Imagini ale paginilor
PDF
ePub

exhibited by Dr. Whitby, in the General Preface to his Commentary, s viii. pp. 24–26. 4to. edit.*

3. Because the matter contained in the Scriptures requires a

Divine Inspiration. Such as,

The history of the Creation, ascribed to God only, Gen. 1. 1 ; Ps. 124. 8; 146. 6; Neh. 9. 6; Acts 14. 15; 17. 24 ;—and wrought by the second person in the Godhead, Jesus Christ, John 1. 3, 10; 1 Cor. 8.6; Eph. 3. 9; Col. 1. 16; Heb. 1.2; Rev. 4. 11.7

The Deluge, Gen. 6. 13; 7.

Mysteries respecting a Trinity of persons in the godhead, Matt. 28. 19; 2 Cor. 13. 14; 1 John 5. 7: proved by divinity being ascribed to different persons in the godhead, Gen. 1.1; 2. 26; 2 Sam. 23. 2; Is. 6. 3 ; Hag. 2. 5; Zech. 3. 2; 4. 14; 13. 7; Matt. 3. 16; 17.5; 28. 19; Luke 1. 35; John 14, 16, 26; 15. 26; 16. 13; 2 Cor. 13. 14.7

In Deut. 6. 4, we read, yox,7770 775x 77.7 Sxov yow, Shema Yisraël,. Yehowah Elohainoo, Yehowah aichod, 'Hear, Israel, JEHOVAH, our GOD, is one JEHOVAH.' On this passage the Jews lay great stress ; and it is one of the four passages which they write on their phylacteries. On the word Elohim, Simeon Ben Joachi says, 'Come and see the mystery of the word Elohim : there are three degrees, and each degree is by itself alone, and yet they are all one, and joined together in one, and are not divided from each other.' Zohar, Lev. § 16. col. 116.1

The Covenant of Grace, Jer. 31. 31; 32. 37 ; Heb. 8. 6; 10. 16.7

The Incarnation of the Son of God, Matt. 1. 18; Luke 1.35; John 1. 1-14.

His mediatorial offices, as the only mediator between God and man, 1 Sam. 2. 25; Job 9. 33; 1 Tim. 2. 5; Heb. 8. 6; 9. 15; 12. 24.7

Redemption from sin and death, through his blood, 1 Cor. 1.30; Gal. 3. 13; Eph. 1. 7; Col. 1. 14; Heb. 9. 12; 1 Pet. 1. 18; Rev. 5. 9.1

The Atonement ;—Christ made an atonement for the sins of the world, Is. 53. 4; Matt. 20. 28; 2 Cor. 5. 21; Gal. 3. 13; Tit. 2. 14; Heb. 9. 28; 1 Pet. 2. 24; 3. 18; 1 John 2. 2 ; 4. 10; which is received through Him, Rom. 5. 11.7

Justification, which is not to be attained by the law, Acts 13. 39; Rom. 3. 20; 8. 3; Gal. 2. 16; 3. 11; Heb. 7.19 ;-nor by any other performance, Job 9. 2; 25. 4; Ps. 130. 3 ; 143. 2; but is given unto us by the grace of God, Rom. 3. 24 ; 4. 4 ; 11. 5; Eph. 2. 8; 2 Tim. 1, 9; Tit. 3. 5;—through the merits and blood of Christ, Acts 13. 38; Rom. 5. 9, 19; 1 Cor. 1. 30 ;—by the means of faith, Rom. 3. 22: 4. 16; Gal. 2. 16; 3. 11, 24; Eph. 2. 8; Heb. 10. 38; 11. 7; and in answer to fervent prayer, Deut. 4. 29; Jer. 29. 13.7

• Comprehensive Bible. Introd. p. 61.

I Note in loco.

+ Idem, Index to Subjects in voce.

