Imagini ale paginilor
PDF
ePub

On the first of January, 1835, the shares of capital stock issued amounted to $122,450, to which must be a lded the mortgages and obligations, $61,000, making a total of $183,450.

By the preceding statement it will be seen that there has been this year a great diminution of the Company's business, contrary to the expectations of the managers, and the views entertained in their last report. This result is to be ascribed chiefly to the embarrassments which have so generally prevailed, by which some of the operators on the road were obliged to withdraw from the business, and partially to the surplus stock of coal on hand at the close of the last season.

It will also be seen from the statement submitted, that the item of repairs has been materially increased. In regard to this subject, it was stated in the last annual report, "The experience of the past year has shown that the increased amount of transportation on the rail road to Schuylkill Haven from the junction where the coal trade of the west and west-west branches unites, will expose the heavy (descending) track of that section of the road to an rlier deterioration than any other part of it." It was at the same time stated that the Board had in consideration the best manner of improving or renewing that portion of the road. The managers have now the satisfaction of informing the stockholders that as an experiment a single track of iron edge rails extending fifteen hundred feet, has been laid on the present sleepers.

From experience thus obtained, it appears to be the most judicious plan for efficiency and permanency that can be adopted. It can be executed in detail so as greatly to reduce the annual repairs, and without creating a burthen to the stockholders. The cost of this improvement, included under the head of permanent improvements, was $1213 72.

As regards the prospects of the approaching season, the managers, notwithstanding the discouragements of the past year, cannot but entertain confident expectations of very favorable results. The supply of anthra cite coal from all regions this year, is less by about 118,000 tons than that of the last year; and there is every reason to believe, from the increased consump tion, that at the commencement of spring operations, there will be no surplus on hand.

Should this, so highly probable, be the case, a fresh impulse will be given to the coal trade; especially as those causes no longer exist, which, during the past year, have so affected its prosperity in common with other branches of industry.

As an index of the expansion of the company's business, and the capabilities of the road, the subjoined statement of operations since it was opened for trade is furnished:

[blocks in formation]

We have no hesitation in predicting that navigation may be recommenced by the 22d of February, which will be more than five weeks earlier than the time at which, the Wheeling editor said, the Canal usually opened-making a difference of thirteen weeks in the term of interruption.-Pittsburgh Gaz. Collectors Office,

Allegheny, W. D. Pa. Canal, Jan. 3, 1835. Whole amount received from Nov. 1, 1834, as per last weekly statement, Amount received in the week ending Jan. 2, 1835,

Whole amount received to Jan. 3, 1835,

10 boats cleared, having tonnage
For. tonnage received from the East,

$3,115 45

32 89 $3,148 34

lbs. 103,085 341,332

[blocks in formation]

Tract." It is situated from two and a half to three There are 60 acres in what is termed the "Spohn miles from the landings. There is one vein of Coal about seven feet in thickness which runs through the thickness running some distance under the seven feet property about 900 yards, and one vein four feet in vein. The present proprietor paid $16,000 for the property, and expended about $2000 in improvements -making $18,000. He has mined out of the tract the coal is worked out above the water level, for 10,000 about 20,000 tons of coal-sold the property, after all

and has been offered $8,000 for the coal yet remaining in the tract above the water level, supposed to ex

ceed 20,000 tons.-Ibid.

LAKE ERIE.

There are now on lake Erie, thirty-four steam boats, of which thirty-two are owned in the United States, and over 150 brigs, schooners and sloops, besides a large number which belong on lake Ontario and the river St. Lawrence, but trade regularly with the ports on this and the upper lakes. The s'eamboats are con

fined almost exclusively to the conveying of passengers, at which they find constant and profitable employment, during the season of navigation.

About four-fifths of the business of the boats is done in their trips up the lake. Of course over one half of the passengers westward remain to populate the vast region, beyond the lakes. Of the actual emigration westward, it is calculated that less than one half go by steam boats, the remainder making their journey by, land or on board the numerous other vessels which are fitted up in good style for comfort and pleasure. The emigration westward, through and by this place, during the past year, cannot be estimated at less than 100,000 persons. This number added to the hitherto immense population of those regions, and the prospect of a progressive increase of emigration annually for many years

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

this Bridge is now finished in a very neat and substantial manner, and that it was formally thrown open for crossing, by the Directors of the Company on New Year's day. It will be a great accommodation to a large portion of the citizens of New Jersey as well as this state, being the only bridge over the Delaware river between Trenton and New Hope. We do not know the rates of Toll, but have understood that from the favorable terms upon which the bridge has been built that the Directors will be able to place the charges for toll at a very moderate rate.-Bucks Co. Intel.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Vaccine Physicians.

