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IMMIGRATION LAWS

and

RIGHTS OF ALIENS

Published by

William Weinstein

Member of California Bar

Los Angeles, Cal.

COPYRIGHT 1926

by William Weinstein, Author.

Printed by
M. B. TOURNOUX COMPANY,
139 N. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif.

PREFACE

This book is intented as a convenient source of information on questions primarily concerning the alien, immigrant, and those naturalized citizens desiring to bring over their relatives.

As a former immigrant, I have gone through the experiences of every stage and process during the reformation, assimilation and Americanization periods.

Coming in contact with thousands of aliens from all over the world, I have observed their needs, wants and accomplishments. After years of study the writer has compiled this book as an advanced guide for the alien, so that he may avoid the dangers and pitfalls that confront him on the journey from his native land to the United States, and up to the time of his naturalization.

In my interpretation of the various provisions of the Immigration Laws, I have endeavored to get away from legal phrases and technical terms, so that the alien can read the contents of this book, and understand it thoroughly.

I am not only trying to enlighten the alien as to his legal rights concerning immigration questions, but am, also, giving him my years of legal training and practical experience as a former immigrant, so that he may readily see and avoid the mistakes and drawbacks that come before him.

The Immigration Law is new and complicated. There is no intelligent compilation of that law, as yet, and there is no doubt in my mind that some sections of that law will have to be clarified by the United States Supreme Court. On account of that condition, it is much harder to interpret the law correctly, without any legal precedence.

I trust that, after perusing this book, every reader will have a clear understanding of his rights and privileges, and will appreciate the great opportunities in store here for him. July, 1926

The Author

615724

CHAPTER I.

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, WE THE PEOPLE of the United States, in order to form a more

perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this CONSTITUTION for the United States of America.

ARTICLE 1. SECTION 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

SECTION 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty-five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

[Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons.] The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three.

When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.

The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

SECTION 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.

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