Adoption, the promise, marks, and effects of which are stated, Isa. 56. 5; John 1. 12; Rom. 8. 14; 2 Cor. 6. 18; Gal. 3. 26 ; 4.6; Eph. 1.5 ; 1 John 3. 1 ; Rev. 11. 7.**

For a more full detail of this evidence see the next section.

4. From the scheme of doctrine and morality contained in the

Bible being so exalted, pure, and benevolent, that God alone could either devise or appoint it. Such as,

(1.) Concerning God.—The word onbx, elohim, which is rendered God, in the singular mabx, eloah, and in Arabic all, allah, is derived from the Arabic, al, alaha, he worshipped, adored, was struck with astonishment, fear or terror : and hence, he adored with sacred horror and veneration : it also signifies, he succoured, liberated, kept in safety or defended. Hence we learn that o'zbx, elohim, denotes the sole object of adoration ; the perfection of whose nature must astonish all who contemplate them, and fill with horror all who rebel against him ; that consequently he must be worshipped with reverence and religious fear; and that every sincere worshipper may expect help in his weaknesses, &c. freedom from the power, guilt, and consequences of sin, and support and defence to the uttermost. See Dr. A. Clarke, on Gen. 1. 1.7 The name , Yehowah, which we translate Lord, is the name by which God had been known from the creation of the world, (Gen. 2. 2.) and by which He is known to the present day. Even the heathen knew this name of the true God, and from it formed their Jao, Jeve, Jove, and Jupiter, i. e. Jovis pater, father Jove. 1979, Yehowa, from 177, hawah, to be, subsist, signifies He who is, or subsists, i.e. eminently and in a manner superior to all other beings; and is essentially the same with 17078, ehevch, I AM, in Exod. 3. 14.1–His unity, Ex. 20.3; Deut. 4. 35, 39; 5.7; 6. 4; 32. 39 ; Ps. 86. 10; Is. 37. 16; 43. 10; 44. 6; 45. 5; Jer. 10. 10; John 17. 3; 1 Cor. 8. 4–6; Gal. 3. 20; Eph. 4. 6; 1 Tim. 2. 5;—a spirit, John 4. 24; 1 Tim. 1. 17; 6. 16;-invisible, Ex. 33. 20; John 1, 18; 5. 37; Rom. 20; Col. 1. 15; 1 Tim. 6. 16; Heb. 11. 27; 1 John 4. 12;—the true God, Jer. 10. 10;—the living God, Dan. 4. 34 ; 6. 26; Acts 14. 15; 1 Thess. 1, 9; Heb. 9. 14; 10.31 ;-God and Lord alone, 2 Kings 19. 15; Neh. 9.6; Ps. 33. 18; 86. 10; Isa. 37. 16, 20;none else, or beside him, Deut. 4. 35; 2 Sam. 7. 22 ; 22. 32; 2 Kings 5. 15; Isa. 44. 6, 8; 45. 5, 6, 14, 18, 21, 22; 46.9; Hos. 13. 4;none with him, Deut. 32. 39 ;-none before him, Isa. 43. 10;-none like him, or to be compared to him, Ex. 8. 10; 9. 14; 15. 11; Deut. 4. 12; 33. 26; 2 Sam. 7. 22; 1 Chr. 17. 10; Ps. 35. 10; 86. 8; 89. 6; Isa. 40. 18; 46. 5, 9; Jer. 10. 6, 7, 10; God is alone,—who can

re

+ Idem, note on Deut. 5. 9.

* Comprehensive Bible, Index to Subjects in voce.

