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The business this year, in Ship Building, promises to be very considerable.
There are at present on the stocks, and in an advanced state in Kensington,

1 Barque of about 260 tons.

3 Schoooners, each about 114 tons.

1 Steamboat, 360 tons.

1 Steamboat, tonnage not ascertained.

3 Steam Tow Boats, one of them of 230 tons.

1 Steamboat, launched, and nearly finished.

1

do rebuilt to be launched to-day.

In Southwark, brig Artamonia, of about 200 tons-launched on Thursday last.

IMPROVEMENT.

HOLLIDAYSBURG, April 12, 1835.

To the Editor of the Columbia Spy:

from different sections of the Union, and a few from trans-atlantic states, occupying various stations of respectability and usefulness in public and private life.Two of the passengers were clergymen, and many others were professors of religion of different evange lical denominations, and all were orderly and quiet persons.

Dear Sir,-Through the columns of your paper, per. mit me to communicate a few remarks upon the facilities now offered to travellers, by Leech & Co. in their line of boats on the Pennsylvania Canal. In remarking At the request of the master of the packet and many on this line, it is not designed to undervalue the advan- of the passengers, after mature deliberation the clergytages on other lines, nor on other boats. The writer men, from all the circumstances of the case, deemed it has no interest to serve in this communication, but the their duty to change their original purpose of leaving public welfare. To all concerned he is a stranger, and the packet on Saturday evening, and to remain on a simple statement of facts is all that is designed. On board for the purpose of conducting divine worship Friday last, about 6 o'clock P. M. the packet boat New York, Mr. P. L. Wood, master, left Columbia, having on board 140 passengers, gentlemen and ladies

during the Sabbath. Divine service was therefore conducted publicly, at half past 10 o'clock, A. M. and at 2 o'clock, P. M. in which all the company united.—

95-ths.

The exercises were solemn and impressive. The whole day wore the aspect of solemnity. The sound of the horn and the hammer and other instruments ordinarily employed in conducting the packet onward, ceased, and the day was quiet. Although the passengers were so numerous, yet, by the prompt, faithful, and kind attention of the master, all were brought through the route with safety and great satisfaction.To the attention and kindness of Mr. Wood, the company felt peculiarly obligated-and as an evidence of their feelings of obligation, on their near approach to this place, assembled on deck, and unanimously adopt. ed the following resolution, viz.

271

amount of purchase money with six per cont. per annum interest thereon. Number two shall pay such purchase money and four and one haif per cent. per annum interest thereon. Number three shall pay such purchase money and three per cent. per annum interest thereon. Number four shall pay the original purchase money without interest.

Section 4. The board of appraisers shall keep a record of their valuations in a book to be kept for that purpose, and a certified copy thereof under seal shall be good evidence on an application to procure patents and pay the purchase money due the commonwealth. Section 5. The appraisers before entering on the du Resolved, That in consideration of the kind atten- ties enjoined on them by this act, shall be sworn or af tions and courteous manners of Mr. B. L. Wood, mas-firmed that they will justly and impartially appraise the ter of the packet boat New York, to the passengers land in all cases where called to act, and shall be allow committed to his care, from Columbia to Hollidaysburg, ed one dollar and fifty cents per day for each day spent, we deem it due both to him, and our own feelings, pub- and four cents for each mile circular travelled by them licly to express to him our thanks, and also to recom- in discharging the duties enjoined by this act. mend the boat to persons who may have occasion to visit the far west. Sined by

A. B. SHAW,
A. GLINES,

of Massachusetts, in behalf of the Company of passengers.

Of the number that left Columbia, 112 were landed at this place, all going to the West. The packet arrived this afternoon at 3 o'clock-passing the whole line, 171 miles, in sixty-nine hours. There is perhaps propriety in saying while the facilities of this line are many -that the vast amount of travelling on it to the West, calls upon the company to increase their efforts for accommodating the public-could longer cabins be constructed in the packets, or extra packets be in readiness when needed, and could additional cars for the rail roads be provided, so that passengers could be forwarded immediately in all cases of arrival, doubtless the company would be well rewarded by the extra numbers that would be induced to take this in preference to any other route to the valley of the Mississippi-a failure in attention to these things may seriously affect the interests of the company in future. That they may succeed in their efforts, and obtain a due share of patronage, is the sincere desire of one of the hundred and forty passengers.

Yours respectfully,

X. Y.

The following Act passed both Houses of the Legislature, April 4, 1835.

An Act to graduate the Lands on which money is due and unpaid to the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, that the county commission ers of the several counties of this commonwealth shall be a board of appraisers for the following purpose, viz. It shall be their duty to appraise all lands on which any purchase money is due to this commonwealth, if desired so to do by the owner or owners thereof, a majority of the board to view the ground, the expense of such appraisement to be paid by the owner of the land.

Section 6. This act shall continue in force three years and no longer.

Section 7. All laws of this commonwealth are hereby repealed so far as they are altered by this act, and no further.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Your Memorialists Respectfully Represent : That they see with surprise a bill reported to your honorable bodies for erecting a Bridge across the River Schuylkill at some point below the city of Philadelphia, which they beg leave to remonstrate against for the follow reasons:

Because the river Schuylkill is a common highway for the benefit of all the citizens of the State; any thing therefore which obstructs it not only injures Philadel phia, but nearly the whole trade of Pennsylvania. Vessels of from two to three hundred tons, now load at its wharves with coal and other productions, and depart without delay or inconvenience-which could not be the case if this bridge is built-as canals around abutments of bridges have been found in all cases to present obstacles to navigation.

Because extensive wharves and warehouses have been made on the river for the accommodation of the coal and country trade, which would be greatly injured, if not rendered useless by such a work.