Dr. James M'Clintock Dr. Jeremiah M'Cready
Dr. Wm. S. Zantzinger Dr. J. Dunott.
Collectors of Vaccine cases.

James Kerr. S. W. District Thomas Porter, N. E. Dis
James Gladding S. E. “ John M. Fernsler, N. W. "

STATEMENT,

Showing the amount of Paper each Bank in the State of Pennsylvania, has in circulation, in Bills of the denomination of FIVE DOLLARS, as reported, to the Auditor General of this Commonwealth, from the 20th of December, 1834, to the 9th day of January, 1835.

Bank of Northumberland,
Wyoming Bank, at Wilkesbarre,
Lebanon Bank,

Kensington Bank, Philadelphia,
Girard Bank,

Bank of Germantown,

Bank of Montgomery County,
Farmers' Bank of Lancaster,

$73,965

17,085

27,400

44,700

17,990

75,245

30,215

33,165

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, Philadelphia, 57,275
Bank of Penn Township,
Southwark Bank,
Moyamensing Bank,

Bank of the Northern Liberties,
Farmers' Bank of Reading,

York Bank,

Bank of Chester county, Miner's Bank of Pottsville, Bank of Chambersburg,

47,005

42,900

38 545

59,924

61,525

Merchants' and Manufacturers' Bank of Pittsburg,

96,000

24,155

34,755

30,820

35,000

822

Doylestown Bank of Buck's County,

26,330

718 Manufacturers' and Mechanics' Bank, Phila

612

delphia,

61,365

82

Bank of Pennsylvania,

199,940

Mechanics' Bank of Philadelphia,

52,375

1634

Columbia Bridge Company,

15,000

Bank ot Pittsburg,

136,950

Monongahela Bank of Brownsville,

47,550

Erie Bank,

24,730

Bank of Gettysburg,

17,245

Commercial Bank of Pennsylvania,

51,375

Philadelphia Bank,

59,000

Bank of Delaware County,

12,000

Harrisburg Bank,

71,000

Bank of Middletown,

31,985

Farmers' Bank of Bucks County, Schuylkill Bank,

19,060

106,850

Northampton Bank,

87,885

Western Bank of Philadelphia,

71,560

Easton Bank,

84,000

Lancaster Bank,

29,585

$2,014,525

DANIEL STURGEON.

[blocks in formation]

Auditor General's Office, Jannary 12, 1835.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA. The members of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania are informed that the Annual Meeting will be held at the Philosophical Hall over the Athenæum, on Monday evening, February 2d, at 7 o'clock. The attendance of the members is particularly requested.

J. R. TYSON, Sec❜ry.

HAZARD'S

REGISTER OF PENNSYLVANIA.

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEFUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

VOL. XV.--NO. 6.

For the Register.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD.

PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY 7, 1835.

NOTES ON CUMBERLAND COUNTY. FURNISHED BY REDMOND CONYNGHAM. Cumberland was erected into a County on January 27th, 1749. Courts were directed to be held at some suitable place, until the necessary buildings were provided. Robert M'Coy, Benjamin Chambers, David Magaw, James M'Intire and John M'Cormick, were appointed Commissioners to select a plot of ground on which to erect the Court-house and jail.

Shippensburg was selected as a temporary seat of

Justice.

Messrs. Lyon and Armstrong, were el-cted by the proprietaries to lay out a town on the road from Harris's ferry, leading through the rich valley of Cumberland, including the old stoccade and blockhouse and extending over the big spring called Le Tort (now Letort,) after James Le Tort a French Swiss who acted as Indian Interpreter and Messenger to Government, and who had erected a cabin at its source as early as the year 1735.

Carlisle was laid out in pursuance to their directions in 1750, and in 1753 the seat of justice was permanently located at Carlisle.

1750. The early settlement of this county is intimately connected with a disputed claim of the lands on the Conodoguinnet in Cumberland valley made by the Indians, but resisted by the Proprietary Government. The Governor and Council supported the rights of the Proprietaries, but the General Assembly those of

the Indians.

'No. 108.

firmed to the Shawnese and Delawares the promise of
protection made by Markham.

From that moment numbers of families of Indians fol-
lowed the sixty families who had sought and obtained
a resting place in Pennsylvania, and settled upon the
most fertile flats of the Susquehanna and Delaware.—
The Delawares and Shawnese became dependant finally
on the Northern Confederacy of Indians. Several
Treaties or Indian Talks were held afterwards at differ-
ent times, and in all of them references were made to
the confirmatory Treaty of William Penn.