[ocr errors]

semble Him? He is that eternal, illimitable, unimpartible, unchangeable, incomprehensible, uncompounded, ineffable Being, whose essence is hidden from all created intelligences, and whose counsels cannot be fathomed by any creature that even , His own hand can form.*—Blessed, Ps. 119. 12; Rom. 1. 25; 1 Tim. 1. 11; 6. 15;-his name to be revered, Deut. 5. 11; -his great majesty, Hab. 3. 3 ;-incomprehensible, Job 11. 7; Ps. 145. 3 ;—his superiority to idols, Is. 40. 12, &c.; 41. 21; 44. 9; 45. 20; 46. 5; Jer. 10. 12 ;--the creator of all things, Gen. 1. 1, &c.; Neh. 9.6; Job 25. 7; Ps. 33. 6; 89. 11; 148.5; Prov. 3. 19; Is. 34. 1; 45. 18; Jer. 38. 16; Zec. 12. 1;-his works unsearchable, Ec. 8. 17;-the governor of all things, Ps. 135, 6;—our constant preserver, Acts 17. 28;-his immortality, Deut. 33. 27; 1 Tim. 1. 17; 6. 16; Rev. 4. 9;—his immutability, Ex. 3. 14, 15; Nu. 23. 19; Mal. 3. 5, 6; Rom. 1. 23; Heb. 1. 12; 13. 8; James 1. 17;—his incorruptibility, Rom, 1. 23;-his providence, Ex. 21. 13; Job 1. 12; 2. 6; 5. 6; 23. 14; Ps. 65. 9; 75. 6; 105. 14; 113. 7; 127. 1; 147, 6; Pr. 16. 9, 23; 19. 21; 20. 24 ; 21, 30; Ec. 9. 1, 11; Jer. 10. 23; Mat. 6. 26; 10. 29; John 3. 27. Those events, which appear to us the effect of choice, contrivance, or chance, are matters of appointment with God; and the persuasion of this does not prevent, but rather encourage, the use of all proper means : at the same time that it confines us to proper means, and delivers the mind from useless anxiety about consequences. + His eternity, Ps. 9. 7; 90. 2, 4; 93. 2; 102. 12, 24, 27; '104. 31; 135. 3; 145. 13; Is. 40. 28; 57. 15; 63. 16; Jer. 10. 10; Lam. 5.

Dan. 4. 3; 1 Tim. 1. 17; Rom. 1. 20; 2 Cor. 4.8; 2 Pet. 1. 11; -first and last, Isa. 41. 4; 44. 6 ; 48. 12; Rev, 1, 8;-his omnipresence, 1 Kings 8. 27; Ps. 139. 7—10; “If I take the wings of the morning," &c. Light has been proved, by many experiments, to travel at the astonishing rate of 194,188 miles in a second of time and comes from the sun to the earth, a distance of 95,513,794 miles, in 8 minutes and nearly 12 seconds ! But, could I even fly upon the wings or rays of the morning light, which diffuses itself with such velocity over the globe from east to west, instead of being beyond Thy reach, or by this sudden transition be able to escape Thy notice, Thy arm could still at pleasure prevent or arrest my progress, and I should still be encircled with the immensity of Thy essence. The sentiment in this noble passage is remarkably striking, and the description truly sublime.1-Pr. 15. 3; Jer. 23. 23, 24; 2 Chr. 6. 18; Eph. 1. 23;--omniscience, 1 Sam. 2. 3; Job 26. 6; 28. 24; 34. 21; 35. 4; Ps. 33. 13; 44. 21 ; 94. 9; 139. 2; Pr. 15. 11; Isa. 30. 18; Je. 32. 19; Matt. 6. 18; 10. 29; Acts 15. 18; Heb. 4. 12, 13; 1 John 3. 20;-his omnipotence, Gen. 17. 1; 18. 14; Job 9. 4; 23. 13; 37. 23; 42. 2; Ps. 35. 10; 62. 11; 68. 35; 135. 6; Isa. 26. 4; 40. 29; Jer. 32. 17; Dan. 4. 35; Matt. 19. 26; Luke 1. 37; 2 Cor.

19;

+ Idem, Note on Gen. 24. 44.

• Comprehensive Bible, Note on Psalm 71. 19.

Idem, Note in loco.

