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On two Genera and several Species of Crinoidea. Descriptions of New Hemipterous Insects collected in the expedition to the Rocky Mountains.

A new Genus of Mammalia proposed, and a description of the species upon which it is founded. By T. Say and George Ord.

Description of a New Species of Mammalia, whereon a New Genus is proposed to be founded. By T. Say and George Ord.

On a new species of Modiola.

VOL. V.

Descriptions of New Species of Hister and Hololepta inhabiting the United States.

Descriptions of some New Species of Fresh Water and Land Shells of the United States.

On the Species of the Linnæan Genus Asterias inhabiting the coast of the United States.

Descriptions of New Species of Coleopterous Insects inhabiting the United States.

Descriptions of Marine Shells recently discovered on the coast of the United States.

On the Species of the Linnæan Genus Echinus inhabiting the coast of the United States.

Descriptions of North American Dipterous Insects. Descriptions of New North American Hemipterous Insects, belonging to the first family of the section Homoptera of Latreille.

In the "Account of an Expedition from Pittsburg to the Rocky Mountains, performed in the years 1819 and 1820."

of various Memoirs, Narratives and Notes, incorporated The whole department of Zoology; with the addition into the body of the work. Besides what is published, it will be remembered that Mr. Say was robbed of a large mass of collections and papers.

In the "Narrative of an Expedition to the Source of St. Peter's River, Lake Winnepeek, Lake of the Woods, &c. &c. performed in the year 1823.”

The notes of all that relates to the Zoology and Botany of the country traversed; as well as much of the matter relating to the Indians. Also, the greater part of the Appendix, viz: the article Zoology, in 124 pages; the specimens and other materials, which enabled Mr. de Schweinitz to compose the article Botany; and the Killisteno portion of the Vocabularies of Indian Languages.

In the American edition of Nicholson's Encyclopædia.

The new modelling of the whole department of Natural History, with the addition of all the American matter, including an extensive account of American Insects and Shells.

American Entomology, or Descriptions of the Insects

Contributions of the Maclurian Lyceum of Philadelphia. of North America, illustrated by coloured figures from

Remarks on some Reptilia of Dr. Harlan. Note on Le Conte's Coleopterous Insects of North America.

Descriptions of New Species of Hymenoptera of the United States. [Not completed.]

original drawings executed from Nature. Philadelphia Museum, vol. i. 1824; vol. ii. 1825; vol. iii. 1828; Glosary, 1825.

American Conchology, or Descriptions of the Shells of North America, illustrated by coloured figures, from original drawings executed from Nature. Six numbers

Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New York, and a Glossary. New Harmony, Indiana, 1830-1834.

Vol. I.

Descriptions of New American Species of the Genera Buprestis, Trachys and Elater. Western Quarterly Reporter of Medical, Surgical, and Natural Science; edited by John D. Godman, M. D., Vol. II.

Descriptions of Insects belonging to the Order Neuroptera, Linn., Latreille. Collected by the Expedition under the command of Major Long, [to the Rocky Mountains.]

Siliman's Journal, Vol. I.

Notes on Herpetology. Observations on some species of Zoophytes, Shells, &c. principally fossil. [Continued into vol. ii. Contains the first account of New Jersey Mart Fossils.] Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1819. On the Genus Ocythoe; being an extract of a letter from Thomas Say, Esq. of Philadelphia, to Wm. Elford Leach, M. D. F. R. S. American Philosophical Transactions, Vol. I. New Series.

A Monograph of North American Insects of the Genus Cicindela.

VOL. II.

Descriptions of Insects of the families of Carabici and Ilydrocanthari of Latreille, inhabiting North America.

VOL. IV.

Descriptions of New North American Insects, and Observations upon some already described [Part of this paper was also printed in the New Harmony Dis seminator.]

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STATEMENT OF DEATHS, WITH THE DISEASES AND AGES,
In the City and Liberties of Philadelphia, during the year 1834.

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STATEMENT OF DEATHS-CONTINUED.

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2810 2263 1526 12581578442 385 168 81 130 559547 394 279 244 14919121 55073

Of the above there were Males of 20 years and upwards, 1284; under 20 years, 1526; Females of 20 years and upwards, 1,005; under 20 years, 1258.

There were 556 returns received at the Health Office, of persons who died in the Alms House of the City and Districts during the year; 519 People of Colour are included in the total number of deaths.

Agreeably to returns made at the Health Office and collected from 151 Practitioners of Midwifery, there were born in the City and Liberties, during the year 1834, 3937 Male, and 3635 Female children, making the total number of Births 7572, leaving a difference between the Births and Deaths of 2499.

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HISTORICAL NOTES.

BY REDMOND CONTINGHAM,

(Continued from page 118.)

