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thereof, under the immigration laws. It will be observed from the following table that of this number over 60,000 were of the nonimmigrant class (that is, entering the country with a temporary status) and that more than 64,000 were aliens of the returning resident class. A significant figure included in the above is that covering aliens born in adjoining territory, the total running to more than 175,000. These aliens, with their wives and children, are not chargeable to any quota. In other words, of the grand total of aliens admitted with formal record, as above set forth, 311,115 were not chargeable to quotas, being of the nonimmigrant or nonquota classes. This figure is notable as showing the latitude provided by the present immigration laws for the admission of the temporary classes of alien travel and aliens coming for permanent stay from adjoining territory.

While the quotas in operation for the last year made possible the admission of 164,667 aliens, the number of quota immigrants actually admitted was 145,971, showing that the possibilities of admission afforded by the act of 1924 were not fully utilized. Tables hereinafter presented go into further analysis of the particular races and nationalities for quota purposes represented by the total of quota immigrants mentioned. Included within the grand total of aliens first cited above were 1,349 aliens who arrived during the previous fiscal year and whose cases were disposed of during the period covered by this report. ALIENS ADMITTED UNDER THE IMMIGRATION ACT OF 1924, FISCAL YEAR ENDED

JUNE 30, 1925, BY CLASSES
Classes

Number Nonimmigrants under section 3:

admitted (1) Government officials, their families, attendants, servants, and employees--

1, 950 (2) Temporary visitors for Business

14, 461 Pleasure..

20, 865 (3) In continuous transit through the United States.

22, 697 (6) To carry on trade under and in pursuance of the provisions of a present existing treaty of commerce and navigation --

230 Total nonimmigrant aliens..

60, 203 Nonquota immigrants under section 4: (a) Wives of United States citizens.

14, 171 (a) Children of United States citizens..

13, 046 (b) Aliens previously lawfully admitted to the United States returning from a temporary visit abroad..

64, 632 (c) Aliens born in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the

Republic of Mexico, the Republic of Cuba, the Republic of
Haiti, the Dominican Republic, the Canal Zone, or an in-
dependent country of Central or South America -

175, 069 Their wives.

1 623 Their children. (d) Ministers of religious denominations.

694 Their wives..

1 295 Their children.

1 486 (d) Professors of colleges, academies, seminaries, or universities.- 187

Their wives

Their children.. (e) Students---

1, 462 Total nonquota immigrant aliens.-

250, 912 Total nonimmigrant and nonquota aliens (not charged to quota).

311, 115 Quota immigrants under section 5 (charged to quota).

145, 971 Grand total admitted under the act.

457, 086 1 Wives, and unmarried children under 18 years of age, born in quota countries.

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By reference to the foregoing table it will be observed that aliens are divided into three general classifications.

The reasons for this will be found in the following excerpts from the act:

NON-IMMIGRANTS

Sec. 3. When used in this act the term "immigrant” means any alien departing from any place outside the United States destined for the United States, except (1) a Government official, his family, attendants, servants, and employees, (2) an alien visiting the United States temporarily as a tourist or temporarily for business or pleasure, (3) an alien in continuous transit through the United States, (4) an alien lawfully admitted to the United States who later goes in transit from one part of the United States to another through foreign contiguous territory, (5) a bona fide alien seaman serving as such on a vessel arriving at a port of the United States and seeking to enter temporarily the United States solely in the pursuit of his calling as a seaman, and (6) an alien entitled to enter the United States solely to carry on trade under and in pursuance of the provisions of a present existing treaty of commerce and navigation.

