr. Walpole.--Humorous inquiry into

the state of Mr. Walpole's forthcoming
publications, &c.

167
LXXXI. To Mr. Walpole. With his Hymn to Ad-

versity.-Remarks on Dr.C. Middleton's

Essay on Miracles .
LXXXII. To Mr. Walpole. With a promise of

shortly sending his Pindaric Ode 171
LXXXIII. To Mr. Walpole. Remarks on Dodsley's

Collection of Poems, and on several li-
terary characters of the time, together
with an extract from a poem .

172
LXXXIV. 'To Dr. Wharton.-Of Madame Mainte-

non's character and letters.--His high

168

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