In the year 1757, the Assembly complained of the
imperfect, incongruous and faint manner in which the
Indian Treaties were expressed, declaring they were
unintelligible. They urged the Governor to meet
Teedyuscung at the proposed conference at Easton.—
The Assembly were desirous of having possession of all
the Treaties made with the Shawnese and Delawares
including the Confirmatory Treaty of William Penn at
Shackamaxan. A committee was appointed by the
Assembly to obtain copies of certain Indian Treaties
from Richard Peters, Clerk of Council. Mr. Peters
refused.

The following letter was then sent to the Governor.
SIR:-

The application of the Committee of Assembly to you yesterday, was made in pursuance of an order of the House which was to inspect the minutes of Council respecting Indian purchases. They are desirous of seeing and having fair transcripts of all the Minutes that relate to the purchase made by William Penn about the year 1700 of the lands on Tohiccon, NeshamaThe Shawnese and Delawares complained that they ny, Lehigh and the Forks of the' Delaware or any of had been driven from their hunting ground by the con- them. The Minutes relating to the confirmatory purduct of the Proprietary Government, who had "survey-chase of the same Lands in 1737. The Minutes relaed all the land on the Conodoguinnet into a manor ting to the lands on the Brandywine. The minutes recontrary to treaty-contrary to faith without even pur-lating to the Juniatta and Conodoguinnet purchases, chasing the right to the soil." and those relating to the purchase made at Albany." JOSEPH FOX, WILLIAM MASTERS, THOMAS LEECH,

The Governor directed that an investigation should be made into all the circumstances, and the result laid before the Assembly.

July 13th, 1757. answer.

WILLIAM WEST,

JOSEPH GALLOWAY,

THOMAS YORK.

Richard Peters returned an

It appeared that about the year 1677, the Shawnese driven by persecution from Carolina and Georgia, came to the mouth of the Conestoga, and obtained the consent of the Susquehanna Indians to occupy the flats. On hearing of the arrival of Markham and Penn, commissioners in the Delaware, they went to Philadelphia and solicited protection which was granted. In 1682 the Chiefs of the Shawnese, Delawares and Susquehanna The Proprietaries directed their agents after the "That in all Indians, met William Penn at Shackamaxan, who con- Treaty made with the Indians in 1755.

"That he (the Governor,) will not permit you to inspect the Council Books."

370

VOL. XV.

The Shawnese claim said they were permitted to

les made by them, they should take particular pains to encourage the emigration of the Irish into Cumber-occupy the flats at the mouth of the Conestoga, and land County from Lancaster County as serious distur bances had arisen in consequence of disputes between the Irish and Germans at Elections. The Proprietaries desired that York should be settled by Germans, and Cumberland by Irish.

James Le Tort by some of the manuscripts, is stated to have penetrated to Cumberland valley as early as 1731. His first cabin was burnt by the Indians. It stood at the head of the spring. He received for his services twelve pounds annually.

HISTORICAL NOTES,

In relation to the Shawnese and Delawares.

BY REDMOND CONYNGHAM.

The following question was put to Robert H. Morris, Esquire, Deputy Governor, by the Assembly.

"Do you know of any disgust or injury the Delawares or Shawnese had ever received from Pennsylva nia, and by what means their affections could be so alienated as to take up the hatchet?"

were promised hunting ground, and protection, by Markham; that this promise was confirmed by William Penn at Shackamaxan. That a treaty of purchase was afterwards concluded with the Shawnese, of their claim to the lands they occupied on the Susquehanna, they consenting to remove to lands on the Conodoguinnet, surveyed for their use by order of the Proprietaries. — The intrusion of the white settlers upon their hunting ground or resting place, proved a fresh source of grievance; they remonstrated to the Governor and to the Assembly, until finally they withdrew and placed themselves under the protection of the French.

HISTORICAL NOTES.

BY REDMOND CONINGHAM.

Culpeper, Surveyor General, in the year 1677, seized upon the Revenues and Government of South Carolina. In 1683, he was succeded by Seth Sothel.

Several families of Indians planted their Wigwams

Page 246, Franklin's Works, Vol. 2. also see votes on the banks of the Susquehanna, in 1678, having emiof Assembly.

[ocr errors]

The Governor gave no satisfactory answer. "Notice was taken by the Assembly of dissatisfaction expressed at an Indian Treaty held in 1753, by a Chief of the Shawnese, of a promise made to him on the behalf of the Proprietaries, which had not been complied with."

grated from Carolina, and many followed them in the year 1684.