NON-QUOTA IMMIGRANTS

SEC. 4. When used in this act the term "non-quota immigrant” means

(a) An immigrant who is the unmarried child under 18 years of age, or the wife, of a citizen of the United States who resides therein at the time of the filing of a petition under section 9;

(b) An immigrant previously lawfully admitted to the United States, who is returning from a temporary visit abroad;

(c) An immigrant who was born in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Republic of Mexico, the Republic of Cuba, the Republic of Haiti, the Dominican Republic, the Canal Zone, or an independent country of Central or South America, and his wife, and his unmarried children under 18 years of age, if accompanying or following to join him;

(d) An immigrant who continuously for at least two years immediately preceding the time of his application for admission to the United States has been, and who seeks to enter the United States solely for the purpose of, carrying on the vocation of minister of any religious denomination, or professor of a college, academy, seminary, or university; and his wife, and his unmarried children under 18 years of age, if accompanying or following to join him; or

(e) An immigrant who is a bona fide student at least 15 years of age and who seeks to enter the United States solely for the purpose of study at an accredited school, college, academy, seminary, or university, particularly designated by him and approved by the Secretary of Labor, which shall have agreed to report to the Secretary of Labor the termination of attendance of each immigrant student, and if any such institution of learning fails to make such reports promptly the approval shall be withdrawn.

QUOTA IMMIGRANTS

Sec. 5. When used in this act the term "quota immigrant” means any immigrant who is not a non-quota immigrant. . An alien who is not particularly specified in this act as a non-quota immigrant or a nonimmigrant shall not be admitted as a non-quota immigrant or a nonimmigrant by reason of relationship to any individual who is so specified or by reason of being excepted from the operation of any other law regulating or forbidding immigration.

Thus it will be seen that with the possible exception of “Government officials, their families, attendants, servants, and employees' those comprehended within classification 1 are aliens who enter for temporary purposes only, while those included in classification 2 for the most part represent aliens of the immigrant class although not chargeable to quotas. Classification 3 represents aliens of the immigrant class chargeable to quotas.

Numerical limitations under immigration act of 1924.

Section 11 provides:

NUMERICAL LIMITATIONS

Sec. 11. (a) The annual quota of any nationality shall be 2 per centum of the number of foreign-born individuals of such nationality resident in continental United States as determined by the United States census of 1890, but the minimum quota of any nationality shall be 100.

(b) The annual quota of any nationality for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1927, and for each fiscal year thereafter, shall be a number which bears the same ratio to 150,000 as the number of inhabitants in continental United States in. 1920 having that national origin (ascertained as hereinafter provided in this section) bears to the number of inhabitants in continental United States in 1920, but the minimum quota of any nationality shall be 100.

(c) For the purpose of subdivision (b) national origin shall be ascertained by determining as nearly as may be, in respect of each geographical area which under section 12 is to be treated as a separate country (except the geographical areas specified in subdivision (c) of section 4) the number of inhabitants in continental United States in 1920 whose origin by birth or ancestry is attributable to such geographical area. Such determination shall not be made by tracing the ancestors or descendants of particular individuals, but shall be based upon statistics of immigration and emigration, together with rates of increase of population as shown by successive decennial United States censuses, and such other data as may be found to be reliable.

(d) For the purpose of subdivisions (b) and (c) the term "inhabitants in continental United States in 1920" does not include (1) immigrants from the geographical areas specified in subdivision (R) of section 4 or their descendants, (2) aliens ineligible to citizenship or their descendants, (3) the descendants of slave immigrants, or (4) the descendants of American aborigines.

(e) The determination provided for in subdivision (c) of this section shall be made by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Secretary of Labor, jointly. In making such determination such officials may call for information and expert assistance from the Bureau of the Census. Such officials shall, jointly, report to the President the quota of each nationality, determined as provided in subdivision (b), and the President shall proclaim and make known the quotas so reported. Such proclamation shall be made on or before April 1, 1927. If the proclamation is not made on or before such date, quotas proclaimed therein shall not be in effect for any fiscal year beginning before the expiration of 90 days after the date of the proclamation. After the making of a proclamation under this subdivision the quotas proclaimed therein shall continue with the same effect as if specifically stated herein, and shall be final and conclusive for every purpose except (1) in so far as it is made to appear to the satisfaction of such officials and proclaimed by the President, that an error of fact has occurred in such determination or in such proclamation, or (2) in the case provided for in subdivision (c) of section 12. If for any reason quotas proclaimed under this subdivision are not in effect for any fiscal year, quotas for such year shall be determined under subdivision (a) of this section.