12. 9; Is. 14. 24; Dan. 3. 17, 29; Rom. 1. 20;-his wisdom, Job 9. 4; 36. 5; Ps. 92. 5; 104. 24; 147.5; Isa. 28. 19; Rom. 16. 27; 1 Cor. 3. 19, 20; 1 Tim. 1. 17 ;-his knowledge, 1 John 2. 3; 3.6; 4. 6; Ps. 147. 4, 5. “Ile telleth the number of the stars," &c. The fixed stars, in general, are considered to be innumerable suns, similar to that in our system, each having an appropriate number of planets moving round it; and, where they are in great abundance, Dr. Herschel supposes they form primaries and secondaries, i. e. suns revolving about suns ; and that this must be the case in the milky way, the stars being there in prodigious quantities; of which he gives the following proof: On August 22, 1792, he found that in 41 minutes, not less than 258,000 stars had passed through the field of view in his telescope! What must God be who has made, governs, and supports so many worlds, and who • telleth the number of the stars ; and calleth them by name.'*_His foreknowledge, Gen. 18. 18; 1 Kings 22. 22; Rom. 8. 29; 2 Tim. 1. 9; 1 Pet. 1. 2, 20;-his perfection, Ex. 15.7; Ps. 145. 12; Matt. 5. 48; -produces good from the evil designs of men, Gen. 45. 8; 50. 20; Job 5. 12; Ps. 33. 10 ; 76. 10; Pr. 16. 9, 33; 19. 21 ;—disposes of things as he pleases from the beginning, Deut. 8. 18; 1 Chr. 29. 12; 2 Chr. 1. 12; Job 1. 21 ; 9. 12; Ps. 75.7; Dan. 4. 17;-his. justice, Gen. 18. 25; Deut. 32. 4; 2 Chr. 19. 7; Job 8. 3; 34. 17; 35. 10; Ps. 145. 17; Jer. 9. 24; 32. 18; Dan. 9. 14; Ezek. 18. 25; Acts 17. 31 ; Rev. 15. 3; 19. 1, 2;-in not punishing children for the sins of their parents, Deut. 24. 16; Ezek. 18. 2 ;—he often delays his judgments, Ecc. 8.11 ;-his chastisements to be borne, Job 1. 21; 2. 10; Heb. 12. 5;—his mercy, Exod. 20. 6; 34.6; 2 Sam. 24. 14; Ps. 57. 10; 86. 5; 100.5; 103. 8; 119. 64; Isa. 1. 18; Joel 2. 13; 2 Cor. 1. 3; Eph. 2. 4; 1 Pet. 1. 3 ; 1 John 1. 9 ;-his love to Christians, 1 John 3. 1;—his goodness, Ps. 86. 5; 145. 9; Matt. 19. 17;—his holiness, Lev. 19. 2; 1 Sam. 2. 2; 6. 20 ; John 17. 11; Isa. 6.3; Rev. 4.8; 15. 4 ;-his truth and faithfulness, Isa. 65. 16; 2 Cor. 1. 18, 20; Heb. 10. 23; 11. 11; 2 Peter 3. 9; Rev. 15. 3;-exhortations to trust in him, Ps. 61. 62. 63. 64. 69. 70. 71. 75. 85. 86. 91. 94. 115. 116. 118. 121. 123. 125. 131.;-his promises to the Israelites fulfilled, Josh. 21. 43 ;—the sole object of worship, Exod. 20. 1; Deut. 4. 14, 39, 40; Luke 4. 8;—to be feared, Ps. 33.8; 76. 7;—to be loved, Matt. 22. 37; -to be obeyed, Acts 5. 29 ;-not to be tempted, Deut. 6. 16; Matt. 4. 7;—to be imitated, Eph. 5. 1.1

(2.) Concerning Christ.—He was above Moses, Heb. 3. 5; and all the Levitical priests, Heb. 7. 21; 8.1; &c.—he was co-eternal with the Father, John 1. 1, 3; 17.5; Col. 1. 17; Heb. 13. 8;—he is co-equal with the Father, Matt. 28. 18; John 5. 23; 16. 15; 17. 10; Phil. 2.6; Col. 1. 16; 2. 9;-he is of one substance with the Father, John 10. 30, 38; 12. 45; 17. 11, 22 ; 14.9;—though, in his humanity, inferior to the