When William Penn was preparing to return to Europe, he sent for the Chiefs of the Conestoga and Susquehanna Indians, and renewed his promise of protection. This occurred in 1701, therefore the Chief of the Conestoga Indians who addressed Sir William Keith in 1721, must have had a perfect recollection of all the circumstances attending the conference in 1701. In Proud's History of Pennsylvania, page 326, there is a note which is inaccurate. "The Conestoga Indians are the remains of a Tribe of the Six Nations." What fol. lows is correct. "On the first arrival of the English in Pennsylvania, messengers from this Tribe came to welcome them with presents of venison, corn, and skins; and the whole Tribe entered into a Treaty of Friendship with the first Proprietary, William Penn, which was to last as long as the Sun should shine or the waters run into the rivers."

The lines in italics may have been used in the Great Treaty, as the expression was a favorite one with the Indians. The Delawares on one occasion say "This Treaty shall continue as long as the Sun shall rise or the waters flow."

The writer of the pamphlet may have been acquainted with the fact that the Conestoga Indians held a conference with Penn's commissioners after their arrival, but entered into the Treaty of Friendship with William Penn only.

"In the latter part of this year, 1682, the Proprietary having finished his business with the Indians, undertook to lay out a plan for the city."

Proud's History, page 233, volume First.

This evidently alludes to the Great Treaty made with the Indians, as that would be his principal business. By referring to the early histories of the Southern Colonies, it will be seen that in the year 1698 there existed no particular cause to compel the Indians to seek for an asylum in Pennsylvania; but in 1677, 1678, &c, the histories of Carolina and Virginia fully corroborate the statements of the Conestoga Indians, as to the time when they settled within this Province.

The Great Treaty having been made before Philadelphia was laid out, fully confirms public opinion in

the conviction that it was made at Shackamaxan.

Have you reason to believe that a Treaty was regularly executed by Penn's commissioners with the Shawanese, before the arrival of William Penn?

It had rather the character of an Indian conference, which afterwards was ratified as a Treaty, at Shackamaxan, by William Penn. By the Shawanese and Del. awares, the first was considered as the preliminary, the second as the confirmatory Treaty. When allusion was made to them, it was customary for the warriors of the

Delawares and Shawanese to designate them as "the first Treaties made with Onas."

Proud's History of Pennsylvania, volume First, see note at the bottom of page 214, where part of Tee deuscung's speech is given.

"The first Treaties of Friendship made by Onas our himself and his people first came over here." Great Friend, deceased, with our Forefathers, when

Tradition tells us, that the commissioners of William Penn resided at Shackamaxan, and that the Indian conference with Markham, was held under the Elm in the summer of 1682, at Shackamaxan. If this be correct, there can be no doubt of the second conference having taken place on the same spot, for the Indians would select it in preference to any other situation, especially on account of the Tree. This explains why the Treaty was made under the Tree, in December, with William Penn; as the Tree would naturally be looked upon by the Indians with awe and reverence, and be considered by them as rendering the Treaty indissoluble.

The Indians who resided at Conestoga having removed from Virginia in the year 1677, still continued to hunt in their old ground, which caused a disagreement between them and the Southern Indians, in the year seventeen hundred and nineteen, and the loss of their king in a skirmish; they sent a deputation to Governor Keith, to request his protection. The Governor in the spring of 1721, went to Virginia to consult with the Governor of that state, as to the best plan for the security delphia, he sent to the Indians at Conestoga a message or common safety of the Indians; on his return to Phila by John Cartlidge, that he would meet them in Council on the fifth of July, and he sent a similar message by James Le Torte, to the Five Nations. In the afternoon of that day, Governor Keith held a conference with the Shawanese Chiefs of Conestoga Indians, whom he call. ed his children, and the deputies of the Five Nations, whom he called their Friends, at Conestoga.

Governor Keith reminded the Conestoga Indians, that their oppressor, Nathaniel Bacon, had fallen a victim to his passions, in 1677, and that the present Governor of Virginia was their friend, and that “he requested them not to cross the Potomac in future, and that his Indians should not hereafter, disturb you in your hunting grounds." "I have made this agreement which you must keep. It is but a few years since Wil. liam Penn spoke to your Nation in Council, which your Chiefs must well remember. Onas gave you good and will see that you suffer no hurt, for you are my counsel, which you must never forget." "I leave you, children. I will speak to you to-morrow in Council, and on the day after to the warriors of Seneka, Onondago, and Cayouga.”

A Conestoga Chief replied to Sir William Keith.deep, the tree top is high, the Branches spread in warm "The Roots of the Tree of Friendship are planted weather when the weary Indian sleeps beneath its shade, so is the Indian protected by Onas when danger

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