(f) There shall be issued. to quota immigrants of any nationality (1) no more immigration visas in any fiscal year than the quota for such nationality, and (2) in any calendar month of any fiscal year no more immigration visas than 10 per centum of the quota for such nationality, except that if such quota is less than 300 the number to be issued in any calendar month shall be prescribed by the Commissioner General, with the approval of the Secretary of Labor, but the total number to be issued during the fiscal year shall not be in excess of the quota for such nationality.

(g) Nothing in this act shall prevent the issuance (without increasing the total number of immigration visas which may be issued) of an immigration visa to an immigrant as a quota immigrant even though he is a non-quota immigrant.

STATISTICAL RÉSUMÉ

The following table shows the immigration quotas allotted to specified countries or regions, number of immigration visas issued, and number of aliens admitted and charged against such quota allotments.

Immigration quotas according to nationality proclaimed in pursuance of the immi

gration act of 1924, number of immigration visas granted, and number of aliens admitted and charged against such quotas, fiscal year ended June 30, 1925

[The immigration quotas assigned to the various countries and quota areas should not be regarded as

having any political significance whatever, or as involving recognition of new Governments, or of new boundaries, or of transfers of territory except as the United States Government has already made such recognition in a formal and official manner.)

Country or area

Annual

Visas quota granted

Number admitted

Country or area

NumAnnual Visas

ber adquota granted

mitted

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* Afghanistan..
Albania.
Andorra..
Arabian Peninsula ·, ..
Armenia.
Australia, including

Papua, Tasmania, and
islands appertaining to

Australia,
Austria.
Belgium
*Bhutan
Bulgaria.
Cameroon (proposed

British mandate).
Cameroon (French man-

date).
•China.
Czechoslovakia
Danzig, Free City of.
Denmark 1,4.
Egypt
Esthonia
Ethiopia (Abyssinia).
Finland..
France !,,
Gerininy
Great Britain and North-

ern Ireland 1,3,4,5-
Greece.
Hungary
Iceland
*India
Iraq (Mesopotamia).
Irish Free State 5
Italy, including Rhodes,

Dodekanesia, and Cas

tellorizzo
*Japan.
Latvia.
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania.
Luxemburg
Monaco.
Morocco (French and
Spanish Zones

and
Tangier)
*Muscat (Oman)...

2, 248

466 3,481 45, 760

Nauru (proposed British
mandate)

100
*Nepal..

100 Netherlands 1,3,..

1,648 1, 648 1,500 New Zealand (including appertaining islands)5, 8. 100 100

94 Norway

6, 453 6, 453 6,118 "New Guinea and other

Pacific islands under
proposed Australian
mandate 6

100
Palestine (with Trans-

Jordan, proposed
British mandate).

100 100

61 Persia!

100 100

76 Poland.

5, 982 5,982

4, 873 Portugal 1,..

503 503

474 Ruanda and Urundi

(Belgium inandate). 100 Rumania.

603 603

595 Russia, European and Asiatic i

2, 248 2, 141 Samoa, Western (pro

posed mandate of New
Zealand)

100
San Marino.

100 27

18 Siam..

100
South Africa, Union of .. 100 97

94
South West Africa (pro-
posed

mandate of
Union of South Africa). 100

1

1 Spain

131 131

127 Sweden.

9, 561 9, 561 8, 961 Switzerland.

2,081 2, 081 1, 869 Syria and The Lebanon (French mandate).