Father, John 14. 28;—he is King of kings, Lord of lords, and God of gods, Rom. 14. 9; Phil. 2. 9; Col. 2. 10, 15; 1 Pet. 3. 22; Rev. 17. 14; 19. 16;—he was one with his disciples, John 17. 21; Heb. 2. 11, &c. -he was perfect man, Matt. 4. 2; 8. 24; 26. 38; John 1. 14; 4.6; 11. 35; 12. 27; 19. 28; Phil. 2. 7; Heb. 2. 14;—he was without sin, though tempted as other men, John 8. 46; 2 Cor. 5. 21; Heb. 4. 15; 7. 26; 1 Pet. 2. 22; 1 John 3. 5;~he learned obedience by suffering, Heb. 5. 8. He was perfect God, this appears, 1. By his being expressly so called, Isa. 9.6; Matt. 1. 23; John 1.1; Rom. 9. 5; Col. 2. 9; 1 Tim. 3. 16; Heb. 3. 4; 1 John 3. 16; 1 Pet. 1. 1, where the margin reads, our God and Saviour.'—This is certainly the literal and proper rendering of the original, του θεου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου, and should have been received in the text: it is an absolute proof that St. Peter calls Jesus GOD, in the most proper sense of the term ;1 John 1. 1, “That which was from the beginning,' &c. "O, which, in the neuter gender, that uncreated, self-existent, and eternal excellence, Jesus Christ. Thus he says, 'I and my Father are one,' ev, not elç, (John 10. 30.) *—2. By his forgiving sins, Matt. 9. 2 ; Luke 5. 20; 7. 48;—3. By his miracles, John 3. 2; 5. 36; 10. 25, 38 ; 14. 10 ;-4. By his knowing men's thoughts, Matt. 9. 4; 12. 25; Mark 2.8; Luke 5. 22; 6.8; 9. 47; 11. 17, 20. The reasoning of the Pharisees, (v. 17, and Matt. 12. 24, 25,) was not expressed, and Jesus, knowing their thoughts, gave ample proof of his omniscience. This, with our Lord's masterly confutation of their reasonings, by a conclusion drawn from their own premises, one would have supposed might have humbled and convinced those men; but the most conclusive reasoning, and the most astonishing miracles, were lost upon a people who were obstinately determined to disbelieve every thing that was good relative to Jesus of Nazareth.*—John 2. 24; 6.61; 21. 17;—5. By his ruising himself from the dead, John 2. 9; 10. 17;—6. By his promising and sending the Holy Ghost, John 14.26 ; 15. 26 ; Acts 1. 5; 2. 4;—7. By the attributes of creation, omnipotence, and omniscience, &c. being ascribed to him, Col. 1. 16; Heb. 1. 2; Phil. 3. 21; 1 Cor. 4. 5; -8. By his expressly claiming it, John 8. 58, ^ Before Abraham was, I am.' That our Lord by this expression asserted his divinity and eternal existence, as the great I AM, appears evident from the use of the present tense, instead of the preter; from its being in answer to the Jews, who inquired, whether he had seen Abraham ; and from its being thus understood by the multitude, who were exasperated at it to such a degree, that they took up stones to stone him. The ancient Jews not only believed that the Messiah was superior to, and Lord of all the Patriarchs, and even of angels, (see Yalkut Simeoni on Isa. 52. 13; Bereshith Rabba on Gen. 28. 10; Zohar, Gen. fol. 88,) but that his celestial nature existed with God, from whom it emanated, before the creation, (Netzach Israel, c. 35, fol. 38,) and that the creation was effected by his ministry, (Zohar, 1, fol.

• Comprehensive Bible, Note in loco.

« ÎnapoiContinuați »