In 1712, the Indians in North Carolina plotted the destruction of the whites, which was barbarously put in execution. Colonel Barnewell with a large force was sent from South Carolina;-he succeeded in defeating the Indians in a general engagement, and afterwards attacked and destroyed the town of Tuscarora. The Tuscaroras, in consequence, abandoned their posBig Beaver, a Shawnese Chief, in 1753, at Carlisle, sessions, and followed the Shawanese, who had settled refers to a promise made by William Penn at Shaka-on the waters of the Susquehanna, and finally formed maxon, of hunting ground for ever.

See page 259 of Franklin's Works, Vol. 2. also votes of Assembly.

The House of Assembly, in relation to the Shawnese complaint, express themselves thus:

[ocr errors]

"We are, however, convinced by original minutes taken by one of the Commissioners at the Treaty of Carlisle, now lying before us, that the Shawnese Chiefs mentioned that claim of theirs to the lands in question at that time, and were promised that the matter should be laid before the Proprietaries. It was after the business of the Treaty was over, and not inserted in the printed account of the Treaty.” "But one of the Commissioners, as appears by the report, forgot the whole transaction."

a union with the Five Nations,

In 1715, a number of Indian families of the Yamassee, emigrated to Pennsylvania from Georgia.

The establishment of Wigwams in Pennsylvania by the early Indian emigrants, were objects of jealousy and dissatisfaction to the Five nations and the white settlers, hence the great desire of their Chiefs to obtain the protection of Markham and Penn's Commissioners, on their arrival, and the favour of William Penn, in 1682.

The gracious promise of protection made to those unfortunate Indians by William Penn at the Great

Franklin's Works, Vol. 2. page 278; also votes of Treaty, was no doubt the principal inducement to emiAssembly.

[blocks in formation]

grate into Pennsylvania by the Southern Indians, who afterwards removed from Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PHILADELPHIA.

snow

cloudy

snow

cloudy

We recollect when upon the square of ground extending from Chestnut to Market, and from 9th to 10th sts. there stood but one house, which was that of Mr. Markoe, fronting on Market street. The square was surrounded by a post and rail fence, and was covered with rich grass, and many is the butter cup, and four leaved clover that we have climbed over the fence to pull. Another quinque genarian desires us to state, that one of the finest English snipes he ever shot, was on that lot, at the northeast corner of Chestnut and Tenth streets, where Mr. Kelley's house now stands.

The former part of this month was remarkable for | RECOLLECTIONS OF THE LAST CENTURY— the clearness of the weather. The latter part was comparatively cloudy, and attended with frequent falls of snow. There were six days entirely clear, and 15 others partly clear; eight days the sky was obscured by clouds during the whole of each day. Rain fell on six days, and snow fell on six different days, but the quantity on each occasion was small, with the excep tion of that which commenced on the night of the 28th, and continued until the forenoon of the 30th. The depth of this snow has been variously estimated. The general opinion of those whom I have consulted in relation thereto, is that it would measure more than a foot; but from several measurements which I made in the woodland and places where it was least liable to be affected by the winds, I am inclined to believe that it would not average more than nine inches.

There were five days on which the temperature was below the freezing point during the whole of each day-15-17-26-28-29. The coldest day was the 15th, at sunrise, at which time the mercury was at 10 degrees above zero:-And the following day at noon, was the warmest, being 58 degrees.

The average for the whole month was about seven degrees lower than the preceding month, being 31 degrees a sunrise-40 at noon, and 36 at sunset.

The Brandywine was frozen over for the first time this season, on the 15th.

The Eclipse of the moon on the 16th, was observed through an atmosphere overcast with clouds similar to those which prevailed during the late solar eclipse. C. H. West Bradford Boarding School.

We recollect when the square on the south side of Pine street, between Fifth and Sixth streets, was a brick-kiln pond, and a famous place for skating. Many an urchin has broken in at a spot where a comfortable kitchen fire is now blazing.

We recollect when upon the spot where Abbot's brew house now stands, at the end of Pear street in Dock street, there was a high hill with its declevity to the north, which was a capital place for running down with sleds, in time of snow. The remains of that hill are still in part observable at the back end of the lot upon which Mr. Charles Wharton's house now stands on Second st.

We recollect when Peale's Museum consisted of a few objects, collected in an old frame building at the southwest corner of Lombard and Third streets.

We recollect when the only theatre which Philadel phia possessed, consisted of that large one story brick building, with its gable end fronting on South street, between Fourth and Fifth streets, which is still in existence, occupied asa distillery.-Philadelphia Gaz.

« ÎnapoiContinuă »