Because such a bridge is not necessary either for travelling or commerce, there being already three bridges over that river; and if the object as alleged is, to carry the trade to the Southwark Rail Road, the shortest pos sible way to accomplish it, is to lay rails on the piers of the Permanent Bridge at Market street; from thence to join the Rail Road at Broad street, which joins the Southwark Rail Road.

Because a bridge will eventually cut off the entire trade of the city front of the Schuylkill. Vessels of the larger class can only pass draw bridges at certain state of the tides, thereby creating great detention, subjecting them to injury from running foul, breaking their rigging, &c. &c. Captains already complain of the one at Grey's Ferry below the city, and if another is added, your memorialists are fearful they would object to going up the Schuylkill altogether.

Because if the trade of the Schuylkill for sea vessels is interrupted, it must throw the burthen on country produce in transporting it over the city to the Delaware for exportation-which additional expense will fall exclusively upon country merchants and farmers. To the Schuylkill coal trade such a bridge will be almost total destruction, as the article is entirely exported from that River.

Section 2. The board or a majority of them shall appraise such land or lands for its cash value, and shall make a table of rates, numbers one, two, three, four. All land valued at ten dollars per acre and upwards, shall be rated number one. All land valued at more than seven and less than ten dollars per acre shall be rated number two. All lands valued at more than four dollars and not more than seven dollars per acre, shall be rated number three. All lands valued at four dol- Because your memorialists are informed that an Act las or less per acre, shall be rated number four. Pro- of Incorporation is now in existence, for building a vided, that in making the valuation of lands the value bridge at Grey's Ferry, 80 feet high, which would anof the buildings thereon erected shall be deducted.swer the purpose without interrupting commerce. Section 3. All land rated number one, shall pay the All which is respectfully submitted.

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HAZARD'S

REGISTER OF PENNSYLVANIA.

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEFUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD.

VOL. XV.--NO. 18.

HOUSE OF REFUGE.

PHILADELPHIA, MAY 2, 1835.

No. 382.

confined to household work, the making and mending

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the of the clothing for the inmates, and the necessary do

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

mestic occupations for ensuring the comfort and cleanliness of their department.

The Managers of the House of Refuge, in presenting From this physical labor, the inmates are directed to their Annual Report, conformably to the requisitions of that intellectual employment calculated to combine in the charter, cannot but congratulate the friends of the a happy degree with the manual skill which they are Institution, among whom they have great pleasure to thus acquiring and to render them better capable of rank your honorable bodies, upon the increased success of this noble experiment of charity which has retaining that rank in the society of their fellows, to which the managers confidently trust the Institution originated and been fostered by the exertions and aid may be the blessed instrument of introducing them.of the benevolent, and by none more than by the The schools are now in a more satisfactory state of useaccredited organs of the people of this commonwealth.fulness and improvement than it has yet been our priThe Managers regarding with attention and anxiety every event and progress of opinion calculated to affect the interests of an institution whose welfare is dear to their hearts, have seen with great satisfaction, those prejudices which originally threatened to trammel its operations and limit its usefulness, gradually receding before that conviction of its good design and appreciations of its important results, reaching the hearts of all and animating to renewed interest in its behalf.

vilege to announce. The present teacher has the confidence of the Board, and by his unremitting attention and interest in his department, gives earnest of successful results. The report annexed will show the present state of this portion of the institution.

The duties of the week being thus pointed out, and regularly fulfilled, the subjects of the House are upon the Sabbath, twice assembled in the chapel, engaging in the worship of God and listening to the expounding of the truth of the Gospel. Benevolent clergymen of different denominations devote themselves to this reli

When the individual has been, in the opinion of the Managers, reformed by the discipline of the House, and gives promise of future correct deportment and a desire to attain his proper station in the community, he is, in the discretion of a committee, placed by inden tures under the charge of a suitable master, always with a view of consonance with his habits and inclinations.

It is with pleasure we recur to the late visit of a portion of the Legislature, satisfied that a personal investigation of the organization, conduct, economy and regu-gious instruction of the inmates, and we are from exlations of the House, in all its departments, and with perience justified in believing, with much success. In regard to its subjects, is the surest guarantee of an in- the Sunday school, the exertions of gentlemen, anxious crease of that confidence, in the Directors and Officers for the spiritual welfare of the beings placed under our of the Institution, which you have hitherto been pleas-care, are continual, and improvement is evident in ed most generously to manifest. The difficulties which attention, interest and knowledge. have been hitherto encountered in devising suitable occupations for the boys, have now, we have every reason to hope, been remedied. The employments consist of Shoemaking, Bookbinding, the manufacture of brass nails, and the furniture of umbrellas, for the larger and more skilful boys, in all which trades they exhibit much diligence and rapid improvement;—while the smaller and less capable are profitably employed in the making of cane seats for chairs, and forming the The Legislature may thus see the entire scope and split rattan to a suitable size and form for bonnet mak-objects of the House of Refuge. Preserving the origiThe managers respectfully appeal to the recol-nal plan of its founders, disclaiming all analogy to the lections of those gentlemen who have lately visited the name of Prison, the managers confidently trust that House, for proof of the skill, diligence and cheerfulness the House has become a school of reform and salutary manifested by those employed in these various occupa- moral discipline. To rescue the youthful from the tions. In disposing of those who are subjected to the haunts of vice or the pursuits of idleness; to place a discipline of the House among the different trades, con- barrier between them and their associates in crime or sideration is invariably had of their former habits of folly; to actuate them to the practice and habit of inlife, their apparent skill, general capability and inclina-dustry, by directing them in the way of useful employtion, though always tempered by the discretion of ment; to instruct their minds in those branches of the Superintendent. The employment of the girls is knowledge best calculated for their advancement in

ers.

VOL. X V.

35

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