100 94

83
Tanganyika (proposed
British mandate)

100
Togoland (proposed
British mandate)

100
Togoland (proposed
French mandate)

100
Turkey..

100

96 *Yar and other Pacific

islands (under Japanese
mandate)

100
Jugoslavia..

671 :
568

489 Total.

164, 667 160, 557 145, 971

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3, 845

100 142 100 100 344 100 100

100

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100 100

For each of the countries indicated by an asterisk (*) is established a nominal quota according to the minimum fixed by law. These nominal quotas, as in the case of all quotas hereby established, are available only for persons born within the respective countries who are eligible to citizenship in the United States and admissible under the immigration laws of the United States.

1(a) Persons born in the portions of Persia, Russia, or the Arabian Peninsula situated within the barred zone, and who are admissible under the immigration laws of the United States as quota immigrants, will be charged to the quotas of these countries; and (b) persons born in the colonies, dependencies, or protec; torates, or portions thereof, within the barred zone of France, Gres Britain, the Netherlands, or Portugal whe are admissible under the immigration laws of the United States as quota immigrants, will be charged to the quota of the country to which such colony or dependency belongs or by which it is administered as a protectorate.

• The quota area denominated " Arabian Peninsula" consists of all territory of that peninsula southeast of Iraq. Palestine, with trans-Jordan, and Egypt, except Muscat and Aden.

* Quota immigrants eligible to citizenship in the United States born in a colony, dependency, or protectorate of any country to which a quota applies will be charged to the quota of that country,

In contrast with the law of 1921, the immigration act of 1924 provides that persons born in the colonies or dependencies of European countries situated in Central America, South America, or the islands adja. cent io the American continents (except Newfoundland and islands pertaining to Newfoundland, Labrador, and Canada', will be charged to the quota of the country to which such colony or dependency belongs.

Quota immigrants born in the British self-governing dominions or in the Empire of India will be charged to the appropriate quota rather than to that of Great Britain and northern Ireland.

There are no quota restrictions for Canada and Newfoundland.

+ As shown on chart No. 1262a, Hydrographic Office, U. S. Navy Department.

as

The quota allotments for practically all the large countries were exhausted, and were greatly exceeded by the number of applicants, indicated by reports received from American consular officers. That in some instances the number of visas issued is in excess of the number of aliens admitted is accounted for by the fact that visas are valid for use at any time within four months after their issuance; also, if an alien to whom an immigration visa is issued is excluded from admission, or does not apply for admission before the expiration of the validity of the visa, or if an alien having an immigration visa issued to him as a quota immigrant is found not to be a quota immigant, no additional immigration visa may be issued in lieu thereof to any other immigrant.

The immigration quotas allotted to specified areas, the number of immigration visas issued, and the number of aliens admitted and charged against such quotas are shown in the following table:

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Total

164, 667

100.0

160, 557

97.5

145, 971

88.6

As previously stated, 458,435 aliens were admitted during that

Included in this total are 294,314 immigrant aliens and 164,121 nonimmigrant aliens. The total number of aliens departing was 225,490, of which number 92,728 were emigrant aliens and 132,762 nonemigrant aliens; therefore the excess of admission over departure was 232,945 aliens, which represents the net gain in alien population for the year, as compared with a net increase for the previous year of 662,557, and 472,820 for the fiscal year 1923.

For the three preceding years during which the act of May 19, 1921, was in force, monthly quotas were fixed at 20 per cent of the annual quotas of the respective nationalities and were reckoned as of the time of the alien's arrival at a port of entry. Under this act it was possible to exhaust the entire annual quota within the first five months, and several of the quotas were actually exhausted during that period. This was particularly true of the fiscal year 1924, during which, because of the exhausting of quotas, there was little quota immigration from Europe in the last six months of that year. Under the immigration act of 1924 an alien who has secured a proper visa from an American consular officer runs no risk of being excluded under that act. Sources of immigration.

While the preceding tables show the number of aliens admitted and charged to quota allotments of specified countries or regions of birth, the changes effected by shifting political boundaries, newly created countries, and so forth, preclude the country or region of birth of an alien being considered an exact criterion to race.

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